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Low-Income Students

Using a Person-Centered Approach to Examine the Impact of Homelessness on School Absences

Using a Person-Centered Approach to Examine the Impact of Homelessness on School Absences
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used a person-centered approach to compare the number of school absences of homeless students with their housed peers. The researchers designed this study to test the theory that homeless students often miss an inordinate amount of school days and are thought to be at the end of the “continuum of poverty.” Using school administrative data collected over one school year for an entire school district, the researchers found that homeless children as an aggregate do not miss significantly more days of school than housed students receiving free lunch. However, they found that homelessness and poverty dramatically increase the number of absences for children who are in the higher percentiles of absences, meaning homelessness has a greater impact on those who miss more days of school in general compared with regular attendees. Findings from this study indicate that homelessness may exacerbate problems rather than cause them. The researchers discuss implications for practice and propose directions for future study. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25542
Authors
Canfield, J.P., Nolan, J., Harley, D., Hardy, A., Elliott, W.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
33
Year published new
2016
Availability

Hunger in Higher Education: Experiences and Correlates of Food Insecurity Among Wisconsin Undergraduates from Low-Income Families

Hunger in Higher Education: Experiences and Correlates of Food Insecurity Among Wisconsin Undergraduates from Low-Income Families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a mixed-methods study of low-income students at 42 public colleges and universities in Wisconsin to show the daily experiences of food insecurity and to examine the food security status across different student backgrounds. From survey and interview data, the results indicate that students who grew up in food-insecure homes, self-identify as a racial/ethnic minority, live off-campus, and attend college in an urban area are significantly more likely to report the lowest level of food security often associated with hunger. Students explain that the lack of time and money are their biggest barriers to food security. Most rely on friends or family for support, while few use the social safety net, in part, due to eligibility restrictions. The authors discuss the need for a multifaceted response to promote food security and student success.

Accession number
25635
Authors
Broton, K.M., Weaver, K.E., Mai, M.,
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Social Sciences

Volume new
10
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available to download free of charge: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/7/10/179/htm