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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Social Workers

Promoting Permanency for Older Youth in Out-of-Home Care

Promoting Permanency for Older Youth in Out-of-Home Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Children’s Bureau provides information for child welfare professionals about the importance of permanency planning for youth. This planning should include both legal permanency, such as decisions about reunification versus adoption, and relational permanency, such as identifying caring adults in the youth’s life. These adults may provide long-term support that can help youth transition to adulthood and may become a legal permanent option. The brief covers current federal legislation that supports youth permanency as well as strategies for permanency planning with youth. These include involving youth in permanency planning, strengthening reunification services, and helping youth maintain or establish relationships with kin.

Accession number
25844
Type new
Brief
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free on the Child Welfare Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/bulletins_permanency.pdf

Human Trafficking and Child Welfare: A Guide for Caseworkers

Human Trafficking and Child Welfare: A Guide for Caseworkers
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Children’s Bureau looks at how child welfare caseworkers can identify and support children and youth who are victims of human trafficking and those who are at increased risk for victimization. It provides background information about the issue, strategies caseworkers can use to identify and support victims and potential victims, and tools and resources to assist them in this effort.

Accession number
25749
Type new
Brief
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trafficking_caseworkers.pdf

Family Separation, Reunification, and Intergenerational Trauma in the Aftermath of Human Trafficking in the United States

Family Separation, Reunification, and Intergenerational Trauma in the Aftermath of Human Trafficking in the United States
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the implications of family separation as a result of human trafficking and migration. The authors conduct a literature review about the possible intergenerational transmission of trauma in the aftermath of human trafficking and family reunification. This article aims to connect research on family separation and reunification in relation to migration with the little research that exists about family reunification and trafficking survivors. The authors use the perspective of social service providers to explain how families move from crisis back to balance. They discuss family resiliency frameworks as empowering models for serving survivors of human trafficking and their families during the reunification process. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25625
Authors
Juabsamai, K., Taylor, I.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Anti-Trafficking Review

Year published new
2018

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University discusses how child welfare systems can use developmental science to better support the children, families, and communities that they serve. The Center intended this report for leaders of public child welfare agencies; private, nonprofit organizations; juvenile and family courts; and legislative committees that work on public policy related to child welfare. The first part of this report focuses on child development and how adversity, such as toxic stress, can disrupt healthy development. The second part outlines how developmental science can improve outcomes in three ways: reduce external sources of stress, develop responsive relationships, and strengthen core life skills. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25764
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Series
Science to Policy and Practice
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/child-welfare-systems/