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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Service Delivery

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas

Young, Alone, and Homeless in the Lone Star State: Policy Solutions to End Youth Homelessness in Texas
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides information on a study conducted in Texas to identify multi-system policy solutions that could prevent youth homelessness or provide for better interventions to ensure youth who encounter homelessness get back on their feet quickly. For this study, researchers interviewed more than 100 young people who had experienced or were experiencing homelessness in Texas, along with more than 50 school homeless liaisons, juvenile justice stakeholders, members of law enforcement, foster care stakeholders, and service providers. In addition, the researchers requested data from Texas agencies that serve youth or have responsibilities on issues related to youth homelessness and conducted research on existing programs and best practices. The study found that young people who encounter homelessness are at high risk of poor outcomes, including educational failure, juvenile or criminal justice involvement, victimization, and health and mental health problems. The report provides recommendations for the various agencies and policy arenas involved in youth homelessness (education, juvenile justice, foster care, and physical and behavioral health) as well as overarching, cross-system recommendations to improve service provision to and outcomes of youth who have experienced homelessness. 

Accession number
25408
Authors
Fowler, D., McDonald, G., Stone, E., Johnson, K., Eby, E., Pulman, H. , Gendron, C., OToole, L., Nowicki, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Texas Appleseed, Austin, TX.

Year published new
2017
Availability

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about the Housing First for Youth (HF4Y) program model. HF4Y is a rights-based intervention developed in Canada for young people (ages 13 to 24) who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The program is designed to provide immediate access to safe, affordable, and appropriate housing. This guide describes the program’s five core principles: a right to housing without preconditions; youth choice, youth voice, and self-determination; positive youth development and wellness orientation; individualized, client-driven supports with no time limits; and social inclusion and community integration. It also includes sections about service delivery and data management, as well as three program case studies. The guide defines the HF4Y program and philosophy and delineates it from the original Housing First movement that focuses on the adult homeless population. The author outlines the types of housing, called models of accommodation, which are consistent with the HF4Y program framework. In addition, the guide includes the range of supports beyond housing for youth who participate in an HF4Y program. These supports are in the following areas: health, well-being, life skills, employment, education, and socialization.

Accession number
25451
Authors
Gaetz, S.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-AWH-HF4Y.pdf

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads

The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents results from a statistical analysis examining the relationship between indicators of substance use prevalence and child welfare caseloads. The analysis used data on child welfare caseload rates and indicators of substance use prevalence from 2011 through 2016 for most U.S. counties. The study found that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a positive relationship with child welfare caseload rates, after accounting for county socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. These substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Increases in rates of overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations are associated wwith a higher proportion of children entering foster care after reports of child maltreatment. Opioid-related hospitalization rates have a relationship with caseload rates comparable to that of other substance types, though alcohol has a stronger relationship than any illicit or prescription substance. Although there is a positive association between the substance use measures and child welfare caseload rates, this association cannot be positively identified as causal. Substance use, including opioid misuse, has downstream effects on childrens welfare and family stability, and these in turn can place a substantial burden on communities. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25426
Authors
Ghertner, R., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Radel, L., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/relationship-between-substance-use-indi….

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings From a Mixed Methods Study

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and the Child Welfare System: Key Findings From a Mixed Methods Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief presents key findings from a mixed methods study examining how substance use affects child welfare systems across the country. The study combined statistical modeling and qualitative data collection which documented the perspectives and experiences of child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, judges and other legal professionals, law enforcement officials, and other service providers. Results indicate that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a statistical relationship with child welfare caseloads (i.e., rates of child protective services reports, substantiated reports, and foster care placements). Generally, counties with higher overdose death and drug hospitalization rates have higher caseload rates. In addition, these substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Several major challenges affect how child welfare agencies and families interact with substance use treatment options, including medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Family-friendly treatment options are limited, and caseworkers, courts, and other providers often misunderstand how treatment works and lack guidelines on how to incorporate it into child welfare practice. Child welfare agencies and their community partners are struggling to meet families needs. Haphazard substance use assessment practices, barriers to collaboration with substance use treatment providers and other stakeholders, and shortages of foster homes and trained staff undermine the effectiveness of agencies responses to families. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25425
Authors
Radel, L., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Ghertner, R., Waters, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/substance-use-opioid-epidemic-and-child…

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and Child Welfare Caseloads: Methodological Details From a Mixed Methods Study

Substance Use, the Opioid Epidemic, and Child Welfare Caseloads: Methodological Details From a Mixed Methods Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents key findings from a mixed methods study examining how substance use affects child welfare systems across the country. The study combined statistical modeling and qualitative data collection which documented the perspectives and experiences of child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, judges and other legal professionals, law enforcement officials, and other service providers. Results indicate that nationally, rates of drug overdose deaths and drug-related hospitalizations have a statistical relationship with child welfare caseloads (i.e., rates of child protective services reports, substantiated reports, and foster care placements). Generally, counties with higher overdose death and drug hospitalization rates have higher caseload rates. In addition, these substance use indicators correlate with rates of more complex and severe child welfare cases. Several major challenges affect how child welfare agencies and families interact with substance use treatment options, including medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Family-friendly treatment options are limited, and caseworkers, courts, and other providers often misunderstand how treatment works and lack guidelines on how to incorporate it into child welfare practice. Child welfare agencies and their community partners are struggling to meet families needs. Haphazard substance use assessment practices, barriers to collaboration with substance use treatment providers and other stakeholders, and shortages of foster homes and trained staff undermine the effectiveness of agencies responses to families. The report includes discussion guides for child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, and other administrators and practitioners. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25560
Authors
Waters, A., Baldwin, M., Crouse, G., Ghertner, R., Radel, L.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Series
ASPE Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assitant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/259241/MethodologicalDetailsMixed…

