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Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at disruptions that often coincide with the experience of housing stability, such as mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism, can threaten the educational stability. Consequently, these school instability factors may negatively affect academic performance and ruin a student’s ability to graduate. This report focuses on mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism and how to support students experiencing homelessness so they can fully experience the same educational opportunities as their housed peers. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25726
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SH_SchoolInstability…

Student Homelessness in New York City: Disparities in Academic Achievement

Student Homelessness in New York City: Disparities in Academic Achievement
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at the disparities in academic performance between students who have experienced homelessness and their housed peers using data from state-mandated English Language Arts (ELA) and math exams. Homeless students were more likely to score at the lowest performance level on state assessments. ICPH determined that attendance and school instability are two of the strongest factors correlated with student performance. This disparity in academic performance leaves homeless students at a disadvantage to prepare adequately for future coursework and eventually graduate from high school. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25858
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness

Series
Student Homelessness in New York City
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/disparities-in-academic-achievement/

More Than a Place to Sleep: Understanding the Health and Well-Being of Homeless High School Students

More Than a Place to Sleep: Understanding the Health and Well-Being of Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness (ICPH) presents the findings from an analysis of the differences in risk behaviors and health outcomes between homeless high school students and their housed classmates in New York City public and charter schools. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided access to anonymous self-reported data for the sample of high school students who participated in the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in 2015. YRBS includes questions that distinguish between homeless and housed students. ICPH found that while only 12 percent of the YBRS sample was homeless, these students represent a third or more of all students facing a range of health risks. The report presents key findings of the disparity in physical, emotional, and mental health outcomes for homeless students compared with their housed peers and discusses policy considerations to ameliorate this disproportionate burden, such as leveraging existing programs, linking health records to school data, and keeping health outcomes part of the narrative. The report provides a glossary of terms and the YRBS survey questions.

Accession number
25557
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness

Year published new
2017
Availability

Report available for free download on the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/ICPH-MTAPTS-Report-W…

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings

Do Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Work? A Qualitative Exploration From the Perspective of Youth Clients in Diverse Settings
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

Yes

Abstract

This article presents findings from a cross-sectional, qualitative, descriptive study, grounded in the positive youth development approach and the Youth Program Quality Assessment model, to examine the effectiveness of specialized settings designed to serve runaway and homeless youth (RHY). From a larger sample of 29 RHY-specific settings across New York State, youth ages 16 to 21 (n=37) from 11 settings were purposively sampled for semi-structured in-depth interviews on their transitions into homelessness, experiences in RHY-settings, and unmet needs. The findings show the population-tailored approaches of RHY-specific settings are vital to engaging and serving RHY due to this uniquely challenged population that is often distrustful of service settings and professional adults and skilled at surviving independently. Four major themes regarding the positive effects of RHY settings emerged: 1) engaging with an RHY setting was emotionally challenging and frightening for youth, and thus the experiences of safety and services tailored to RHY needs were critical; 2) instrumental support from staff was vital and most effective when received in a context of emotional support; 3) RHY were skilled at survival on the streets, but benefited from socialization into more traditional systems to foster future independent living; and 4) follow-through and aftercare were needed as youth transitioned out of services. With respect to gaps in settings, the RHY participants discussed their desire for more balance between needing structure and wanting autonomy and the lack of RHY input into program governance. This study advances the understanding of RHY, their service needs, and the ways settings meet these needs.

Accession number
25535
Authors
Gwadz, M., Freeman, R.M., Kutnick, A.H., Silverman, E., Ritchie, A.S., Cleland, C.M., Leonard, N.R., Sringagesh, A., Powlovich, J., Bolas, J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Frontiers in Public Health

Series
Children and Health
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00112/full

A Youth Homelessness System Assessment for New York City

A Youth Homelessness System Assessment for New York City
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a rapid, mixed-methods assessment of the system of services and supports available to youth experiencing homelessness in New York City. The assessment team found that significant gaps remain in prevention, affordable housing options, and coordination of youth services despite the city’s efforts to expand some services and prioritize youth homelessness. Based on these findings, Chapin Hall has recommended that the city establish a single office for an interagency response to youth homelessness with shared processes and tools for coordinated entry and support for youth, including affordable housing and career development opportunities. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25737
Authors
Morton, M.H., Kull, M.A., Chávez, R., Chrisler, A.J., Carreon, E., Bishop, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Report_A-Youth-Homelessne…