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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Social Services

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides information on a study conducted in Texas to identify multi-system policy solutions that could prevent youth homelessness or provide for better interventions to ensure youth who encounter homelessness get back on their feet quickly. For this study, researchers interviewed more than 100 young people who had experienced or were experiencing homelessness in Texas, along with more than 50 school homeless liaisons, juvenile justice stakeholders, members of law enforcement, foster care stakeholders, and service providers. In addition, the researchers requested data from Texas agencies that serve youth or have responsibilities on issues related to youth homelessness and conducted research on existing programs and best practices. The study found that young people who encounter homelessness are at high risk of poor outcomes, including educational failure, juvenile or criminal justice involvement, victimization, and health and mental health problems. The report provides recommendations for the various agencies and policy arenas involved in youth homelessness (education, juvenile justice, foster care, and physical and behavioral health) as well as overarching, cross-system recommendations to improve service provision to and outcomes of youth who have experienced homelessness. 

Accession number
25408
Authors
Fowler, D., McDonald, G., Stone, E., Johnson, K., Eby, E., Pulman, H. , Gendron, C., OToole, L., Nowicki, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Texas Appleseed, Austin, TX.

Year published new
2017
Availability

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents results from a statistical analysis examining the relationship between indicators of substance use prevalence and child welfare caseloads. The analysis used data on child welfare caseload rates and indicators of substance use prevalence from 2011 through 2016 for most U.S. counties. The study found that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a positive relationship with child welfare caseload rates, after accounting for county socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. These substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Increases in rates of overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations are associated wwith a higher proportion of children entering foster care after reports of child maltreatment. Opioid-related hospitalization rates have a relationship with caseload rates comparable to that of other substance types, though alcohol has a stronger relationship than any illicit or prescription substance. Although there is a positive association between the substance use measures and child welfare caseload rates, this association cannot be positively identified as causal. Substance use, including opioid misuse, has downstream effects on childrens welfare and family stability, and these in turn can place a substantial burden on communities. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25426
Authors
Ghertner, R., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Radel, L., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/relationship-between-substance-use-indi….

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings From a Mixed Methods Study

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings From a Mixed Methods Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents key findings from a mixed methods study examining how substance use affects child welfare systems across the country. The study combined statistical modeling and qualitative data collection which documented the perspectives and experiences of child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, judges and other legal professionals, law enforcement officials, and other service providers. Results indicate that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a statistical relationship with child welfare caseloads (i.e., rates of child protective services reports, substantiated reports, and foster care placements). Generally, counties with higher overdose death and drug hospitalization rates have higher caseload rates. In addition, these substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Several major challenges affect how child welfare agencies and families interact with substance use treatment options, including medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Family-friendly treatment options are limited, and caseworkers, courts, and other providers often misunderstand how treatment works and lack guidelines on how to incorporate it into child welfare practice. Child welfare agencies and their community partners are struggling to meet families needs. Haphazard substance use assessment practices, barriers to collaboration with substance use treatment providers and other stakeholders, and shortages of foster homes and trained staff undermine the effectiveness of agencies responses to families. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25425
Authors
Radel, L., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Ghertner, R., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/substance-use-opioid-epidemic-and-child…

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and Child Welfare Caseloads: Methodological Details From a Mixed Methods Study

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and Child Welfare Caseloads: Methodological Details From a Mixed Methods Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents key findings from a mixed methods study examining how substance use affects child welfare systems across the country. The study combined statistical modeling and qualitative data collection which documented the perspectives and experiences of child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, judges and other legal professionals, law enforcement officials, and other service providers. Results indicate that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a statistical relationship with child welfare caseloads (i.e., rates of child protective services reports, substantiated reports, and foster care placements). Generally, counties with higher overdose death and drug hospitalization rates have higher caseload rates. In addition, these substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Several major challenges affect how child welfare agencies and families interact with substance use treatment options, including medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Family-friendly treatment options are limited, and caseworkers, courts, and other providers often misunderstand how treatment works and lack guidelines on how to incorporate it into child welfare practice. Child welfare agencies and their community partners are struggling to meet families needs. Haphazard substance use assessment practices, barriers to collaboration with substance use treatment providers and other stakeholders, and shortages of foster homes and trained staff undermine the effectiveness of agencies responses to families. The report includes discussion guides for child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, and other administrators and practitioners. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25560
Authors
Waters, A., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Ghertner, R., Radel, L.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assitant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/259241/MethodologicalDetailsMixed…

