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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Stress

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This supplement to the 2018 Children’s Mental Health Report from the Child Mind Institute provides suggestions on how to talk about difficult subjects with teens. It discusses how to maintain ongoing conversations about normal fears, how persistent anxiety can develop into a disorder, and why early treatment is best. This guide describes how adults can build rapport with teens by being curious without being judgmental, showing trust, being collaborative, giving praise, and staying calm. It covers general anxiety; social anxiety; social media risks and rewards; anxiety and substance abuse; anxiety disorder, depression, and suicidality; and treatment.

Accession number
25778
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Child Mind Institute

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Mind Institute website at: https://childmind.org/downloads/CMHR_2018_Supplement.pdf

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Laying the Groundwork for Trauma-Informed Care

Laying the Groundwork for Trauma-Informed Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Center for Health Care Strategies outlines practical recommendations for health care organizations that would like to become more trauma informed. Using data from the pilot study sites of the Advancing Trauma-Informed Care national initiative, this brief offers a starting point for health care organizations to generate buy-in for trauma-informed care, educate staff about secondary traumatic stress, improve hiring practices, and enhance the physical, social, and emotional environments for patients with histories of trauma. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25742
Authors
Schulman, M., Menschner, C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Health Strategies

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the CHCS website at: https://www.chcs.org/resource/laying-groundwork-trauma-informed-care/

Building the Core Skills Youth Need for Life: A Guide for Education and Social Service Practitioners

Building the Core Skills Youth Need for Life: A Guide for Education and Social Service Practitioners
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University provides information for practitioners who work with adolescents about the science behind how young people develop the core skills needed for life and learning. These skills include planning, focus, self-control, awareness, and flexibility. The guide includes five ways practitioners can help youth build these skills. It also summarizes how stress affects adolescent brain development and how to deliver services that reduce stress. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25763
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/building-core-skills-yout…

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University discusses how child welfare systems can use developmental science to better support the children, families, and communities that they serve. The Center intended this report for leaders of public child welfare agencies; private, nonprofit organizations; juvenile and family courts; and legislative committees that work on public policy related to child welfare. The first part of this report focuses on child development and how adversity, such as toxic stress, can disrupt healthy development. The second part outlines how developmental science can improve outcomes in three ways: reduce external sources of stress, develop responsive relationships, and strengthen core life skills. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25764
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Series
Science to Policy and Practice
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/child-welfare-systems/