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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Treatment Outcomes

Trauma-informed Care for Street-involved Youth

Trauma-informed Care for Street-involved Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter reviews trauma and youth homelessness, discusses specific strategies to implement trauma-informed care in service settings, and provides excerpts of interviews with youth and service providers that illustrate the challenges homeless youth face and how trauma-informed services address their unique needs. Research indicates that trauma is pervasive in the lives of youth who are street involved or homeless and is both a cause and a consequence of homelessness. Homeless youth are vulnerable to victimization and may be plagued by chronic stress, including unmet basic needs, food insecurity, and loss of friends, family members, community, and social supports. This type of chronic and repeated exposure to adversity and trauma leads to serious mental health consequences. In addition, young people with complex trauma may have difficulty engaging with service providers and benefiting from traditional youth services. The chapter concludes with implementation considerations and key messages for practitioners and agencies.  

Accession number
25431
Authors
Hopper, E.K., Olivet, J., Bassuk, E.L.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Ch1-4-MentalHealthBook.pdf

Substance Use and Mental Health Interventions for Youth Who Are Homeless: The Community Reinforcement Approach and Motivational Enhancement Therapy

Substance Use and Mental Health Interventions for Youth Who Are Homeless: The Community Reinforcement Approach and Motivational Enhancement Therapy
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter provides information on two substance use and mental health interventions for homeless youth--the community reinforcement approach (CRA) and motivational enhancement therapy (MET). An estimated 48 percent to 98 percent of youth who are homeless meet criteria for at least one mental health diagnosis, including depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychosis, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Between 69 percent and 86 percent meet criteria for a substance use disorder. Youth who are homeless have elevated rates of co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders when compared with their housed peers. Left untreated, substance use and mental health problems create additional barriers to exiting homelessness. Intervention efforts to improve the lives of these youth may have limited impact if underlying substance use and mental health problems are not treated. Research has shown that using CRA and MET has been effective among homeless youth. Youth who participated in CRA reported increases in social stability and decreases in drug use and depression compared with usual treatment. MET has been associated with similar positive outcomes. The book chapter describes the theoretical basis for both interventions, as well as program components and implementation considerations.   

Accession number
25428
Authors
Brakenhoff, B., Slesnick, N.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.

Healing With Books: A Literature Review of Bibliotherapy Used With Children and Youth Who Have Experienced Trauma

Healing With Books: A Literature Review of Bibliotherapy Used With Children and Youth Who Have Experienced Trauma
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This literature review examines the benefits and outcomes of bibliotherapy when used with children who have experienced trauma. Bibliotherapy--a therapeutic process of guided discussion of literature that provides an experience used to treat emotional and behavioral problems--can assist children and youth (ages 3-18) in healing and developing effective coping skills after they experience trauma. The use of literature and identifying how to live more effectively through the characters and problems featured in a book enables children and youth to increase their insight and understanding of the themes and experiences as they relate to their own lives. Bibliotherapy is reinforced through the use of a variety of techniques such as discussion, therapeutic use of art, dramatization, puppetry, and creative writing. Bibliotherapy as a recreational therapy intervention is discussed in terms of improving child outcomes and advancing recreational therapy professional practice. (Author Abstract Modified)  

Accession number
25417
Authors
De Vries, D., Brennan, Z., Lankin, M., Morse, R., Rix, B., Beck, T.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI

Journal Name

Therapeutic Recreation Journal

Volume new
51
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available by subscription or purchase at the journal website:https://js.sagamorepub.com/trj/article/view/7652

Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Final Report from the Second Cohort of Projects

Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Final Report from the Second Cohort of Projects
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, presents findings from the cross-site process evaluation of the second cohort of domestic victims of human trafficking demonstration projects. In 2015, the Family and Youth Services Bureau awarded three two-year cooperative agreements in addition to the first cohort awarded in 2014. The second cohort included projects in Billings, Montana; North Dakota and Clay County, Minnesota; and Multnomah County, Oregon. The purpose of the demonstration program was to improve organizational and community capacity to deliver trauma-informed and culturally relevant services for domestic victims of human trafficking through coordinated systems of agency services and partnerships with allied professionals.

Accession number
25670
Authors
Krieger, K., Walters, J.L.H., Kluckman, M., Feinberg, R., Gremminger, M., Orme, S., Misra, S., Gibbs, D.A.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge on the OPRE website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/evaluation-domestic-victims-human…

Ecologically Based Family Therapy for Adolescents Who Have Left Home

Ecologically Based Family Therapy for Adolescents Who Have Left Home
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes ecologically based family therapy (EBFT) and its application to treating homeless youth. Youth who are experiencing homelessness have frequently experienced high levels of family conflict and a lack of family support. They often experience maltreatment, including verbal, physical, and sexual abuse, as well as emotional neglect and rejection. The problems youth face at home are often motivators for leaving home and a barrier to returning. This means that including the family in intervention efforts can optimize positive outcomes. The chapter discusses components of the EBFT intervention, including session logistics, training, engaging adolescents and primary caregivers, and family therapy techniques. It also details common situations observed among youth who have left home and their families. They include leaving the shelter or home, transitioning back to the home, situations in which caregivers are under investigation for child abuse, and when caregivers refuse to allow the youth to live in the home. Also discussed are implementation considerations.  

Accession number
25432
Authors
Cully, L., Wu, Q., Slesnick, N.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.