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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Youth Advisory Board

Food and Housing Security Among NC State Students

Food and Housing Security Among NC State Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes the Food and Housing Security Among NC State Students Initiative, which was launched in fall 2017. It provides key findings from a survey of a representative sample of NC State students (n=1,949) about food and housing security on statewide campuses. According to survey findings, 14 percent reported low or very low food security over the past 30 days and 9.6 percent experienced homelessness over the last 12 months. The researchers found an overlap between food and housing insecurity: 24 percent of students who had been homeless within the last year had also been food insecure in the last 30 days. The report includes recommendations for resolving food and housing insecurity among college students: 1) establish a permanent advisory council of students, faculty, staff, administrators, and partners; 2) coordinate services through a single point of contact; 3) develop an intentional research agenda; 4) secure funding streams; and 5) raise awareness and conduct ongoing outreach. Other program considerations include helping students access financial resources such as SNAP and FAFSA at the federal level and institution level resources, such as emergency funds and short-term loans. The report includes a list of resources with links to additional information. 

Accession number
25456
Authors
Haskett, M.E., Majumder, S., Kotter-Grühn, D.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoolhouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/NC-Sta…

Awareness, Analysis, Engagement: Critical Consciousness Through Foster Youth Advisory Board Participation

Awareness, Analysis, Engagement: Critical Consciousness Through Foster Youth Advisory Board Participation
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a study that uses a strengths-based, critical consciousness framework to describe how 15 foster youth advisory board members in a single state reflect on, analyze, and respond to their socio-political worlds. Foster youth advisory boards provide child welfare-involved young people a forum through which to impact the policies, programs, and services that govern their care. In addition to facilitating policy change, these boards may also enable participating youth to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their worlds. To this end, the author aims to describe youth advisory board processes, while also analyzing how critical consciousness develops through foster youth advisory board participation. The author discusses emergent themes around the existing dimensions of critical consciousness. The article includes implications for policy, practice, and future research. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25878
Authors
Forenza, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
35
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available through journal subscription or article purchase at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-017-0515-3

A Critical Analysis of Foster Youth Advisory Boards in the United States

A Critical Analysis of Foster Youth Advisory Boards in the United States
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to identify how child welfare agencies implement Youth Advisory Boards and how youth aging out of care or practitioners working with this population can access their local boards. The researchers conducted a content analysis of public child welfare agency programs to identify the youth boards in each state and the District of Columbia. Of the 51 youth boards, the researchers found that some were exclusively administered by public child welfare agencies and others by public-nonprofit partnerships. The study identifies the contact information for each youth board. They concluded that Youth Advisory Boards can be useful, pro-social mediums to include foster youth in case planning and policy dialog, while simultaneously promoting a sense of leadership, mentorship, and ecological permanence. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25595
Authors
Forenza, B., Happonen, R.G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Youth Care Forum

Volume new
45
Year published new
2016