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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Youth Outcomes

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care

Understanding the Differences in How Adolescents Leave Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This policy brief from Chapin Hall explores how young people leave foster care among those who first enter care between ages 13 and 17. The researchers used data from a longitudinal foster care archive of approximately 3 million children nationwide. They analyzed reasons for leaving care by age at first admission and by placement history. They found that age at entry and placement history are both linked to youth outcomes. For example, teenagers who first enter care at age 15 have the highest chance of running away and are less likely to reach permanency than those who entered care earlier in their adolescence, in part because they are more likely to reach the age of majority while in care. Similarly, the types and configuration of placements and the number of placement changes affect the chances of youth reaching permanency or running away while in foster care.

Accession number
25762
Authors
Wulczyn, F., Huhr, S., Schmits, F., Wilkins, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
The Center for State Child Welfare Data
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-the-Differe…

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the sixth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. In collaboration with the University of Southern California and Youth Collaboratory, Chapin Hall published this brief about how communities use a common risk assessment and prioritization tool for youth experiencing homelessness (the TAY-VI-SPDAT: Next Step Tool). The authors found that a common risk assessment tool for youth can effectively help local systems prioritize limited housing resources. They also found positive outcomes associated with housing programs for youth. Youth of color were more likely to come into homelessness system and remained in homelessness systems for longer periods, tending to have fewer successful exits from homelessness by returning to their families. These findings highlight further opportunities for systems to focis on racial equite in addressing the homelessness challenge. The lessons from this analysis bolster the idea that communities can build collective intake and assessment (coordinated entry) systems, develop creative service delivery approaches for youth who do not immediately receive housing, and strengthen data to measure and improve long-term outcomes. The study also looked at how risk assessment scores related to services offered to young people and to their exits from homelessness. Finally, they examined how many youth receiving different types of services remained out of homelessness systems and which youth were most likely to return. This brief summarizes key findings and implications for action for communities and funders.

Accession number
25626
Authors
Morton, M.H., Rice, E., Blondin, M., Hsu, H., Kull, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Youth Collaboratory website at: https://youthcollaboratory.org/sites/default/files/attachments/2018-11/…

The West Coast Convening Framework: A Practical Guide to Outcomes Measurement for Programs Serving Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness

The West Coast Convening Framework: A Practical Guide to Outcomes Measurement for Programs Serving Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the West Coast Convening (WCC) sought to build on existing research-informed frameworks of outcomes measurements for programs serving youth and young adults experiencing homelessness. The WCC Outcomes Workgroup focused on creating a framework that providers and stakeholders can use to facilitate results-driven care, data sharing, and cross-agency analysis. This report is intended as a practical guide about outcomes measurement for providers who are working in the field. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25772
Authors
Wilderson, D., Mousseau, H., Van Buren, E., Jaramillo, A. J.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

West Coast Convening Workgroup

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the WCC website at: http://www.westcoastconvening.com/wcc-outcomes

Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey

Supporting Young People Transitioning from Foster Care: Findings from a National Survey
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Prepared for the Better Housing Coalition and Children’s Society of Virginia, this report from Child Trends focuses on older youth transitioning from foster care using federal outcome data and findings from a policy scan and national survey on services targeted to this population. The authors present the information in six key services areas: post-secondary education, employment/career development, financial capability, affordable housing, health/ mental health care, and permanent relationships with supportive adults. They offer the following recommendations based on the areas of strength for Virginia: keep monitoring data to inform decision making, build strong relationships across the state, and connect with similarly situated states. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25773
Authors
Fryar, G., Jordan, E., DeVooght, K
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/supporting-young-people-transi…

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report looks at the relationship between extended foster care and young adult outcomes. The researchers analyzed data from three national datasets on foster care history, independent living services, and extended foster care. They found that extended foster care is associated with better young adult outcomes and receipt of independent youth services. Despite the low rates of utilization in many states, extended foster care appears to benefit young people as they transition to adulthood. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25757
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ExtendedFosterCa…

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FSYB) presents the results from a collaborative initiative with the Children’s Bureau called the Support Systems (SSRHY) for Rural Homeless Youth: A Collaborative State and Local Demonstration. This initiative focused on improving the circumstances of rural youth by strengthening their connection to support services, community, education, and employment. The SSRHY Demonstration funded six projects in rural areas of Colorado, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Each project worked with transition age youth who had few or no connections to supportive family structures or community support systems. The report outlines the key findings from each project related to collaboration, services, and youth outcomes.

Accession number
25669
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Family and Youth Services Bureau

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge on the FYSB website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/fysb/resource/results-of-ssrhy-demonstration-pr…

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This white paper is a collaboration of the Claremont Evaluation Center, Child Trends, and L.A.’s Best (a large afterschool program in Los Angeles) that sought to address the knowledge gap related to how afterschool practices can support positive youth development (PYD). The authors conducted a research review to show how afterschool programs can build protective and promotive factors associated with supporting PYD. The paper examines which outcomes are important to develop during childhood and adolescence, which protective and promotive factors support positive youth outcomes, and which evidence-informed practices show promise for afterschool programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25744
Authors
Berry, T., Teachanarong-Aragon, L., Sloper, M., Bartlett, J.D., Steber, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Claremont Evaluation Center and Child Trends

Series
LAs Best: Protective Factors Afterschool Project
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Claremont Graduate School website at: http://www.cgu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Berry_LAsBest_WhitePaper…

Nine Guiding Principles to Help Youth Overcome Homelessness: A Principles-Focused Developmental Evaluation

Nine Guiding Principles to Help Youth Overcome Homelessness: A Principles-Focused Developmental Evaluation
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes an evidence-based, principles-focused developmental evaluation that was part of a larger grant program funded by the Otto Bremer Foundation, a private foundation serving the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area. The foundation provided grants to six local youth-serving agencies to address youth homelessness in the Twin Cities. The developmental evaluation was initiated to create a process by which the six agencies could collaborate to improve the outcomes for youth and identify and empirically validate guiding principles. To meet these goals, the researchers engaged the foundation and agency leaders in collaborative evaluation inquiry during monthly reflective practice meetings, which included analyzing 14 youth case studies. The developmental evaluation process resulted in a principles statement and dissemination packet to be used by the agencies going forward. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25510
Authors
Murphy, N.F.
Type new
Book Chapter
Year published new
2016

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the eighth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents the results of a literature review conducted to determine what evidence exists on the effectiveness of programs and practices to prevent youth homelessness and improve various outcomes. The researchers selected 62 studies involving youth homelessness, which evaluated 51 programs, to develop an initial evidence base. This brief outlines the six key findings from this systematic review and the researchers recommendations to expand the evidence base for youth homelessness interventions. These include: 1. A small evidence base shows that youth homeless is preventable; 2. Rental assistance and supportive housing programs show promising results; 3. Most evaluations focus on interventions that address well-being and risk behaviors and show positive results; 4. Family-based interventions show positive results for behavioral health, but more evidence is needed; 5. There is little evidence on interventions to help youth experiencing homelessness achieve better employment outcomes; and 6. There is an alarming mismatch between investments in interventions and their evaluation. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25821
Authors
Morton, M.H., Kugley, S., Epstein, R.A., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/voices-evidence-review/