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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Texas

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides information on a study conducted in Texas to identify multi-system policy solutions that could prevent youth homelessness or provide for better interventions to ensure youth who encounter homelessness get back on their feet quickly. For this study, researchers interviewed more than 100 young people who had experienced or were experiencing homelessness in Texas, along with more than 50 school homeless liaisons, juvenile justice stakeholders, members of law enforcement, foster care stakeholders, and service providers. In addition, the researchers requested data from Texas agencies that serve youth or have responsibilities on issues related to youth homelessness and conducted research on existing programs and best practices. The study found that young people who encounter homelessness are at high risk of poor outcomes, including educational failure, juvenile or criminal justice involvement, victimization, and health and mental health problems. The report provides recommendations for the various agencies and policy arenas involved in youth homelessness (education, juvenile justice, foster care, and physical and behavioral health) as well as overarching, cross-system recommendations to improve service provision to and outcomes of youth who have experienced homelessness. 

Accession number
25408
Authors
Fowler, D., McDonald, G., Stone, E., Johnson, K., Eby, E., Pulman, H. , Gendron, C., OToole, L., Nowicki, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Texas Appleseed, Austin, TX.

Year published new
2017
Availability

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about key applicable Texas and federal laws on emergency shelter/housing, emancipation, public education, medical treatment, and eligibility for state and federal benefits and how they apply to runaway, homeless, and unaccompanied youth. It also identifies how providers can empower youth voices and help youth understand their rights and responsibilities, as well as appreciate and uinderstand the cultural diversity among homeless youth. The last chapter identifies the benefits of collaborative relationships between youth service agencies and law enforcement and juvenile justice systems. Each section contains answers to freqently asked questions related to each subject and offers general guidelines for most situations. Also included are definitions of common terms and phrases used in the law and by government organizations. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25422
Authors
Texas Network of Youth Services
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for download free of charge on the Texas Network of Youth Services website at http://tnoys.org/wp-content/uploads/Youth-Rights-Guide_New-Version-2.pdf.

The Relationship Between Homelessness and Behavior Problems Among Youth in North Texas: A Brief Report

The Relationship Between Homelessness and Behavior Problems Among Youth in North Texas: A Brief Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the relationship between homelessness and behavior problems in children by comparing families with children who are homeless with families with children who have never been homeless. The researchers obtained data from the Childrens Health Assessment and Planning Survey collected by the Childrens Health System of Texas. The average age of the children participating in the study was 12. By parent report, the researchers collected data on five behaviors regarding their children: arrest and trouble with the police, behavior problems at school, suspension, and suicide attempts. The study found an association between homelessness and higher rates of problem behaviors, including arrests, academic problems, and suicide attempts. Overall, children who were homeless were 36 percent more likely to experience any kind of behavior problem compared with the general population. Since families with children who are dealing with homelessness often seek medical care at emergency departments and health clinics, the authors recommend further research to determine if enhanced identification and screening of homeless youth in clinical settings would reduce the occurrence of behavioral problems in this at-risk population.

Accession number
25463
Authors
Reingle Gonzalez, J. M., Jetelina, K.K., Roberts, M., Otsuki Clutter, M., Sanders, C., Baidhya, S., Tsai, R.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Criminal Justice

Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available by subscription or article purchase at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12103-017-9427-1

State Laws on High School Graduation for Students Experiencing Homelessness

State Laws on High School Graduation for Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about how the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) law of 2015 focuses on high school graduation among students who experience homelessness. A list of amendments to the law related to state requirements for homeless students is included. It provides a summary of existing state laws that complement federal requirements from California, New Mexico, Texas, and Washington. 

Accession number
25453
Authors
Schoolhouse Connection
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoolhouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/statec…

Pretesting a Human Trafficking Screening Tool in the Child Welfare and Runaway and Homeless Youth Systems

Pretesting a Human Trafficking Screening Tool in the Child Welfare and Runaway and Homeless Youth Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Despite the fact that youth involved in the child welfare (CW) and runaway and homeless youth (RHY) systems are particularly vulnerable to being trafficked, there is no consensus screening tool to identify trafficking experiences among such youth. In order to better serve youth trafficking victims, a Human Trafficking Screening Tool (HTST), along with a Short Form version (HTST-SF), was developed and pretested with 617 RHY- and CW-involved youth, ages 12 to 24, across 14 RHY and CW settings in New York, Texas, and Wisconsin in 2016. The survey captured their trafficking experiences as well as demographic characteristics and other life experiences related to trafficking (e.g., running away, drug abuse). Overall, the HTST and HTST-SF performed equally well at capturing trafficking experiences for most youth. Practitioners assessed the tool as easy to administer and the youths responses as truthful and indicating understanding of the questions. Responses to the HTST were correlated to known trafficking risk factors and outcomes, including running away from home, being kicked out of ones home, abusing prescription or over-the-counter drugs, trading sex for something of value on their own, being arrested, and seeking help. In addition, the HTST correctly predicted trafficking victimization. Additional testing of youth under age 18 and youth in CW settings, in addition to further validation work with a nationally representative sample of youth, is recommended. (Author Abstract Modified)  

Accession number
25402
Authors
Dank, M., Yahner, J., Yu, L., Vasquez-Noriega, C., Gelatt, J., Pergamit, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge at HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/257786/Pretesting.pdf.

Experiences of Youth in the Sex Trade in North Texas: Shattered Lives

Experiences of Youth in the Sex Trade in North Texas: Shattered Lives
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report represents one of six site-specific reports from a national multi-site study conducted by the Center for Court Innovation in collaboration with the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention within the U.S. Department of Justice, the study aimed to gain a representative portrait of the lives and needs of youth who are involved in exchanging sex for money, food, housing, drugs, or other goods. To complement the quantitative focus of the national multi-site report, this report and the five other site-specific reports endeavor to provide a rich qualitative account that reveals and gives voice to the experiences, perceptions, and needs of the relevant population. The Dallas researchers conducted interviews with 80 youth, ages 13 to 24, from which they analyzed 78 interviews that met their validity and reliability criteria.  

Accession number
25578
Authors
Martin, M., Champeau, H., Ullrich, S., Johnson, A., Cardarell, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center for Court Innovation

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Center for Court Innovation website at: https://www.courtinnovation.org/sites/default/files/documents/Dallas_0…

Addressing Basic Needs Security in Higher Education: An Introduction to Three Evaluations of Supports for Food and Housing at Community Colleges

Addressing Basic Needs Security in Higher Education: An Introduction to Three Evaluations of Supports for Food and Housing at Community Colleges
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides information about the launch of a three-year evaluation of promising approaches to addressing food and housing insecurity by the Wisconsin HOPE Lab. The researchers plan to work with community college leaders in Boston, Houston, and Tacoma, Washington, to test, refine, and scale efforts to improve the well-being of students and increase their chances of earning degrees. The three programs under evaluation are Meal Vouchers at Bunker Hill Community College, Food Scholarships at Houston Community College, and Housing Vouchers at Tacoma Community College. All three programs were developed by community colleges and their partners based on their local needs, resources, and opportunities. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25620
Authors
Goldrick-Rab, S., Broton, K.M., Hernandez, D.C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2017
Availability

full report available for download on the Hope Center at: https://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Addressing-Basic-Ne…