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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

School-Based Programs/Services/Interventions

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide

This Is Housing First for Youth: A Program Model Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about the Housing First for Youth (HF4Y) program model. HF4Y is a rights-based intervention developed in Canada for young people (ages 13 to 24) who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The program is designed to provide immediate access to safe, affordable, and appropriate housing. This guide describes the program’s five core principles: a right to housing without preconditions; youth choice, youth voice, and self-determination; positive youth development and wellness orientation; individualized, client-driven supports with no time limits; and social inclusion and community integration. It also includes sections about service delivery and data management, as well as three program case studies. The guide defines the HF4Y program and philosophy and delineates it from the original Housing First movement that focuses on the adult homeless population. The author outlines the types of housing, called models of accommodation, which are consistent with the HF4Y program framework. In addition, the guide includes the range of supports beyond housing for youth who participate in an HF4Y program. These supports are in the following areas: health, well-being, life skills, employment, education, and socialization.

Accession number
25451
Authors
Gaetz, S.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Canadian Observatory on Homelessness

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/COH-AWH-HF4Y.pdf

Supporting In-School and Out-of-School Youth Experiencing Homelessness Through Education and Workforce Partnerships

Supporting In-School and Out-of-School Youth Experiencing Homelessness Through Education and Workforce Partnerships
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education provides an overview of education and workforce programs that serve students who are experiencing homelessness. It provides information about the education and workforce partners who work with this population and recommends how these partners can improve coordination and provide more comprehensive support for youth.

Accession number
25673
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the NCHE website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/labor-ed-collab.pdf

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents key findings from a study that shows homeless students are at significantly higher risk for suicide than the general high school student population. This study uses data from eight states and New York City, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collects through the self-reported Youth Risk Behavior Survey. ICPH recommends increasing the availability of mental health care services within schools, training teachers and school staff about trauma-informed care, and targeting services for homeless LGBTQ students.

Accession number
25731
Type new
Brief
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/suicide-and-depression-among-homeless-h…

Student Homelessness in Rural America

Student Homelessness in Rural America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents national and state-level trends showing the highest rate of growth for student homelessness is occurring in rural communities. The U.S. Census Bureau defines rural communities as those located geographically outside of urbanized areas with fewer than 2,500 residents. ICPH found that over four school years from 2013 to 2017, the number of homeless students in rural areas increased by 11% compared with 3% nationwide. This report discusses the challenges of identifying and supporting these students and their families, federal funding levels to rural school districts, and the obstacles these students face specific to their rural environment. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25716
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Series
Community
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/ruralreport/#thirty-eight-states-experi…

Risk and Resilience: Differences in Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Between Homeless and Non-Homeless Students in 2017 YRBS Data

Risk and Resilience: Differences in Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Between Homeless and Non-Homeless Students in 2017 YRBS Data
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from SchoolHouse Connection presents a study that used 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data from 17 states. Starting in 2017, YRBS included two questions related to homelessness for the first time since its inception in 1990 by the CDC. The researchers compared seven self-reported risk factors and health outcomes of high school students experiencing homelessness with their housed peers. The findings indicate youth experiencing homelessness have poorer health outcomes and exhibit higher risk behaviors. For instance, homeless youth are more likely to experience dating violence, misuse prescription pain medication, and attempt suicide. This report also includes qualitative data from interviews with 49 young people who participated in the SchoolHouse Connection’s Youth Leadership and Scholarship Program and the National Network for Youth’s National Youth Advisory Council. The researchers outline policies and practices to help school systems improve their implementation of the protections and supports provided to homeless children and youth by federal law.

Accession number
25656
Authors
Brown, K., Duffield, B., Owens, C.R.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/risk-and-resilience-differences-i…

Quick Guide for Counseling Staff Working With Students Experiencing Homelessness

Quick Guide for Counseling Staff Working With Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information on how school counseling personnel can support students who are experiencing homelessness. It includes a list of questions to assess their immediate needs related to safety, food, health, family dynamics, transportation, employment, and school. In addition, the guide provides school counselors with action steps they can take based on the outcome of the initial assessment. A checklist for graduation planning is also included. The author discusses issues such as trauma and other barriers that school counselors should consider when working with this student population.

Accession number
25448
Authors
Hurt, Dee
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Schoolhouse Connections

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Schoohouse Connections website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Quick-…

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool

Promising Practices for Building Protective and Promotive Factors to Support Positive Youth Development in Afterschool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This white paper is a collaboration of the Claremont Evaluation Center, Child Trends, and L.A.’s Best (a large afterschool program in Los Angeles) that sought to address the knowledge gap related to how afterschool practices can support positive youth development (PYD). The authors conducted a research review to show how afterschool programs can build protective and promotive factors associated with supporting PYD. The paper examines which outcomes are important to develop during childhood and adolescence, which protective and promotive factors support positive youth outcomes, and which evidence-informed practices show promise for afterschool programs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25744
Authors
Berry, T., Teachanarong-Aragon, L., Sloper, M., Bartlett, J.D., Steber, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Claremont Evaluation Center and Child Trends

Series
LAs Best: Protective Factors Afterschool Project
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Claremont Graduate School website at: http://www.cgu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Berry_LAsBest_WhitePaper…

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) provides an overview of the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) and Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) programs and reviews the McKinney-Vento and Runway and Homeless Youth Act requirements related to cross-systems collaboration. NCHE suggests strategies to promote cross-system collaboration to support the education of runaway and homeless youth. The brief includes two partnership profiles and additional resources.

Accession number
25721
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the NCHE website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/rhy-lea-collab.pdf

Part V: Missing School Due to Safety Concerns

Part V: Missing School Due to Safety Concerns
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief from SchoolHouse Connection looks at demographic and risk factor data of high school students experiencing homelessness compared with students not experiencing homelessness. It uses the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results from 17 states during the 2016-2017 school year. According to these data, more than 28% of students experiencing homelessness miss school due to safety concerns, which is nearly five times higher compared with their stably housed peers. These safety concerns include navigating through dangerous neighborhoods, often before sunrise and after dark, and being bullied by their classmates. This brief provides action steps schools can take to help these students feel safe and increase their attendance.

Accession number
25806
Type new
Brief
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Series
Student Homelessness: Lessons from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/YRBS-m…

Next Steps for the Seattle Housing Authority-Seattle Public Schools Partnership: Assessing Progress for a Strong and Innovative Partnership

Next Steps for the Seattle Housing Authority-Seattle Public Schools Partnership: Assessing Progress for a Strong and Innovative Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Urban Institute outlines recommendations for the Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) and Seattle Public Schools (SPS) as they expand their collaborative efforts to focus on a comprehensive, systems-level partnership. Partnerships between housing and schools is a developing field. The ongoing SHA-SPS collaboration has built a solid foundation for a productive, sustainable partnership through thoughtful planning and capacity building. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25866
Authors
Galvez, M., Gallagher, M., Brennan, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/next-steps-seattle-housing-a…