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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Runaway Youth

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children

Runaway Youth: Caring for the Nation’s Largest Segment of Missing Children
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article discusses the role pediatricians and other health care professionals have in supporting runaway youth, addressing their unique health needs, fostering positive relationships within their families and with other supportive adults, and connecting them with available community resources. This report provides clinical guidance for pediatricians and other health care professionals regarding (1) the identification of adolescents who are at risk for running away or being thrown away and (2) the management of the unique medical, mental health, and social needs of these youth. The authors contend that pediatricians can significantly reduce risk and improve long-term outcomes for runaway youth in partnership with national, state, and local resources. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25880
Authors
Gambon, T.B., Gerwirtz, J.R.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

American Academy of Pediatrics

Journal Name

Pediatrics

Volume new
145
Year published new
2020
Availability

Mental Health Outcomes Among Homeless, Runaway, and Stably Housed Youth

Mental Health Outcomes Among Homeless, Runaway, and Stably Housed Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to assess differences in mental health outcomes among runaway youth and homeless youth. Both populations are at risk for adverse mental health outcome and are frequently pooled together in both research and interventions yet may have unique health needs. The researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 9- and 11th-graders in the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey (n=68,785). They categorized youth into four subgroups based on housing status in the previous year: (1) unaccompanied homeless youth (0.5%), (2) runaway youth (4%), (3) youth who had both run away and been homeless (0.6%), and (4) stably housed youth (95%). They found that unstably housed youth had poorer mental health outcomes when compared with their stably housed peers. For example, 11% of homeless youth, 20% of runaways, and 33% of youth who had experienced both had attempted suicide in the previous year compared with 2% of stably housed youth. The findings suggest that runaway and homeless youth represent unique populations with high levels of mental health needs who would benefit from targeted clinical and community interventions. Pediatric clinicians represent one potential point of screening and intervention. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25881
Authors
Gerwirtz, J.R., Edinburgh, L.D., Barnes, A.J., McRee, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

American Academy of Pediatrics

Journal Name

Pediatrics

Volume new
145
Year published new
2020
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/145/4/e201926…

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides the official definition of youth homelessness as developed by the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness. It discusses why a definition of youth homelessness should be distinguished from adult homelessness. For young people, homelessness not only involves the lack of stable housing but also the absence of a home where they are embedded in relations of dependence. The report provides a typology of homelessness and housing insecurity: unsheltered, emergency sheltered, provisionally accommodated, and at risk of homelessness. An appendix is provided for the full typology. The report outlines the key differences within the youth homelessness population in terms of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. It discusses the different pathways to youth homelessness: individual and relational factors, structural factors, and systems failures. The report discusses the short- and long-term effects homelessness may have on youth related to physical and mental health, exploitation and victimization, criminality and street lifestyles, and lack of education from school dropout. The report also lists challenges faced by young people due to the lack of adequate services and resources. Canada has signed four core United Nations human rights agreements related to homeless youth. 

Accession number
25444
Authors
Canadian Observatory on Homelessness
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Definition_of_Youth_Homelessn…

A Trauma-Informed Model for Empowerment Programs Targeting Vulnerable Youth

A Trauma-Informed Model for Empowerment Programs Targeting Vulnerable Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article investigates the relationship between trauma and empowerment programs aimed at youth. It reviews how trauma can affect participants in youth-led programs; the characteristics of effective, trauma-informed, youth empowerment programs; and ways an empowerment program can increase the resiliency and psychological well-being of trauma-exposed youth. Involving youth in program planning, organizing, and implementation can encourage them to participate in their communities and increase their sense of agency. The authors describe what they view as the core components of a youth empowerment program and propose a model for creating trauma-informed programs. Effective trauma-informed youth empowerment programs involve the interaction among staff, youth, program context, activities, and evaluation. Program staff should understand the prevalence, effects, and signs of trauma and be skilled in working with youth who have experienced trauma. Youth voices and autonomy should be recognized and encouraged and activities should be designed to increase participants’ self-esteem and self-efficacy. Both process and outcome evaluations are valuable for ensuring youth satisfaction with the program and identifying program effects on youth participants.

Accession number
25383
Authors
Bulanda, J., Johnson, T.B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Series
Volume 33 Issue 4
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full text available by subscription or purchase. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-015-0427-z

2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report

2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides key information on the thousands of youth in crisis who contacted the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) in 2016. In addition to the data collected by NRS during interactions with people who contact the Safeline, the report also comments on and analyzes the data to identify trends and illuminate reasons youth contacted NRS. NRS responded to 29,806 inquiries from youth and adults seeking help and information. Almost 75 percent of contacts were youth, 9 percent identified themselves as parents, and 6 percent said they contacted NRS about a friend. Twenty-eight percent of crisis contacts were about youth on the street, down from 56 percent of contacts in 2011, reflecting a trend of more youth seeking help before they are in a dangerous situation. Of contacts regarding youth on the street, 5,446 were depending on friends and relatives, 715 on shelters and soup kitchens, and 562 on employment. Panhandling and engaging in survival sex were also listed as means of survival on the street, with 180 and 106 reports, respectively. Crisis contacts reported many issues, including family dynamics (22,592 reports), emotional and/or verbal abuse (6,221 reports), and physical abuse or assault (4,395 reports). The Safeline provided numerous services and referrals in 2016, such as facilitating conference calls between youth and youth-serving organizations (2,436), relaying messages between parents or guardians and children (71), arranging conference calls between parents or guardians and children (519), and issuing 393 bus tickets through Greyhound’s Home Free program. Most contacts learn about NRS via the Internet (67 percent) or word of mouth (11 percent).

Accession number
25382
Authors
National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth, National Runaway Safeline, Family and Youth Services Bureau
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2017