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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Needs Assessment

Varied Progress Toward Comprehensive Service Models and Evaluations

Varied Progress Toward Comprehensive Service Models and Evaluations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. This brief is part of a series that summarizes high-level themes from a process study of YARH grantees’ activities and accomplishments during Phase I. This information was gleaned from grant applications, grantees’ semi-annual progress reports, and two-day site visits to each grantee. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25494
Authors
Fung, N., Gothro, A., Knas, E., Bradley, M.C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) In the Spotlight
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute designed this toolkit for individuals, governments, and organizations currently working on a pay for success (PFS) project or considering initiating a PFS project. This assessment tool describes the core elements of PFS projects and explains the importance of each core element. It also provides stakeholders with a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project and generates recommendations for remedying any weaknesses. Stakeholders can use this tool at any stage of project development. Completing this assessment also helps build the business case for a proposed project that scores well in each area.

Accession number
25689
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M., Walsh, K., Roman, J.K.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/p…

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the US Department of Education provides general information about Pay for Success (PFS) projects, which are projects that support evidence-based approaches by leveraging private investment to address societal problems and challenges while typically using government funds only when a project meets measurable, positive outcomes. This toolkit is an introductory guide for state and local governments and other stakeholders interested in exploring the possibility of a PFS project for education or related societal issues. It provides information to support stakeholders in determining if PFS is a viable financing strategy for them, lays out steps usually involved in conducting a feasibility study, and highlights critical questions and important safeguards to consider in using PFS. The Appendix includes tools that may be useful for PFS projects, including definitions of terms used throughout the document.

Accession number
25688
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the US Department of Education website at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/pay-for-success/pay-for-success-tool…

Our Seat at the Table: Mentorship, Advocacy, & Youth Leadership in Qualitative Research

Our Seat at the Table: Mentorship, Advocacy, & Youth Leadership in Qualitative Research
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article discusses strategies and models for engaging diverse community partnerships through the Youth of Color Needs Assessment, a community-based participatory research project that elevates the voices and experiences of homeless and unstably housed youth of color in King County, Washington. Building upon the lens and expertise of a young Community Advocate thrust into research, it explores the strengths of youth of color leadership and best practices for trauma-informed, relational support for youth leaders and focus group participants alike. The author offers insights of a youth-centered model for the field grounded in engagement, sustainability, and ethics for research within and for communities at the margins. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25875
Authors
Pk, S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Family Violence

Volume new
33
Year published new
2018
Availability

Download with article purchase or journal subscription at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10896-018-9983-2

King County Youth of Color Needs Assessment: The Experiences, Strengths, & Needs of Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth of Color

King County Youth of Color Needs Assessment: The Experiences, Strengths, & Needs of Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth of Color
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents the findings from a systematic examination of the overrepresentation of homelessness among youth of color in King County, WA. This project used a participatory, community-based approach that incorporated the feedback and guidance of community partners and youth leaders of color. The researchers conducted 12 focus groups countywide, from September to December 2016, that sought to understand the experiences of and the contexts surrounding homelessness among this population. In total, 103 young people, ages 13 to 24, participated in the focus groups. The researchers adapted the Five Domains of Wellbeing Framework to create a context for and connection between the key themes of the project. This report outlines the four major takeaways from the project based on the themes that emerged from the focus groups, along with policy and practice recommendations. The takeaways are: 1) Structural racism undergirds the experiences of homelessness for young people of color; 2) The complex role of families should be recognized; 3) Building relationships with homeless young people of color is essential for supporting them; and 4) Young people of color want flexible, strengths-based supports that affirm their self-determination and meet their basic needs. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25521
Authors
Lippy, C., Pk, S., Hsieh, E., Perez-Darby, S., Burk, C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

The Northwest Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian & Gay Survivors of Abuse

Year published new
2017
Availability

Full report available for free download on the NW Network website at: https://www.nwnetwork.org/youth-of-color-needs-assessment/

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute describes the need for understanding and interpreting evidence for pay for success (PFS) projects and in broader public decision-making. The authors discuss the growing body of social science research showing the importance of strong evidence to determine which projects will work. This brief defines evidence, why it matters to PFS projects, how to assess the quality of existing evidence, and what to do when only limited evidence is available. The authors contend that using evidence to make public welfare decisions improves government effectiveness and drives better outcomes for society.

Accession number
25690
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/evaluation-toolkit/content/evidence-outcomes-usin…

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a research project initiated by a community-academic partnership to count homeless youth and conduct a survey focused on the health needs of this population. After a four-week recruitment period, the authors counted 632 youth, of which 420 were directly surveyed for this study. They found the following methodologies were the most effective: 1) using an extended counting period, 2) applying broader inclusion criteria to capture those in unstable housing, 3) using student volunteers in health training programs, 4) recruiting from magnet events for high-risk youth, and 4) partnering with community agencies to disseminate the findings. The authors found that the following strategies did not facilitate recruitment: 1) respondent-driven sampling, 2) street canvassing beyond known hotspots, and 3) community agencies leading data collection efforts. Most youth completed the self-report survey and provided detailed information about risk behaviors. In addition, the survey results captured the different housing types, including youth staying in shelters or transitional housing (n=205), those in unstable housing (n=75), and those who were on the streets or living in uninhabitable places (n=140). The article includes recommendations on how to combine research data collection with counting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25516
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Santa Maria, D.M., Ha, Y., Cooper, J., Schieszler, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
41
Year published new
2016
Availability

Assessing Eligibility for Post-Conviction Relief for Survivors of Human Trafficking: Tips for Service Providers

Assessing Eligibility for Post-Conviction Relief for Survivors of Human Trafficking: Tips for Service Providers
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The American Bar Association (ABA) developed this tip sheet for service providers who work with survivors of human trafficking to assess their eligibility for post-conviction relief through expungement and vacatur laws. Unresolved criminal records can negatively affect survivors eligibility for services, programs, licenses, and jobs as well as their sense of empowerment and well-being. Therefore, the ABA suggests discussing with survivors the extent of their criminal legal involvement as part of their long-term support plans.

Accession number
25747
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

American Bar Association

Year published new
2018
Availability