Skip to main content
National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Service Needs

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning

Youth Engagement in Child Welfare Service Planning
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults. This initiative is called the Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH). This issue brief looks at methods YARH grantees used to engage youth in the development of new comprehensive service models intended to reduce homelessness among youth who are in or formerly in foster care. The brief provides samples of YARH grantees activities. (abstract modified)

Accession number
25732
Authors
Gothro, A., Caplan, V.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Issue Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides information on a study conducted in Texas to identify multi-system policy solutions that could prevent youth homelessness or provide for better interventions to ensure youth who encounter homelessness get back on their feet quickly. For this study, researchers interviewed more than 100 young people who had experienced or were experiencing homelessness in Texas, along with more than 50 school homeless liaisons, juvenile justice stakeholders, members of law enforcement, foster care stakeholders, and service providers. In addition, the researchers requested data from Texas agencies that serve youth or have responsibilities on issues related to youth homelessness and conducted research on existing programs and best practices. The study found that young people who encounter homelessness are at high risk of poor outcomes, including educational failure, juvenile or criminal justice involvement, victimization, and health and mental health problems. The report provides recommendations for the various agencies and policy arenas involved in youth homelessness (education, juvenile justice, foster care, and physical and behavioral health) as well as overarching, cross-system recommendations to improve service provision to and outcomes of youth who have experienced homelessness. 

Accession number
25408
Authors
Fowler, D., McDonald, G., Stone, E., Johnson, K., Eby, E., Pulman, H. , Gendron, C., OToole, L., Nowicki, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Texas Appleseed, Austin, TX.

Year published new
2017
Availability

Varied Progress Toward Comprehensive Service Models and Evaluations

Varied Progress Toward Comprehensive Service Models and Evaluations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. This brief is part of a series that summarizes high-level themes from a process study of YARH grantees’ activities and accomplishments during Phase I. This information was gleaned from grant applications, grantees’ semi-annual progress reports, and two-day site visits to each grantee. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25494
Authors
Fung, N., Gothro, A., Knas, E., Bradley, M.C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) In the Spotlight
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents results from a statistical analysis examining the relationship between indicators of substance use prevalence and child welfare caseloads. The analysis used data on child welfare caseload rates and indicators of substance use prevalence from 2011 through 2016 for most U.S. counties. The study found that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a positive relationship with child welfare caseload rates, after accounting for county socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. These substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Increases in rates of overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations are associated wwith a higher proportion of children entering foster care after reports of child maltreatment. Opioid-related hospitalization rates have a relationship with caseload rates comparable to that of other substance types, though alcohol has a stronger relationship than any illicit or prescription substance. Although there is a positive association between the substance use measures and child welfare caseload rates, this association cannot be positively identified as causal. Substance use, including opioid misuse, has downstream effects on childrens welfare and family stability, and these in turn can place a substantial burden on communities. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25426
Authors
Ghertner, R., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Radel, L., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/relationship-between-substance-use-indi….

Screening for Human Trafficking among Homeless Young Adults

Screening for Human Trafficking among Homeless Young Adults
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop a screening tool for sex trafficking, labor trafficking, or both among homeless young adults. It also looked at whether homeless youth who have experienced trafficking have different needs than those who have not. The researchers pretested a screening tool with 307 participants, ages 18 to 22, who were receiving services from Covenant House in New Jersey. From this testing, they validated Quick Youth Indicators for Trafficking (QYIT), a user-friendly screening tool that does not require trafficking expertise to administer in the field. During this process, the researchers found that labor trafficking is a significant form of trafficking among homeless youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25754
Authors
Chisolm-Straker, M., Sze, J., Einbond, J., White, J., Stoklosa, H.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
98
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download from journal homepage at: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740918307540?via…

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), looks at whether family characteristics can identify repeated or persistent experiences of homelessness before and after a shelter stay. OPRE analyzed data of 2,282 families from the larger Family Options Study to determine if practitioners in the field can identify families who will experience repeated or persistent homelessness and thus will need additional support.

Accession number
25714
Authors
Glendening, Z., Shinn, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_persistent_homele…

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the service needs of young adults who are experiencing homelessness while they are also pregnant or parenting. The researchers used data from a survey of homeless and unstably housed young adults, ages 18 to 24, collected over four weeks to examine the characteristics, risk factors, and protective factors of homeless parents (n=109) compared with other homeless young adults (n=243). They further compared differences between mothers (n=61) and fathers (n=48). The study identifies unique risk factors and protective profiles for homeless parents and discusses the implications for service delivery needs of this subpopulation of homeless youth.

Accession number
25685
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Jennings, S.W., Maria, D.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Families in Society

Volume new
97
Year published new
2016

Federal and Local Efforts to Support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Federal and Local Efforts to Support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families, funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to better understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. During the initial implementation phase, grantees are refining and testing their comprehensive models. This issue brief discusses the rationale for the YARH grant program and the supports the Children’s Bureau provides the grantees through the multiple phases.

Accession number
25734
Authors
Knas, E., Stagner, M., Bradley, M.C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

This article presents findings from a cross-sectional, qualitative, descriptive study, grounded in the positive youth development approach and the Youth Program Quality Assessment model, to examine the effectiveness of specialized settings designed to serve runaway and homeless youth (RHY). From a larger sample of 29 RHY-specific settings across New York State, youth ages 16 to 21 (n=37) from 11 settings were purposively sampled for semi-structured in-depth interviews on their transitions into homelessness, experiences in RHY-settings, and unmet needs. The findings show the population-tailored approaches of RHY-specific settings are vital to engaging and serving RHY due to this uniquely challenged population that is often distrustful of service settings and professional adults and skilled at surviving independently. Four major themes regarding the positive effects of RHY settings emerged: 1) engaging with an RHY setting was emotionally challenging and frightening for youth, and thus the experiences of safety and services tailored to RHY needs were critical; 2) instrumental support from staff was vital and most effective when received in a context of emotional support; 3) RHY were skilled at survival on the streets, but benefited from socialization into more traditional systems to foster future independent living; and 4) follow-through and aftercare were needed as youth transitioned out of services. With respect to gaps in settings, the RHY participants discussed their desire for more balance between needing structure and wanting autonomy and the lack of RHY input into program governance. This study advances the understanding of RHY, their service needs, and the ways settings meet these needs.

Accession number
25535
Authors
Gwadz, M., Freeman, R.M., Kutnick, A.H., Silverman, E., Ritchie, A.S., Cleland, C.M., Leonard, N.R., Sringagesh, A., Powlovich, J., Bolas, J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Frontiers in Public Health

Series
Children and Health
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00112/full