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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Strength-based Approaches

Strengths-based Outreach and Advocacy for Non-service-connected Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Strengths-based Outreach and Advocacy for Non-service-connected Youth Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book chapter describes a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention for homeless youth who are not connected to services. Research suggests that less than 10 percent of homeless youth are connected to services. This means that much less is known about this population than is known about homeless youth who access services such as shelters and drop-in centers. Service-disconnected youth have more unmet needs and more severe substance use and mental health problems. Efforts to connect youth to services are essential to prevent a range of public health consequences associated with homelessness, including premature death. Key components of strengths-based outreach and advocacy include a dual focus on youth and environment; use of paraprofessional personnel; focus on youths strengths rather than deficits, and giving youth a high degree of responsibility in directing and influencing the intervention they receive. Initial research indicates that a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention can be effective with homeless youth. The relationship between advocate and youth is key to success and is an important focus.    

Accession number
25437
Authors
Slesnick, N., Van Hest, E.
Type new
Book Chapter
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook.pdf.

Homeless Adolescents Perceptions of Positive Development: A Comparative Study

Homeless Adolescents Perceptions of Positive Development: A Comparative Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used an inductive approach to examine adolescents’ views on positive development and their personal strengths and well-being. The study investigated the qualitative differences in perspective from two youth samples: youth who were homeless and youth participating in a residential 4-H program. The study recruited 38 young people from homeless shelters and a 4-H program to participate in focus groups. After conducting a content analysis of the narrative responses, the researchers found differences between these two groups in the areas of happiness, family support, identity, personal strengths, and risk avoidance. The findings indicate that homeless youth adapt to limiting ecologies, such as non-supportive parents, by seeking supportive relationships elsewhere as well as adjusting their views of happiness. The homeless youth also demonstrated more internal self-awareness compared with the 4-H adolescents. The authors conclude that by recognizing and capitalizing on the unique perspectives and strengths of adolescents from divergent environments, positive youth development and strengths-based programs and theory can more effectively benefit youth from diverse backgrounds. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25522
Authors
Dolenc Nott, B., Vuchinich, S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Youth Care Forum

Volume new
45
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available for download at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-016-9361-2

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth

Employment and Other Income Sources Among Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined income sources among homeless youth who are not connected to homeless service agencies. The sample of 72 youth, ages 14 to 24, reported three months of continuous homelessness and no service connection before participating in the study. The researchers looked at changes in employment and income over time as a result of implementing the Strengths-Based Outreach and Advocacy (SBOA) approach. They define this outreach model as one that emphasizes the relationship between outreach workers and their clients and focuses on strengths rather than pathologies. The results show an increase in employment and legal income from non-survival behaviors while income from survival behaviors decreased. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25782
Authors
Slesnick, N., Zhang, J., Yilmazer, T.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

The Journal of Primary Prevention

Volume new
39
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with journal subscription or article purchase at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10935-018-0511-1

Assessing the Meaningful Inclusion of Youth Voice in Policy and Practice: State of the Science

Assessing the Meaningful Inclusion of Youth Voice in Policy and Practice: State of the Science
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is part of the 2018 State-of-the-Science Series from the Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures at Portland State University. The author discusses the current move toward including young people’s voices in the design and delivery of services for youth and young adults and the need for updated tools and frameworks to assist service-providing programs, agencies, and systems in evaluating their efforts in this area. Despite agreeing with the general purpose and principles for youth and young adult voice inclusion in organizations and systems, stakeholders may lack awareness of the policies and practices required to ensure the consistent and meaningful engagement of youth as participants in decision-making processes. The author reviews the state-of-the-science on how to support meaningful participation of young people in organizations and systems, the existing assessment tools, and introduce two new measures for agency- and system-level self-assessment of the conditions that support the meaningful inclusion of youth voice. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25631
Authors
Blakeslee, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University

Series
State-of-the-Science Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Portland State University PDXScholar website at: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1230&con…