Strategies to Address the Intersection of the Opioid Crisis and Homelessness

Strategies to Address the Intersection of the Opioid Crisis and Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief identifies five strategies that communities, providers, and policy makers can use to address the intersection of homelessness and the opioid crisis and highlights resources developed by federal and national partners to support such efforts. It includes information about the first-ever report released by the Office of the Surgeon General on this issue called Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. The brief also includes links to webinars from the National Health Care for the Homeless Council on this topic and a toolkit for law enforcement on naxolone developed by the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance. 

Accession number
25561
Type new
Brief
Organization

United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

Year published new
2017

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015

Results of the Support Systems for Rural Homeless Youth (SSRHY) Demonstration Projects 2008-2015
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FSYB) presents the results from a collaborative initiative with the Children’s Bureau called the Support Systems (SSRHY) for Rural Homeless Youth: A Collaborative State and Local Demonstration. This initiative focused on improving the circumstances of rural youth by strengthening their connection to support services, community, education, and employment. The SSRHY Demonstration funded six projects in rural areas of Colorado, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Each project worked with transition age youth who had few or no connections to supportive family structures or community support systems. The report outlines the key findings from each project related to collaboration, services, and youth outcomes.

Accession number
25669
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Family and Youth Services Bureau

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available free of charge on the FYSB website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/fysb/resource/results-of-ssrhy-demonstration-pr…

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations

Parenting and Homeless: Profiles of Young Adult Mothers and Fathers in Unstable Housing Situations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the service needs of young adults who are experiencing homelessness while they are also pregnant or parenting. The researchers used data from a survey of homeless and unstably housed young adults, ages 18 to 24, collected over four weeks to examine the characteristics, risk factors, and protective factors of homeless parents (n=109) compared with other homeless young adults (n=243). They further compared differences between mothers (n=61) and fathers (n=48). The study identifies unique risk factors and protective profiles for homeless parents and discusses the implications for service delivery needs of this subpopulation of homeless youth.

Accession number
25685
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Jennings, S.W., Maria, D.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Families in Society

Volume new
97
Year published new
2016

Mental Health and Addiction Interventions for Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Practical Strategies for Front-line Providers

Mental Health and Addiction Interventions for Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Practical Strategies for Front-line Providers
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This book is a collection of peer-reviewed research for service providers on best and promising mental health practices for street-involved youth. It contains four sections covering a range of topics that service providers inquire about most often. Part 1: Approaches and Interventions describes specific approaches for addressing mental health and substance use challenges of youth experiencing homelessness. Part 2: Specific Groups reflects the diversity among youth experiencing homelessness. While many interventions and approaches may be relevant across groups, attention should be paid to the unique needs to LGBTQ, Native, newcomer, and other youth populations. Part 3: Contexts and Considerations focuses on where and how interventions are delivered, including drop-in centers and outreach. Part 4: Assessment and Evaluation aims to support service providers who are increasingly required to provide outcome evidence in order to obtain funding and inform service improvement and resource allocation. 

Accession number
25427
Authors
Kidd, S., Slesnick, N., Frederick, T., Karabanow, J., Gaetz, S.
Type new
Book
Organization

Toronto, Canada: Canadian Observatory on Homelessness Press

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the Homeless Hub, a service of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-MentalHealthBook_0.pdf

Harnessing the Learning Community Model to Integrate Trauma-Informed Care Principles in Service Organizations

Harnessing the Learning Community Model to Integrate Trauma-Informed Care Principles in Service Organizations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents findings from the Learning Community Model for Implementation, a project of the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at New York University Silver School of Social Work, in partnership with the National Council for Behavioral Health, to develop a promising methodology to help service organizations adopt and sustain the practices and principles of Trauma-Informed Care (TIC). The Learning Community enrolled 32 behavioral health organizations to determine their readiness to meet the seven TIC domains (listed in this report). By the end of the yearlong project, 92 percent of the participating organizations had implemented TIC in at least six of the seven domains. The authors define the TIC approach as well as the prevalence and effects of trauma, including Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). 

Accession number
25528
Authors
Morrison, L., Alcantara, A., Conover, K., Salerno, A., Cleek, A., Parker, G., McKay, M., Sharp, C., Ligenza, L.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research, New York University Silver School of Social Work; National Council for Behavioral Health

Year published new
2016
Availability

Full report available for free download on the McSilver Institutes website at: http://mcsilver.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/reports/TIC-Implementation-…