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Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound

Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This collaborative report from the National Wraparound Initiative and the Pathways Research and Training Center at Portland State looks at how providers modify the Wraparound approach when working with older youth and young adults. The authors conducted a qualitative analysis by conducting interviews with facilitators, peer support providers, and program managers in eight states. This report presents a summary of these interviews and offers suggestions for training and technical assistance for Wraparound programs working with older youth and adults based on these findings. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25777
Authors
Walker, J.S., Baird, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Wraparound Initiative and Research and Training Center on Pathways to Positive Futures

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Childrens Mental Health Network website at: https://www.cmhnetwork.org/resources/10298/

The Relative Influence of Injunctive and Descriptive Social Norms on Methamphetamine, Heroin, and Injection Drug Use Among Homeless Youth: The Impact of Different Referent Groups

The Relative Influence of Injunctive and Descriptive Social Norms on Methamphetamine, Heroin, and Injection Drug Use Among Homeless Youth: The Impact of Different Referent Groups
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that applied social network theory to understand how different types of social network norms, along with individual demographic and socioeconomic variables, are associated with recent use of methamphetamine, heroin, and intravenous drugs among homeless youth. The study assessed the relative influence of both injunctive and descriptive norms in the context of different referent groups (i.e., family, street peers, home-based peers, and staff members) on methamphetamine, heroin, and injection drug use behaviors of homeless youth in the past 30 days. The researchers collected cross-sectional data from a sample of 911 homeless youth, ages 14 to 25, at three drop-in centers in Los Angeles. The study consisted of two parts: a social network interview and a computerized self-administered survey. Findings indicate the need to carefully consider the diversity of homeless youths’ networks in designing substance use interventions. Furthermore, the researchers contend that the injunctive norms (i.e., objections to drug use) are associated with reduced drug use and should be considered when developing substance use interventions. Most interventions use social or descriptive norms that focus on changing the perceptions of the prevalence of drug use behavior or altering the drug user’s existing social network.

Accession number
25565
Authors
Barman-Adhikari, A., Craddock, J., Bowen, E., Das, R., Rice, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Drug Issues

Volume new
48
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download via purchase or subscription at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022042617726080

Social Support Networks and the Mental Health of Runaway and Homeless Youth

Social Support Networks and the Mental Health of Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the relationship between personal support network resources and mental health among runaway and homeless youth. The survey results from 693 participants in Atlanta, Georgia, indicate that more supportive network ties reduce the risk of symptoms of severe mental illness among youth who have been homeless. The study found that those young people homeless for more than 6 months reported having fewer personal network resources. According to the authors, the most significant finding was that age was an independently negative factor for certain types of support resources. That is, the older youth had less support from friends and coworkers than their younger peers. These findings suggest that increased isolation and fewer resources may negatively affect the mental and well-being of runaway and homeless youth as they grow older and stay on the street longer. 

Accession number
25465
Authors
Wright, E.R., Attell, B.K., Ruel, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Social Sciences

Volume new
6
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download at: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/6/4/117

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

A Social Capital Approach to Identifying Correlates of Perceived Social Support Among Homeless Youth

A Social Capital Approach to Identifying Correlates of Perceived Social Support Among Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to characterize the social support networks of homeless youth and identify salient correlates of these different sources of social support. The authors recruited a sample of 1,046 youth, ages 13 to 24, from three homeless youth drop-in centers in Los Angeles. The participants completed a computerized self-administered survey and a social network interview. The researchers examined whether homelessness backgrounds, victimization experiences, and risky behaviors were associated with different emotional and instrumental forms of social capital. They defined social capital as the ability of homeless youth to accumulate resources through their personal relationships. Among this sample, the rates of emotional support were greater than instrumental support; however, the rates of overall social capital were low, with only about 25 percent reporting support from any one source. These findings suggest the need for careful consideration of support systems when providing services to homeless youth. Specifically, it may be important to assess the common supports used by youth to help them develop and maintain their social networks. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25512
Authors
Barman-Adhikari, A., Bowen, E., Bender, K., Brown, S., Rice, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Youth Care Forum

Volume new
45
Year published new
2016
Availability

Article available for download online at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-016-9352-3