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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Public Housing

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth

The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined how communities are using the Family Unification Program (FUP) to address the housing needs of former foster youth. The researchers collected survey data from 91 public housing agencies (PHAs) with FUP grants that serve youth and from 70 of their partner public child welfare agencies (PCHAs). They also conducted site visits to four FUP-for-youth communities. The findings indicate that FUP implementation with this population varies significantly across communities. Despite these variations, 46 percent of PCWAs and 41 percent of PHAs identified the 18-month time limit on housing assistance as a major challenge to delivering FUP services. The authors suggest additional research that collects data on youth participants in three areas: 1) experiences with foster care and homelessness prior to entering the program, 2) engagement in supportive services while receiving FUP, and 3) outcomes after exiting the program. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25472
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Welfare

Volume new
95
Year published new
2017
Availability

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief describes how one county government—Cuyahoga County, Ohio—used an integrated data system (IDS) to develop an innovative pay for success program to serve homeless mothers who have children in the child welfare system. The Cuyahoga program, called Partnering for Family Success, is the first county-level program in the United States. The brief provides background about pay for success or social impact bonds, which began in the United Kingdom in 2010. These agreements allow private and philanthropic investors to provide upfront funding to governments to operate and pilot new evidence-based social programs to save money for the government. Pay for success programs are treated as an investment rather than as traditional grants. The brief outlines the challenges faced by the program developers and how IDS helped them design and evaluate the Partnering for Family Success program. The IDS quickly identified eligible families who were involved with separate county departments. Once identified, the program helped remove housing barriers and connected mothers and their children with other resources, such as housing assistance, behavioral health services, trauma support, and case management.

Accession number
25443
Authors
The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-integrateddataarekeytopayforsucc…

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ) developed this issue brief to help law enforcement better understand its role in addressing the intersections between juvenile justice and youth homelessness. It provides recommendations based on the CJJ Principles for Change and highlights local examples of successful implementation of these recommendations. CJJ contends that through proper training and by collaborating with local leaders, homeless programs, juvenile justice agencies, and other stakeholders, law enforcement can play an important role in improving outcomes for vulnerable youth and ensuring that young people do not experience homelessness as a result of justice involvement, or come into contact with the system as a result of their lack of stable and secure housing.

Accession number
25696
Type new
Brief
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Series
Implementing Change
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/Law%20Enfo…

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) looks at the long-term effectiveness of various programs to address homelessness for families with children. The Family Options Study randomly assigned 2,282 families to four housing or services interventions between September 2010 and January 2012 across 12 sites nationwide. The interventions were 1) permanent housing subsidies, 2) community-based rapid rehousing, 3) project-based transitional housing, and 4) usual care (emergency shelter and housing or services that families can access without immediate referral to a program that would provide them with a place to live). Each family participating in the study had spent at least seven days in emergency shelter and had at least one child age 15 or younger at the point of enrollment. The study found that families offered a subsidy experienced less than half as many episodes of subsequent homelessness as well as improvements in measures related to residential stability, food security, and other non-housing domains compared with families offered the other three interventions. 

Accession number
25683
Authors
Gubits, D., Shinn, M., Wood, M., Bell, S., Dastrup, S., Solari, C.D., Brown, S.R., McInnis, D., McCall, T., Kattel, U.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on HUD User website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/sites/default/files/pdf/Family-Options-S…