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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Outcomes Measurement

The West Coast Convening Framework: A Practical Guide to Outcomes Measurement for Programs Serving Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness

The West Coast Convening Framework: A Practical Guide to Outcomes Measurement for Programs Serving Youth and Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the West Coast Convening (WCC) sought to build on existing research-informed frameworks of outcomes measurements for programs serving youth and young adults experiencing homelessness. The WCC Outcomes Workgroup focused on creating a framework that providers and stakeholders can use to facilitate results-driven care, data sharing, and cross-agency analysis. This report is intended as a practical guide about outcomes measurement for providers who are working in the field. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25772
Authors
Wilderson, D., Mousseau, H., Van Buren, E., Jaramillo, A. J.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

West Coast Convening Workgroup

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the WCC website at: http://www.westcoastconvening.com/wcc-outcomes

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute designed this toolkit for individuals, governments, and organizations currently working on a pay for success (PFS) project or considering initiating a PFS project. This assessment tool describes the core elements of PFS projects and explains the importance of each core element. It also provides stakeholders with a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project and generates recommendations for remedying any weaknesses. Stakeholders can use this tool at any stage of project development. Completing this assessment also helps build the business case for a proposed project that scores well in each area.

Accession number
25689
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M., Walsh, K., Roman, J.K.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/p…

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the US Department of Education provides general information about Pay for Success (PFS) projects, which are projects that support evidence-based approaches by leveraging private investment to address societal problems and challenges while typically using government funds only when a project meets measurable, positive outcomes. This toolkit is an introductory guide for state and local governments and other stakeholders interested in exploring the possibility of a PFS project for education or related societal issues. It provides information to support stakeholders in determining if PFS is a viable financing strategy for them, lays out steps usually involved in conducting a feasibility study, and highlights critical questions and important safeguards to consider in using PFS. The Appendix includes tools that may be useful for PFS projects, including definitions of terms used throughout the document.

Accession number
25688
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the US Department of Education website at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/pay-for-success/pay-for-success-tool…

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a study using data from a large sample of youth from California child welfare records to estimate the impact of extended foster care on postsecondary education outcomes. The sample includes youth who were in the child welfare system before and after the state of California extended foster care to age 21. The study looks at three outcomes: enrollment by age 21, persistence by age 21, and the number of semesters completed by age 21. The researchers found that extended foster care increases the likelihood that youth under supervised care will enroll in postsecondary education before turning 21 but does not increase the rates of persistence or the number of semesters completed among this youth population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25736
Authors
Okpych, N.J., Park, S., Courtney, M.E.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/CalYouth-College-Enrollme…

Interventions That Foster Healing Among Sexually Exploited Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Interventions That Foster Healing Among Sexually Exploited Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of interventions for sexually exploited children and adolescents in fostering healing with this population. The researchers conducted a systematic search that generated 4,358 international publications of which 21 met their inclusion criteria. Based on each intervention’s objectives and delivery method, the researchers organized the programs into five categories: 1) focused health and/or social services, 2) intensive case management models, 3) psychoeducational therapy groups, 4) residential programs, and 5) other. Their review found that most programs were gender-specific, targeting girls and young women with only one designed for boys and young men. The reviewed studies reported on a range of outcomes including psychosocial outcomes, risky behaviors, trauma responses, mental health, protective factors, and public health outcomes. Despite differences in delivery, most of the interventions did, to some degree, appear to foster healing among sexually exploited children and adolescents. The researchers maintain that the findings from this review have implications for researchers, policy and program developers, and frontline practitioners who can partner together to create evidence-informed, purpose-built, and thoughtfully delivered interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25556
Authors
Moynihan, M., Pitcher, C., Saewyc, E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

Volume new
27
Year published new
2018
Availability

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute describes the need for understanding and interpreting evidence for pay for success (PFS) projects and in broader public decision-making. The authors discuss the growing body of social science research showing the importance of strong evidence to determine which projects will work. This brief defines evidence, why it matters to PFS projects, how to assess the quality of existing evidence, and what to do when only limited evidence is available. The authors contend that using evidence to make public welfare decisions improves government effectiveness and drives better outcomes for society.

Accession number
25690
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/evaluation-toolkit/content/evidence-outcomes-usin…