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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Qualitative Research

Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound

Wraparound for Older Youth and Young Adults: Providers Views on Whether and How to Adapt Wraparound
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This collaborative report from the National Wraparound Initiative and the Pathways Research and Training Center at Portland State looks at how providers modify the Wraparound approach when working with older youth and young adults. The authors conducted a qualitative analysis by conducting interviews with facilitators, peer support providers, and program managers in eight states. This report presents a summary of these interviews and offers suggestions for training and technical assistance for Wraparound programs working with older youth and adults based on these findings. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25777
Authors
Walker, J.S., Baird, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Wraparound Initiative and Research and Training Center on Pathways to Positive Futures

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Childrens Mental Health Network website at: https://www.cmhnetwork.org/resources/10298/

Our Seat at the Table: Mentorship, Advocacy, & Youth Leadership in Qualitative Research

Our Seat at the Table: Mentorship, Advocacy, & Youth Leadership in Qualitative Research
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article discusses strategies and models for engaging diverse community partnerships through the Youth of Color Needs Assessment, a community-based participatory research project that elevates the voices and experiences of homeless and unstably housed youth of color in King County, Washington. Building upon the lens and expertise of a young Community Advocate thrust into research, it explores the strengths of youth of color leadership and best practices for trauma-informed, relational support for youth leaders and focus group participants alike. The author offers insights of a youth-centered model for the field grounded in engagement, sustainability, and ethics for research within and for communities at the margins. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25875
Authors
Pk, S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Family Violence

Volume new
33
Year published new
2018
Availability

Download with article purchase or journal subscription at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10896-018-9983-2

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed

Nothing Is for Free...: Youth Attitudes About Engaging Resources While Unstably Housed
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a national study of 215 youth, ages 13 to 25, experiencing housing instability in five US counties. The researchers used life-course interviews, a housing timeline tool, and background survey data to explore the participants use and rejection of both formal and informal resources. From their analysis, the researchers created a model of “youth logics of engagement” that shaped how youth interpreted the costs versus benefits of using available resources. The model includes the interrelated factors of identity protection, accumulated experience, and personal agency. The researchers contend youth may unintentionally expose themselves to physical risks by avoiding resources they believe might comprise their emotional, psychological, or relational well-being.

Accession number
25664
Authors
Samuels, G.M., Cerven, C., Curry, S.R., Robinson, S.R.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire journal issue available free of charge on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

This article presents findings from a cross-sectional, qualitative, descriptive study, grounded in the positive youth development approach and the Youth Program Quality Assessment model, to examine the effectiveness of specialized settings designed to serve runaway and homeless youth (RHY). From a larger sample of 29 RHY-specific settings across New York State, youth ages 16 to 21 (n=37) from 11 settings were purposively sampled for semi-structured in-depth interviews on their transitions into homelessness, experiences in RHY-settings, and unmet needs. The findings show the population-tailored approaches of RHY-specific settings are vital to engaging and serving RHY due to this uniquely challenged population that is often distrustful of service settings and professional adults and skilled at surviving independently. Four major themes regarding the positive effects of RHY settings emerged: 1) engaging with an RHY setting was emotionally challenging and frightening for youth, and thus the experiences of safety and services tailored to RHY needs were critical; 2) instrumental support from staff was vital and most effective when received in a context of emotional support; 3) RHY were skilled at survival on the streets, but benefited from socialization into more traditional systems to foster future independent living; and 4) follow-through and aftercare were needed as youth transitioned out of services. With respect to gaps in settings, the RHY participants discussed their desire for more balance between needing structure and wanting autonomy and the lack of RHY input into program governance. This study advances the understanding of RHY, their service needs, and the ways settings meet these needs.

Accession number
25535
Authors
Gwadz, M., Freeman, R.M., Kutnick, A.H., Silverman, E., Ritchie, A.S., Cleland, C.M., Leonard, N.R., Sringagesh, A., Powlovich, J., Bolas, J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Frontiers in Public Health

Series
Children and Health
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00112/full

Common Themes in the Life Stories of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in High School: Implications for Educators

Common Themes in the Life Stories of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in High School: Implications for Educators
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study of the life stories of unaccompanied homeless youth (UHY) who continued to attend high school despite no longer being in the custody of a parent or guardian. The study used a qualitative approach to allow participants to share their life stories in their own words. The researchers recruited nine students (five males, four females) ranging in age from 17 to 20 from a community-based organization serving homeless youth to participate in individual interviews. A thematic analysis revealed nine themes that reflected chaotic, impoverished, and abusive family environments in combination with individual and extrafamilial factors that helped to promote resilience among the participants. The authors discuss implications for supporting UHY in schools. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25632
Authors
Mendez, L.M.R., Dickinson, S., Esposito, E., Connolly, J., Bonilla, L.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Contemporary School Psychology

Volume new
22
Year published new
2018
Availability

Coming From the Place of Walking with the Youth–That Feeds Everything: A Mixed Methods Case Study of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Organization

Coming From the Place of Walking with the Youth–That Feeds Everything: A Mixed Methods Case Study of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Organization
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a mixed-methods case study that sought to identify how a runaway and homeless youth (RHY) organization engages in positive youth development. The researchers found consistent responses from the qualitative and quantitative data that reflect the organization’s youth-centered approach. The key policies and practices that the organization emphasizes are building and maintaining empathetic relationships with youth, promoting youths’ autonomy, and regularly evaluating whether the organization is meeting its mission to provide services that demonstrate best practices. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25630
Authors
Leonard, N.R., Freeman, R., Ritchie, A.S., Gwadz, M.V., Tabac, L., Dickson, V.V., Cleland, C.M., Bolas, J., Hirsh, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
34
Year published new
2017
Availability