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Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences

Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. For the second phase, six of the 18 organizations received funding to refine and test their comprehensive service models with a three-year implementation grant. This issue brief describes the challenges, lessons learned, and next steps of one grantee—Lighthouse Youth Services in Cincinnati, Ohio. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25490
Authors
Hicks, M., Harding, J., Mecum, B.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Lessons from the Field
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief describes how one county government—Cuyahoga County, Ohio—used an integrated data system (IDS) to develop an innovative pay for success program to serve homeless mothers who have children in the child welfare system. The Cuyahoga program, called Partnering for Family Success, is the first county-level program in the United States. The brief provides background about pay for success or social impact bonds, which began in the United Kingdom in 2010. These agreements allow private and philanthropic investors to provide upfront funding to governments to operate and pilot new evidence-based social programs to save money for the government. Pay for success programs are treated as an investment rather than as traditional grants. The brief outlines the challenges faced by the program developers and how IDS helped them design and evaluate the Partnering for Family Success program. The IDS quickly identified eligible families who were involved with separate county departments. Once identified, the program helped remove housing barriers and connected mothers and their children with other resources, such as housing assistance, behavioral health services, trauma support, and case management.

Accession number
25443
Authors
The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-integrateddataarekeytopayforsucc…

Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in Ohio, 2014-2016

Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in Ohio, 2014-2016
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study to develop the first statewide estimates of known victims and individuals at risk of human trafficking in Ohio. The authors collected data from 12 state and local sources, including child welfare, legal services, and law enforcement records, from 2013 to 2018. From this data collection, they identified 1,032 known victims and 4,209 youth at risk of being trafficking victims during the study period. As an important public health priority, the authors contend researchers can use epidemiological approaches to estimate the prevalence of human trafficking victims and potential victims.

Accession number
25847
Authors
Anderson, V.R., Kulig, T.C., Sullivan, C.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Public Health

Volume new
10
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available with journal subscription or article purchase at: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2019.305203