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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Youth Development

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents emerging findings regarding couch surfing and youth homelessness. The authors use data from a national survey of 13,113 adults with youth ages 13 to 25 in their households or who are themselves ages 18 to 25. Findings suggest that couch surfing is relatively common, particularly among the older age group in this study. Households with youth in these age ranges reported couch surfing in the last 12 months: 4 percent among the younger youth and 20 percent among the older youth. The authors found notable social, economic, and educational differences between youth reporting homelessness and those reporting only couch surfing. However, most youth who reported experiencing homelessness also reported couch surfing. Youth who experienced both circumstances presented high levels of socioeconomic vulnerability. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25627
Authors
Curry, S.R., Morton, M., Matjasko, J.L., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Schlueter, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Project Awareness: Fostering Social Justice Youth Development to Counter Youth Experiences of Housing Instability, Trauma and Injustice

Project Awareness: Fostering Social Justice Youth Development to Counter Youth Experiences of Housing Instability, Trauma and Injustice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) methods coupled with Social Justice Youth Development with six youth experiencing housing instability who were accessing educational, life skill, and developmental services from a drop-in center in Chicago. The participants were active members of youth-centered research workshops. The study aimed to address three questions: 1) In what ways do current youth programs and policies support and/or limit positive youth development (PYD) among unaccompanied youth experiencing housing instability? 2) How might a YPAR approach support PYD of youth experiencing housing instability? 3) How do factors of housing instability, trauma, and race shape the developmental trajectories of unaccompanied youth aged 18-24? Findings from this study reveal the need for increased funding for community-based, PYD services; consistent, yet flexible workshops for highly mobile youth; and safe spaces in which youth can explore and analyze the sociopolitical contexts shaping their experiences to inform their approaches in navigating various social systems and structures. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25526
Authors
Aviles, A.M., Grigalunas, N.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, College of Education and Human Development, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
84
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917304383

Fostering College Success Mentorship Program: A Public-Private Partnership to Build a Better Tomorrow for Youth in Foster Care

Fostering College Success Mentorship Program: A Public-Private Partnership to Build a Better Tomorrow for Youth in Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report outlines a public-private partnership between the Casey Family Programs, New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services (ACS), the City University of New York (CUNY), and Goldman Sachs to develop and implement the Fostering College Success Initiative (FCSI) mentoring program. This program is available to CUNY students who are also in the ACS foster care system. The report summarizes the FCSI program’s core elements and discusses sustainability and replicability to other jurisdictions. It also offers lessons learned about the public-private partnership model and the next steps for the program.

Accession number
25799
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Casey Family Programs

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Casey Family Programs website at: https://www.casey.org/mentoryingnyc/