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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Service Utilization

YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth

YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study with the objective to develop a mobile app, called YTH StreetConnect, to support homeless and unstably housed (H/UH) youth and their providers in accessing health care and vital resources. In Phase I, the researchers conducted a literature review on mobile phone and internet usage by H/UH youth and interviewed H/UH providers to inform the app prototype development process. In Phase II, they conducted focus groups with H/UH youth participants to test the usability of the YTH StreetConnect app. From the usability testing, participants proposed improvements to the app, including visual updates to the user interface, map icons, new underrepresented resource categories, and the addition of a peer-rating system. The study found that YTH StreetConnect is a promising way to increase service utilization, provide referral access, and share resources among H/UH youth and providers. The feedback garnered from H/UH youth and providers offers insights on how to improve future models of YTH StreetConnect and similar programs that assist H/UH youth.

Accession number
25564
Authors
Sheoran, B., Silva, C.L., Lykens, J.E., Gamedze, L., Williams, S., Ford, J.V., Habel, M.A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Volume new
4
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available online free of charge: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965613/

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report looks at the relationship between extended foster care and young adult outcomes. The researchers analyzed data from three national datasets on foster care history, independent living services, and extended foster care. They found that extended foster care is associated with better young adult outcomes and receipt of independent youth services. Despite the low rates of utilization in many states, extended foster care appears to benefit young people as they transition to adulthood. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25757
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ExtendedFosterCa…

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), looks at whether family characteristics can identify repeated or persistent experiences of homelessness before and after a shelter stay. OPRE analyzed data of 2,282 families from the larger Family Options Study to determine if practitioners in the field can identify families who will experience repeated or persistent homelessness and thus will need additional support.

Accession number
25714
Authors
Glendening, Z., Shinn, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_persistent_homele…

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a national study of 215 youth, ages 13 to 25, experiencing housing instability in five US counties. The researchers used life-course interviews, a housing timeline tool, and background survey data to explore the participants use and rejection of both formal and informal resources. From their analysis, the researchers created a model of “youth logics of engagement” that shaped how youth interpreted the costs versus benefits of using available resources. The model includes the interrelated factors of identity protection, accumulated experience, and personal agency. The researchers contend youth may unintentionally expose themselves to physical risks by avoiding resources they believe might comprise their emotional, psychological, or relational well-being.

Accession number
25664
Authors
Samuels, G.M., Cerven, C., Curry, S.R., Robinson, S.R.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire journal issue available free of charge on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Healthcare Barriers and Utilization Among Adolescents and Young Adults Accessing Services for Homeless and Runaway Youth

Healthcare Barriers and Utilization Among Adolescents and Young Adults Accessing Services for Homeless and Runaway Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to determine the impact of discrete barriers to accessing healthcare among homeless youth. The researchers administered a survey about healthcare barriers and utilization to 180 respondents accessing services at three community centers for homeless and runaway youth. This study explores associations between barriers and three healthcare utilization outcomes: 1) a doctor’s visit in the past 12 months outside of an emergency department (ED) or urgent care clinic, 2) a regular healthcare provider, and 3) frequency of ED or urgent care visits. The most commonly reported barriers were “I don’t have a ride,” “no insurance,” and “costs too much.” Less than 5 percent of the youth reported any fear-based barriers, such as “I don’t trust the doctors.” Significant predictors of having seen a doctor in the past 12 months included sexual minority status and having health insurance. Female respondents were more than five times likely to have a regular healthcare provider. These results underscore the need to clearly define healthcare outcomes when investigating barriers to care among homeless and runaway youth as the impact of discrete barriers varies depending on the outcome of focus. 

Accession number
25532
Authors
Chelvakumar, G., Ford, N., Kapa, H.M., Lange, H.L.H., McRee, A., Bonny, A.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
42
Year published new
2017
Availability

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief, from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), examines whether families experiencing homelessness are connected to the benefits and services of the social safety net. Using data from the Family Options Study, researchers found these families were participating in TANF cash assistance, publicly funded health insurance programs (e.g. Medicaid, CHIP, or other state-funded programs), and SNAP at similar or higher rates than other poor families in the same communities. One exception was WIC where recently homeless families participated at lower rates compared with other families. Twenty months after being in a shelter, most families were no longer homeless but remained poor and continued receiving public benefits. Furthermore, families with recent episodes of homelessness enrolled their preschoolers in early education or center-based care at higher rates than all children in families below the poverty line.

Accession number
25687
Authors
Burt, M.R., Khadduri, J., Gubits, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the OPRE website at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/198426/HomelessSafetyNet.pdf