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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Youth

Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound

Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This collaborative report from the National Wraparound Initiative and the Pathways Research and Training Center at Portland State looks at how providers modify the Wraparound approach when working with older youth and young adults. The authors conducted a qualitative analysis by conducting interviews with facilitators, peer support providers, and program managers in eight states. This report presents a summary of these interviews and offers suggestions for training and technical assistance for Wraparound programs working with older youth and adults based on these findings. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25777
Authors
Walker, J.S., Baird, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Wraparound Initiative and Research and Training Center on Pathways to Positive Futures

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Childrens Mental Health Network website at: https://www.cmhnetwork.org/resources/10298/

The Prevalence of Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships Among Children and Adolescents

The Prevalence of Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships Among Children and Adolescents
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article describes the study of safe, stable, nurturing relationships (SSNRs) among children and youth in the U.S. using a nationally representative sample of 4,503 children and youth ages 1 month to 17 years. The National Survey of Childrens Exposure to Violence II was designed to obtain up-to-date incidence and prevalence estimates of a wide range of childhood victimizations and information about parenting practices, social support, and stressful life events. To encourage healthy development in children and youth, a better understanding is needed of how exposure to violence and victimization is situated within broader risk contexts as well as those that may be protective or encourage resilience. The authors provide a comprehensive assessment of SSNR factors; examine interrelationships among different indicators of SSNRs; and investigate the consequences of SSNRs for child and adolescent mental health. Results of this study indicate that almost 25 percent of children and adolescents ages 5 to 15 lived in family environments with only moderate levels of safety, stability, and nurturance, while about 1 in 15 had consistently low levels across multiple domains. Lack of SSNRs appears to most heavily burden older adolescents and children living in nontraditional family structures. (Author Abstract-Modified) 

Accession number
25413
Authors
Turner, H.A., Merrick, M.T., Finkelhor, D., Hamby, S., Shattuck, A., Henly, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

Journal Name

Juvenile Justice Bulletin

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention website at https://www.ojjdp.gov/pubs/249197.pdf

Polyvictimization and Developmental Trauma Adaptations in Sex Trafficked Youth

Polyvictimization and Developmental Trauma Adaptations in Sex Trafficked Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a qualitative study of 32 cases of young people who were sex trafficked as minors. The author reviews their cases for histories of early adversity and polyvictimization and any common coercive strategies of traffickers, including manipulation of the victims’ unmet physical and emotional needs. The study describes developmental trauma adaptations in these youth, including affect dysregulation and impulsivity; changes in attention and consciousness; interpersonal relationship issues; and impairments in self-perception and attributions. Based on these findings, the author recommends developmentally and culturally appropriate trauma-informed services for sex trafficked children and youth.

Accession number
25659
Authors
Hopper, E.K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma

Volume new
10
Year published new
2017

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a national study of 215 youth, ages 13 to 25, experiencing housing instability in five US counties. The researchers used life-course interviews, a housing timeline tool, and background survey data to explore the participants use and rejection of both formal and informal resources. From their analysis, the researchers created a model of “youth logics of engagement” that shaped how youth interpreted the costs versus benefits of using available resources. The model includes the interrelated factors of identity protection, accumulated experience, and personal agency. The researchers contend youth may unintentionally expose themselves to physical risks by avoiding resources they believe might comprise their emotional, psychological, or relational well-being.

Accession number
25664
Authors
Samuels, G.M., Cerven, C., Curry, S.R., Robinson, S.R.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire journal issue available free of charge on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a research project initiated by a community-academic partnership to count homeless youth and conduct a survey focused on the health needs of this population. After a four-week recruitment period, the authors counted 632 youth, of which 420 were directly surveyed for this study. They found the following methodologies were the most effective: 1) using an extended counting period, 2) applying broader inclusion criteria to capture those in unstable housing, 3) using student volunteers in health training programs, 4) recruiting from magnet events for high-risk youth, and 4) partnering with community agencies to disseminate the findings. The authors found that the following strategies did not facilitate recruitment: 1) respondent-driven sampling, 2) street canvassing beyond known hotspots, and 3) community agencies leading data collection efforts. Most youth completed the self-report survey and provided detailed information about risk behaviors. In addition, the survey results captured the different housing types, including youth staying in shelters or transitional housing (n=205), those in unstable housing (n=75), and those who were on the streets or living in uninhabitable places (n=140). The article includes recommendations on how to combine research data collection with counting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25516
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Santa Maria, D.M., Ha, Y., Cooper, J., Schieszler, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
41
Year published new
2016
Availability

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides the official definition of youth homelessness as developed by the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness. It discusses why a definition of youth homelessness should be distinguished from adult homelessness. For young people, homelessness not only involves the lack of stable housing but also the absence of a home where they are embedded in relations of dependence. The report provides a typology of homelessness and housing insecurity: unsheltered, emergency sheltered, provisionally accommodated, and at risk of homelessness. An appendix is provided for the full typology. The report outlines the key differences within the youth homelessness population in terms of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. It discusses the different pathways to youth homelessness: individual and relational factors, structural factors, and systems failures. The report discusses the short- and long-term effects homelessness may have on youth related to physical and mental health, exploitation and victimization, criminality and street lifestyles, and lack of education from school dropout. The report also lists challenges faced by young people due to the lack of adequate services and resources. Canada has signed four core United Nations human rights agreements related to homeless youth. 

Accession number
25444
Authors
Canadian Observatory on Homelessness
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Definition_of_Youth_Homelessn…