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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Youth in Custody or Incarcerated Youth

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the national Stop Solitary for Kids campaign is a practical guide for youth justice system administrators, supervisors, staff, practitioners, policymakers, and advocates to begin the process of safely reducing room confinement in their juvenile and adult facilities. It provides examples of this process undertaken by three state agencies and one county sheriff’s department: Colorado Division of Youth Services, Massachusetts Department of Youth Services, Oregon Youth Authority, and Shelby County Sheriff’s Department in Memphis, Tennessee. Data from these jurisdictions demonstrate that reducing room confinement is possible without increasing violence in a facility. Moreover, shifting youth justice facility practices away from punitive isolation and towards models that focus on emotional regulation and behavioral skills helps youth successfully transition back into their communities. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25767
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Stop Solitary for Kids Campaign

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Stop Solitary for Kids website at: http://www.stopsolitaryforkids.org/not-in-isolation/

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the intersection between system-involved youth and runaway and homeless youth. It cites data from interviews with 656 runaway and homeless youth (ages 14 to 21) in 11 cities that show nearly 78 percent of the participants had at least one interaction with law enforcement. In addition, 7 percent of survey participants directly attributed their first homelessness experience with exiting jail or prison. In Part I of the report, the authors describe each of the 10 Principles of Change developed by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in collaboration with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The principles provide a roadmap for communities to help young people avoid experiencing juvenile justice system involvement or youth homelessness. In Part II, the report gives specific resources and examples related to each Principle of Change. Appendix I outlines a case study of Davidson County, Tennessee, as a juvenile court system working to decriminalize and address youth homelessness. Appendix II describes state-level efforts in Maryland, South Carolina, and Vermont that focus on homelessness among system-involved youth. 

Accession number
25457
Authors
Pilnik, L., Bardine, D., Furr, L., Maury, M., Sickmund, M., Smoot, N., Szanyi, J,
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/FINAL%20Pr…