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined predictors of meetings with outreach workers among 79 homeless youth, ages 14 to 24, who self-reported substance use and were not currently connected to any supportive services. The study found the following factors predicted higher meeting frequency with an outreach worker: 1) being an older homeless youth, 2) not using hard drugs within the past 30 days, 3) experiencing higher levels of depressive symptoms, and 4) reporting fewer drug-related problems. The authors discuss how understanding what predicts outreach engagement can improve service providers ability to connect marginalized youth to resources to reduce unhealthy and dangerous risk behaviors. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25469
Authors
Carmona, J., Slesnick, N., Guo, X., Murnan, A., Brakenhoff, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Community Mental Health Journal

Volume new
53
Year published new
2017
Availability

The full-text article is available for download via purchase or subscription: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10597-015-9919-8

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving older homeless youth. The project recommends the following: 1) help youth develop and navigate supportive relationships with family, peers, and other caring adults; 2) offer multiple housing options with developmentally appropriate services; 3) guide youth as they connect to mainstream services; and 4) adequately train and support frontline staff.

Accession number
25460
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…

Developmental Consequences of Homelessness for Young Parents and Their Children

Developmental Consequences of Homelessness for Young Parents and Their Children
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article introduces the topic of homelessness among young people who are parenting young children. According to the data presented in this article, 12 to 27% of families who experience homelessness are headed by a parent under age 25, and most have children under age 6. The authors discuss how homelessness can interfere with the optimal health and development for both the young parents and their children. They suggest developmentally appropriate services and supports for both the parents and children that include resources to help them become economically self-sufficient. The authors discuss the two-generation approach that typically involves education, career training, and employment opportunities as well as programs for parent and child health and well-being. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25830
Authors
Kull, M.A., Dworsky, A, Horwitz, B., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Zero to Three Journal

Volume new
39
Year published new
2019
Availability

Building Systems of Integrated Student Support: A Policy Brief for Local and State Leaders

Building Systems of Integrated Student Support: A Policy Brief for Local and State Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Center for Promise at Boston University in collaboration with the Center for Optimized Student Support at Boston College provides an overview of how integrated student support (ISS) systems help promote academic success and improve life outcomes by removing barriers and coordinating services and resources. The brief provides policymakers and stakeholders at the state and local levels with policy recommendations and guidance about ISS for children, youth, and families. This brief includes examples of ISS systems implemented at state and local levels.

Accession number
25723
Authors
J. Wasser Gish
Type new
Brief
Organization

Americas Promise Alliance

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Americas Promise Alliance website at: https://www.americaspromise.org/resource/building-systems-integrated-st…

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief, from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), examines whether families experiencing homelessness are connected to the benefits and services of the social safety net. Using data from the Family Options Study, researchers found these families were participating in TANF cash assistance, publicly funded health insurance programs (e.g. Medicaid, CHIP, or other state-funded programs), and SNAP at similar or higher rates than other poor families in the same communities. One exception was WIC where recently homeless families participated at lower rates compared with other families. Twenty months after being in a shelter, most families were no longer homeless but remained poor and continued receiving public benefits. Furthermore, families with recent episodes of homelessness enrolled their preschoolers in early education or center-based care at higher rates than all children in families below the poverty line.

Accession number
25687
Authors
Burt, M.R., Khadduri, J., Gubits, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the OPRE website at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/198426/HomelessSafetyNet.pdf

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the intersection between system-involved youth and runaway and homeless youth. It cites data from interviews with 656 runaway and homeless youth (ages 14 to 21) in 11 cities that show nearly 78 percent of the participants had at least one interaction with law enforcement. In addition, 7 percent of survey participants directly attributed their first homelessness experience with exiting jail or prison. In Part I of the report, the authors describe each of the 10 Principles of Change developed by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in collaboration with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The principles provide a roadmap for communities to help young people avoid experiencing juvenile justice system involvement or youth homelessness. In Part II, the report gives specific resources and examples related to each Principle of Change. Appendix I outlines a case study of Davidson County, Tennessee, as a juvenile court system working to decriminalize and address youth homelessness. Appendix II describes state-level efforts in Maryland, South Carolina, and Vermont that focus on homelessness among system-involved youth. 

Accession number
25457
Authors
Pilnik, L., Bardine, D., Furr, L., Maury, M., Sickmund, M., Smoot, N., Szanyi, J,
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/FINAL%20Pr…