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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Transitional Living Programs

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about the Housing First for Youth (HF4Y) program model. HF4Y is a rights-based intervention developed in Canada for young people (ages 13 to 24) who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The program is designed to provide immediate access to safe, affordable, and appropriate housing. This guide describes the program’s five core principles: a right to housing without preconditions; youth choice, youth voice, and self-determination; positive youth development and wellness orientation; individualized, client-driven supports with no time limits; and social inclusion and community integration. It also includes sections about service delivery and data management, as well as three program case studies. The guide defines the HF4Y program and philosophy and delineates it from the original Housing First movement that focuses on the adult homeless population. The author outlines the types of housing, called models of accommodation, which are consistent with the HF4Y program framework. In addition, the guide includes the range of supports beyond housing for youth who participate in an HF4Y program. These supports are in the following areas: health, well-being, life skills, employment, education, and socialization.

Accession number
25451
Authors
Gaetz, S.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-AWH-HF4Y.pdf

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis

The Impact of Transitional Programmes on Post-Transition Outcomes for Youth Leaving Out-of-Home Care: A Meta-Analysis
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a meta-analysis of internationally published literature from 1990 to 2014 investigating the impact of transitional program participation among youth ages 15 to 24. The study focused on post-transition outcomes related to housing, education, employment, mental health, and substance abuse. After conducting a comprehensive database search, the researchers found 19 studies, all from the United States, that met their inclusion criteria. They found that the most frequently described housing outcomes were living independently and homelessness. The rates of post-transition employment varied while the rates of post-secondary education were low. Furthermore, transitioning youth commonly reported depression and alcohol use. The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that attention should be given to the potential benefits of transitional program participation on outcomes such as housing, employment, and education. Further analyses showed that these benefits may differ based on study design, sample size, and sampling unit, but not for mean age or gender. Further detailed and rigorous research internationally is needed to examine the characteristics of transitional programs that produce more successful outcomes for youth, and whether these outcomes are sustained longitudinally. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25545
Authors
Heerde, J.A., Hemphill, S.A., Scholes-Balog, K.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Health and Social Care in the Community

Volume new
26
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article and supplement available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/hsc.12348

Resident Perspectives on Life in a Transitional Living Program for Homeless Young Adults

Resident Perspectives on Life in a Transitional Living Program for Homeless Young Adults
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study using a qualitative approach to explore the perceptions of homeless young adults about their experiences as residents of a transitional living program (TLP). The ages of the residents range from 18 to 22. The study asked the TLP residents about their expectations for themselves and others in the program and their perception of the TLP rules and structure. The results show the participants value hard work, self-discipline, and positive attitudes. However, they feel the TLP rules are often excessive and inflexible. The authors conclude that these programs should ensure the rules do not interfere with the healthy development and successful transition among the residents.

Accession number
25774
Authors
Curry, S.R., Petering, R.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
34
Year published new
2017
Availability

Article available with a journal subscription: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-017-0488-2

Rapid Re-Housing Handbook Version 1.0: A Resource Guide for Rapid Re-Housing Programs

Rapid Re-Housing Handbook Version 1.0: A Resource Guide for Rapid Re-Housing Programs
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from Point Source Youth provides information about how to implement, evaluate, and refine rapid re-housing (RRH) programs for youth. The handbook defines the RRH approach as a youth-centered solution that helps young people obtain a lease in their name and provides wraparound services that support them as they work to maintain stable housing. It covers the core components of RRH, the justification for implementing RRH, and information about the joint transitional housing to rapid re-housing (TH-RRH) component HUD introduced in 2017.

Accession number
25779
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Point Source Youth

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Point Source Youth website at: https://www.pointsourceyouth.org/rapid-rehousing

Older Youth Need Support Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood

Older Youth Need Support Transitioning from Foster Care to Adulthood
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This fact sheet from Child Trends uses infographics to show the experiences of older youth in foster care since the inception of the John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Act in 1999. It also provides a brief overview of outcomes associated with participation in extended foster care and a policy timeline that highlights child welfare policies involving older youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25768
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S., Sepulveda, K.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/publications/fact-sheet-older-youth-need-su…

Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care

Housing for Young Adults in Extended Federally Funded Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief describes a study that looked at how state-operated extended foster care (EFFC) programs are providing young adults in EFFC with safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate housing. The authors focused on the states with the largest number of young people participating in EFFC programs: California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. They conducted interviews with representatives from eight of the nine state’s public child welfare agencies to gather information about housing options for EFFC programs. From these conversations, the authors suggest future research questions related to housing options and supportive services that lead to the best outcomes for young adults who participate in EFFC programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25781
Authors
Dworsky, A., Dasgupta, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Best Practice for States
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institutes website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/housing-young-adults-extende…

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Minor Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving unaccompanied minor youth. The project recommends the following: 1) prevent homelessness by strengthening family, school, and community structures to support youth; 2) quickly provide crisis intervention services and assessment to recently homeless youth; 3) refer to longer-term housing and services for minor youth who cannot immediately return home or to extended family. 

Accession number
25461
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall describes a study to provide an estimate of the size of the homeless youth population and its characteristics in three central Florida counties (Orange, Osceola, and Seminole). Information was also gathered about the types of services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Over three days, the project surveyed youth on the street and in services, which include shelters, transitional living programs, and drop-in centers. In addition, researchers examined data from the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and school systems. Findings include: 1) On a single night in October 2017, there was a total of 268 homeless and unstably housed youth ages 13 to 24 in the three counties. 2) Twelve percent of the surveyed homeless and unstably housed youth were 13 to 17 years old. 3) Youth in the foster care and justice systems were overrepresented in the three counties. 4) Providers in the three counties have 104 shelter, transitional living, rapid rehousing, and subsidized affordable housing slots available for youth, only 10 of which serve youth under age 18. 

Accession number
25739
Authors
Chrisler, A., Horwitz, B., Morton, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/central-florida-count-identifies-se…