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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Relationship Building

Relationships Come First: How Four Career Development and Workforce Readiness Programs Prepare Young People for Work and Life

Relationships Come First: How Four Career Development and Workforce Readiness Programs Prepare Young People for Work and Life
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents a study by the Center for Promise that examines how relationships help keep young people in school and on the path to adult success. In this study, the research team explores how relationships nurture employment and economic success for the young people at four career development and workforce readiness programs across the country. The four programs--located in Dallas, the Bronx, Washington, DC, and the San Francisco Bay Area--are part of a group of Youth Opportunity Fund community partners supported by the Citi Foundation’s Pathways to Progress initiative, a three-year, $50 million investment to give 100,000 low-income youth in the US the opportunity to develop the workplace skills and leadership experience needed to compete in today’s economy. Research findings include the following: 1) Relationships, including supportive relationships with program leaders, potential employers, volunteers, and program participants, come first; 2) Webs of support are integral to the program design; 3) Relationships endure and extend beyond the program; and 4) Relationship-building approaches differ depending on who the program serves.  

Accession number
25643
Authors
Jones, E.P., Flanagan, S., Zaff, J.F., McClay, C., Hynes, M., Cole, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Americas Promise Alliance

Series
Center for Promise
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on Americas Promise Alliance website at: http://www.americaspromise.org/sites/default/files/d8/CitiYOFReport1_fi…

Promoting Permanency for Older Youth in Out-of-Home Care

Promoting Permanency for Older Youth in Out-of-Home Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Children’s Bureau provides information for child welfare professionals about the importance of permanency planning for youth. This planning should include both legal permanency, such as decisions about reunification versus adoption, and relational permanency, such as identifying caring adults in the youth’s life. These adults may provide long-term support that can help youth transition to adulthood and may become a legal permanent option. The brief covers current federal legislation that supports youth permanency as well as strategies for permanency planning with youth. These include involving youth in permanency planning, strengthening reunification services, and helping youth maintain or establish relationships with kin.

Accession number
25844
Type new
Brief
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free on the Child Welfare Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/bulletins_permanency.pdf

Engaging Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Core Practices and Services

Engaging Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Core Practices and Services
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes practices and services that health care organizations serving people who are homeless have developed to involve homeless youth with systems of care. It provides strategies used by practitioners in the field on how to establish relationships with youth, design services and arrange physical environments, and measure engagement at the individual and agency levels. The authors derived the information outlined in the report from the Engaging Homeless Youth Advisory Work Group, the 2014 National Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Conference and Policy Symposium, a field survey, interviews with six HCH grantees, and a literature review.

Accession number
25599
Authors
Hishida, J.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

National Health Care for the Homeless Council

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Health Care for the Homeless Council website at: https://www.nhchc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/engaging-youth-experie…

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24

Ending Homelessness for Unaccompanied Youth Age 18-24
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Alliance to End Homelessness and its partners assembled a group of expert practitioners, known as the Practice Knowledge Project, to discuss the most effective interventions to prevent youth homelessness from their experience in the field. This brief provides lessons learned about serving older homeless youth. The project recommends the following: 1) help youth develop and navigate supportive relationships with family, peers, and other caring adults; 2) offer multiple housing options with developmentally appropriate services; 3) guide youth as they connect to mainstream services; and 4) adequately train and support frontline staff.

Accession number
25460
Authors
National Alliance to End Homelessness
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the National Alliance to End Homelessness website at: http://endhomelessness.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/ending-homelessne…

Barriers to Success: Moving Toward a Deeper Understanding of Adversitys Effects on Adolescents

Barriers to Success: Moving Toward a Deeper Understanding of Adversitys Effects on Adolescents
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center for Promise presents findings from four studies on adversity among youth and their primary caregivers. This report refers to Adverse Life Experience (ALE) to describe the multitude of severe challenges youth may face throughout their adolescence, which goes beyond the definition of Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE). Collectively, the studies found a high rate of ALEs among young people with disparities in exposure by income, maternal education, and race and ethnicity. Furthermore, the studies indicate that relationships could mitigate the effects of ALEs for youth and their caregivers. The authors offer recommendations for practitioners and policymakers to help lessen the negative outcomes of multiple adversities on the lives of America’s youth.

Accession number
25650
Authors
Porche, M.V., Zaff, J.F., Pan, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Americas Promise Alliance

Series
Center for Promise
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on Americas Promise Alliance website at: http://www.americaspromise.org/report/barriers-success