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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Participatory Action Research

Speaking Out: Youth Led Research as a Methodology Used with Homeless Youth

Speaking Out: Youth Led Research as a Methodology Used with Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined participatory action as a methodology for the homeless youth population. Participatory action research is well documented with other marginalized groups, but less so with homeless youth. The study recruited and trained 10 peer researchers who were homeless and between the ages of 18 and 25.  Several important themes emerged from the qualitative interviews conducted by the peer researchers with other homeless youth. The peer researchers reported individual benefits of feeling that participating in the project mattered, that people listened to them, and that they had a voice. In addition, the peer researchers perceived that homeless youth were more likely to talk to them in greater depth as peers compared with adults. Results indicate that youth-led research is a promising methodology for use among homeless youth. The peer researchers agreed that this approach could positively impact the quality and quantity of data that could be collected from youth participants.

Accession number
25513
Authors
Gomez, R.J., Ryan, T.N.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
33
Year published new
2016
Availability

Reflecting on Participatory, Action-Oriented Research Methods in Community Pscyhology: Progress, Problems, and Paths Forward

Reflecting on Participatory, Action-Oriented Research Methods in Community Pscyhology: Progress, Problems, and Paths Forward
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents an analysis of how participatory action research (PAR) methods pertain to community psychology. Following a brief review of the fundamental aspects of PAR, the authors examine the key developments in the field, including how PAR methods have been used to engage street-involved youth. The article provides three illustrative case studies of programs in the areas of youth homelessness, consumer/survivor engagement, and Indigenous research to demonstrate contemporary challenges and opportunities. The authors argue that without an effort to reconsider and redefine PAR, moving away from the stereotypical PAR “project” framework, these methods will continue to be poorly represented and underutilized in community psychology. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25541
Authors
Kidd, S., Davidson, L., Frederick, T., Kral, M.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
61
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ajcp.12214

Project Awareness: Fostering Social Justice Youth Development to Counter Youth Experiences of Housing Instability, Trauma and Injustice

Project Awareness: Fostering Social Justice Youth Development to Counter Youth Experiences of Housing Instability, Trauma and Injustice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) methods coupled with Social Justice Youth Development with six youth experiencing housing instability who were accessing educational, life skill, and developmental services from a drop-in center in Chicago. The participants were active members of youth-centered research workshops. The study aimed to address three questions: 1) In what ways do current youth programs and policies support and/or limit positive youth development (PYD) among unaccompanied youth experiencing housing instability? 2) How might a YPAR approach support PYD of youth experiencing housing instability? 3) How do factors of housing instability, trauma, and race shape the developmental trajectories of unaccompanied youth aged 18-24? Findings from this study reveal the need for increased funding for community-based, PYD services; consistent, yet flexible workshops for highly mobile youth; and safe spaces in which youth can explore and analyze the sociopolitical contexts shaping their experiences to inform their approaches in navigating various social systems and structures. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25526
Authors
Aviles, A.M., Grigalunas, N.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, College of Education and Human Development, University of Delaware, Newark, DE

Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
84
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917304383

King County Youth of Color Needs Assessment: The Experiences, Strengths, & Needs of Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth of Color

King County Youth of Color Needs Assessment: The Experiences, Strengths, & Needs of Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth of Color
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents the findings from a systematic examination of the overrepresentation of homelessness among youth of color in King County, WA. This project used a participatory, community-based approach that incorporated the feedback and guidance of community partners and youth leaders of color. The researchers conducted 12 focus groups countywide, from September to December 2016, that sought to understand the experiences of and the contexts surrounding homelessness among this population. In total, 103 young people, ages 13 to 24, participated in the focus groups. The researchers adapted the Five Domains of Wellbeing Framework to create a context for and connection between the key themes of the project. This report outlines the four major takeaways from the project based on the themes that emerged from the focus groups, along with policy and practice recommendations. The takeaways are: 1) Structural racism undergirds the experiences of homelessness for young people of color; 2) The complex role of families should be recognized; 3) Building relationships with homeless young people of color is essential for supporting them; and 4) Young people of color want flexible, strengths-based supports that affirm their self-determination and meet their basic needs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25521
Authors
Lippy, C., Pk, S., Hsieh, E., Perez-Darby, S., Burk, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

The Northwest Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian & Gay Survivors of Abuse

Year published new
2017
Availability

Full report available for free download on the NW Network website at: https://www.nwnetwork.org/youth-of-color-needs-assessment/

Awareness, Analysis, Engagement: Critical Consciousness Through Foster Youth Advisory Board Participation

Awareness, Analysis, Engagement: Critical Consciousness Through Foster Youth Advisory Board Participation
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a study that uses a strengths-based, critical consciousness framework to describe how 15 foster youth advisory board members in a single state reflect on, analyze, and respond to their socio-political worlds. Foster youth advisory boards provide child welfare-involved young people a forum through which to impact the policies, programs, and services that govern their care. In addition to facilitating policy change, these boards may also enable participating youth to cultivate a deeper understanding of themselves and their worlds. To this end, the author aims to describe youth advisory board processes, while also analyzing how critical consciousness develops through foster youth advisory board participation. The author discusses emergent themes around the existing dimensions of critical consciousness. The article includes implications for policy, practice, and future research. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25878
Authors
Forenza, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
35
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available through journal subscription or article purchase at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-017-0515-3