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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

TANF

Patterns of Benefit Receipt Among Families Who Experience Homelessness

Patterns of Benefit Receipt Among Families Who Experience Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief, from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), compares participation rates in benefit programs of families in the Family Options Study with those of families in poverty from the same counties using American Community survey data. The authors found that families staying in emergency shelter are connected to benefit programs at similar or higher rates than other families in poverty in the same communities. This brief presents some evidence that continued housing instability makes families susceptible to either losing or difficulty accessing public benefits.

Accession number
25719
Authors
Khadduri, J., Burt, M.R., Walton, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the OPRE website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_patterns_of_benef…

Evicted? Doubled Up? Your Child Has the Right to Stay in School! A Know Your Rights Toolkit for Families who Lack Stable Housing

Evicted? Doubled Up? Your Child Has the Right to Stay in School! A Know Your Rights Toolkit for Families who Lack Stable Housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit provides information about how the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act protects the rights of children and youth to stay in their schools while their families are experiencing homelessness or housing instability. It provides resources to help parents understand their children’s educational rights and whom they can contact at the school system level and how to seek legal representation.

Accession number
25730
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the NLCHP website at: https://nlchp.org//wp-content/uploads/2019/02/mvtoolkitfederal2019.pdf

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief, from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), examines whether families experiencing homelessness are connected to the benefits and services of the social safety net. Using data from the Family Options Study, researchers found these families were participating in TANF cash assistance, publicly funded health insurance programs (e.g. Medicaid, CHIP, or other state-funded programs), and SNAP at similar or higher rates than other poor families in the same communities. One exception was WIC where recently homeless families participated at lower rates compared with other families. Twenty months after being in a shelter, most families were no longer homeless but remained poor and continued receiving public benefits. Furthermore, families with recent episodes of homelessness enrolled their preschoolers in early education or center-based care at higher rates than all children in families below the poverty line.

Accession number
25687
Authors
Burt, M.R., Khadduri, J., Gubits, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the OPRE website at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/198426/HomelessSafetyNet.pdf

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report reviews the status of current law in all 50 states and 6 territories related to 13 key issues that affect the lives of unaccompanied youth who experience homelessness. It offers an overview of the range of approaches taken by states since the last update in 2012, and the relative prevalence of these approaches. Key findings include: 1) Many jurisdictions lag behind in implementing changes to federal law that strengthen access to education for youth experiencing homelessness; 2) Punitive approaches to unaccompanied youth are prevalent in many jurisdictions; 3) Definitions of unaccompanied youth often fail to be inclusive, developmentally appropriate, and nonjudgmental; 4) Many jurisdictions authorize or require provision of health care, education, and other services to unaccompanied youth even in the absence of parental consent; and 5) Most jurisdictions provide youth with some ability to act on their own behalf. This collaborative publication from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and the National Network for Youth recommends policy changes to help protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness, and thus increase their prospects for positive future outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25715
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and National Network for Youth

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Network for Youth website at: https://www.nn4youth.org/wp-content/uploads/Alone-Without-A-Home-2019.p…