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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Positive Outcomes

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the sixth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. In collaboration with the University of Southern California and Youth Collaboratory, Chapin Hall published this brief about how communities use a common risk assessment and prioritization tool for youth experiencing homelessness (the TAY-VI-SPDAT: Next Step Tool). The authors found that a common risk assessment tool for youth can effectively help local systems prioritize limited housing resources. They also found positive outcomes associated with housing programs for youth. Youth of color were more likely to come into homelessness system and remained in homelessness systems for longer periods, tending to have fewer successful exits from homelessness by returning to their families. These findings highlight further opportunities for systems to focis on racial equite in addressing the homelessness challenge. The lessons from this analysis bolster the idea that communities can build collective intake and assessment (coordinated entry) systems, develop creative service delivery approaches for youth who do not immediately receive housing, and strengthen data to measure and improve long-term outcomes. The study also looked at how risk assessment scores related to services offered to young people and to their exits from homelessness. Finally, they examined how many youth receiving different types of services remained out of homelessness systems and which youth were most likely to return. This brief summarizes key findings and implications for action for communities and funders.

Accession number
25626
Authors
Morton, M.H., Rice, E., Blondin, M., Hsu, H., Kull, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Youth Collaboratory website at: https://youthcollaboratory.org/sites/default/files/attachments/2018-11/…

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide

Strong and Thriving Families: 2019 Prevention Resource Guide
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau developed this Resource Guide to support service providers in their work with parents, caregivers, and their children to prevent child abuse and neglect and promote child and family well-being. The Resource Guide primarily targets community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being. However, other professionals, including policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, healthcare providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy, may also find it useful. It includes information about trauma, human trafficking, family homelessness, and youth-related issues. The guide is also available in Spanish. 

Accession number
25694
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Childrens Bureau

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/guide_2019.pdf

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute designed this toolkit for individuals, governments, and organizations currently working on a pay for success (PFS) project or considering initiating a PFS project. This assessment tool describes the core elements of PFS projects and explains the importance of each core element. It also provides stakeholders with a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project and generates recommendations for remedying any weaknesses. Stakeholders can use this tool at any stage of project development. Completing this assessment also helps build the business case for a proposed project that scores well in each area.

Accession number
25689
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M., Walsh, K., Roman, J.K.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/p…

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the US Department of Education provides general information about Pay for Success (PFS) projects, which are projects that support evidence-based approaches by leveraging private investment to address societal problems and challenges while typically using government funds only when a project meets measurable, positive outcomes. This toolkit is an introductory guide for state and local governments and other stakeholders interested in exploring the possibility of a PFS project for education or related societal issues. It provides information to support stakeholders in determining if PFS is a viable financing strategy for them, lays out steps usually involved in conducting a feasibility study, and highlights critical questions and important safeguards to consider in using PFS. The Appendix includes tools that may be useful for PFS projects, including definitions of terms used throughout the document.

Accession number
25688
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the US Department of Education website at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/pay-for-success/pay-for-success-tool…

New Insights into the Back on Track Model’s Effects on Opportunity Youth Outcomes: Opportunity Works Final Evaluation Report

New Insights into the Back on Track Model’s Effects on Opportunity Youth Outcomes: Opportunity Works Final Evaluation Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents the results from a quasi-experimental evaluation by the Urban Institute in multiple Opportunity Works sites across the country. Opportunity Works was a three-year effort in Opportunity Youth Forum communities led by Jobs for the Future to help opportunity youth—young people ages 16 to 24 who are not in school or meaningfully employed—access post-secondary and career pathways. The study found large, consistent, positive effects on participants’ post-secondary enrollment and increased connection with either education or employment about one year after program entry. Specifically, Opportunity Works participants were twice as likely to enroll in college and 25% more likely to be in either education or employment. Post-secondary results were even greater for young men of color, who were nearly six times as likely to enroll in college. This report includes insights and lessons from qualitative field research. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25868
Authors
Anderson, T., Peters, H.E., Braga, B., Derrick-Mills, T., Dodkowski, A., Runes, C., Winkler, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

The Aspen Insititute Forum for Community Solutions

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Aspen Institutes website at: https://aspencommunitysolutions.org/report/new-insights-into-the-back-o…

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute describes the need for understanding and interpreting evidence for pay for success (PFS) projects and in broader public decision-making. The authors discuss the growing body of social science research showing the importance of strong evidence to determine which projects will work. This brief defines evidence, why it matters to PFS projects, how to assess the quality of existing evidence, and what to do when only limited evidence is available. The authors contend that using evidence to make public welfare decisions improves government effectiveness and drives better outcomes for society.

Accession number
25690
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/evaluation-toolkit/content/evidence-outcomes-usin…

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems

Applying the Science of Child Development in Child Welfare Systems
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University discusses how child welfare systems can use developmental science to better support the children, families, and communities that they serve. The Center intended this report for leaders of public child welfare agencies; private, nonprofit organizations; juvenile and family courts; and legislative committees that work on public policy related to child welfare. The first part of this report focuses on child development and how adversity, such as toxic stress, can disrupt healthy development. The second part outlines how developmental science can improve outcomes in three ways: reduce external sources of stress, develop responsive relationships, and strengthen core life skills. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25764
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Series
Science to Policy and Practice
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Centers website at: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/child-welfare-systems/