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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Street Youth

Socioeconomic Factors Associated With Cessation of Injection Drug Use Among Street-Involved Youth

Socioeconomic Factors Associated With Cessation of Injection Drug Use Among Street-Involved Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to identify socioeconomic factors associated with cessation of injection drug use among street-involved use in Vancouver, Canada. The researchers used data collected from September 2005 to May 2015 as part of a prospective study known as the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS). Among the 383 participants, nearly 45 percent of the youth reported quitting injection use during the reporting period. The findings suggest that socioeconomic factors, particularly engagement in prohibited street-based and illegal income-generating activities, may pose barriers to ceasing injection drug use among this population. The researchers conclude that improving access to stable and secure income, as well as employment opportunities, may help youth transition from injection drug use.

Accession number
25592
Authors
Chang, D.C., Hadland, S.E., Nosova, E., Wood, E., Kerr, T., DeBeck, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Substance Abuse Treatment Prevention and Policy

Volume new
12
Year published new
2017
Availability

Six-Year Mortality in a Street-Recruited Cohort of Homeless Youth in San Francisco, California

Six-Year Mortality in a Street-Recruited Cohort of Homeless Youth in San Francisco, California
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

This journal article describes a longitudinal study of street youth ages 15 to 24 in San Francisco, California, from 2004 to 2011. From the original cohort of 218 participants, 11 youth died during the six-year study, which is nearly a 10 percent mortality rate. Most deaths were due to suicide and/or alcohol and drug abuse. This mortality rate is more than ten times that of the mortality rate of the general youth population in California. The researchers conclude that additional services and programs are needed to provide housing and substance abuse intervention to prevent premature deaths among this vulnerable population.

Accession number
25591
Authors
Auerswald, C. L., Lin, J.S., Parriott, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

PeerJ

Year published new
2016
Availability

A PDF of this article is available on the National Center for Biotechnology Information website at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4841235/pdf/peerj-04-1909…

Reflecting on Participatory, Action-Oriented Research Methods in Community Pscyhology: Progress, Problems, and Paths Forward

Reflecting on Participatory, Action-Oriented Research Methods in Community Pscyhology: Progress, Problems, and Paths Forward
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents an analysis of how participatory action research (PAR) methods pertain to community psychology. Following a brief review of the fundamental aspects of PAR, the authors examine the key developments in the field, including how PAR methods have been used to engage street-involved youth. The article provides three illustrative case studies of programs in the areas of youth homelessness, consumer/survivor engagement, and Indigenous research to demonstrate contemporary challenges and opportunities. The authors argue that without an effort to reconsider and redefine PAR, moving away from the stereotypical PAR “project” framework, these methods will continue to be poorly represented and underutilized in community psychology. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25541
Authors
Kidd, S., Davidson, L., Frederick, T., Kral, M.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
61
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ajcp.12214

Missed Opportunities in Youth Pathways Through Homelessness

Missed Opportunities in Youth Pathways Through Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the sixth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents data from the in-depth interview component of the Voices of Youth Count report. The researchers conducted 215 interviews with youth, ages 13 to 25, from five diverse counties across the United States: Cook County, Illinois; Philadelphia County, PA; San Diego County, CA; Travis County, TX; and Walla Walla County, WA. The findings show young people who deal with housing instability experience significant adversity, family disruption, and interpersonal trauma both before and after their homelessness. This brief recommends revisions within the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Authorizing Legislation (RHYA) based on these findings.

Accession number
25840
Authors
Samuels, G.M., Cerven, C., Curry, S., Robinson, S.R., Patel, S.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: http://voicesofyouthcount.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ChapinHall_VoY…

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall describes a study to provide an estimate of the size of the homeless youth population and its characteristics in three central Florida counties (Orange, Osceola, and Seminole). Information was also gathered about the types of services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Over three days, the project surveyed youth on the street and in services, which include shelters, transitional living programs, and drop-in centers. In addition, researchers examined data from the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and school systems. Findings include: 1) On a single night in October 2017, there was a total of 268 homeless and unstably housed youth ages 13 to 24 in the three counties. 2) Twelve percent of the surveyed homeless and unstably housed youth were 13 to 17 years old. 3) Youth in the foster care and justice systems were overrepresented in the three counties. 4) Providers in the three counties have 104 shelter, transitional living, rapid rehousing, and subsidized affordable housing slots available for youth, only 10 of which serve youth under age 18. 

Accession number
25739
Authors
Chrisler, A., Horwitz, B., Morton, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/central-florida-count-identifies-se…