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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Local Governments

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute designed this toolkit for individuals, governments, and organizations currently working on a pay for success (PFS) project or considering initiating a PFS project. This assessment tool describes the core elements of PFS projects and explains the importance of each core element. It also provides stakeholders with a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project and generates recommendations for remedying any weaknesses. Stakeholders can use this tool at any stage of project development. Completing this assessment also helps build the business case for a proposed project that scores well in each area.

Accession number
25689
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M., Walsh, K., Roman, J.K.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/p…

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the US Department of Education provides general information about Pay for Success (PFS) projects, which are projects that support evidence-based approaches by leveraging private investment to address societal problems and challenges while typically using government funds only when a project meets measurable, positive outcomes. This toolkit is an introductory guide for state and local governments and other stakeholders interested in exploring the possibility of a PFS project for education or related societal issues. It provides information to support stakeholders in determining if PFS is a viable financing strategy for them, lays out steps usually involved in conducting a feasibility study, and highlights critical questions and important safeguards to consider in using PFS. The Appendix includes tools that may be useful for PFS projects, including definitions of terms used throughout the document.

Accession number
25688
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the US Department of Education website at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/pay-for-success/pay-for-success-tool…

No Barriers: A Legal Advocates Guide to Ensuring Compliance with the Education Program of the McKinney-Vento Law

No Barriers: A Legal Advocates Guide to Ensuring Compliance with the Education Program of the McKinney-Vento Law
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This manual provides legal advocates an understanding of the relevant provisions of the McKinney-Vento Act and the tools needed to implement these legal protections for homeless children and youth. The first section summarizes the key concepts and provisions of McKinney-Vento as well as the appellate process for homeless students who receive adverse determinations from their school systems. In addition, the manual delineates the responsibilities of state educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs). The second section covers other federal and state education laws, initiatives, and resources that are relevant to helping homeless children and youth succeed in school. The third section focuses on specific populations of homeless children and youth who may face additional barriers to their education. The fourth section outlines challenges to implementing, enforcing, and complying with McKinney-Vento. The criminalization of youth homelessness is also addressed. The fifth section is a compliance list of dos and don’ts to avoid expensive and time-consuming litigation. The last section on lessons learned from previous litigation presents case summaries related to procedural and substantive issues. 

Accession number
25466
Authors
National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

The full document is available for free download on the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty website at: https://www.nlchp.org/documents/NoBarriers

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success

Integrated Data Are Key to Pay for Success
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief describes how one county government—Cuyahoga County, Ohio—used an integrated data system (IDS) to develop an innovative pay for success program to serve homeless mothers who have children in the child welfare system. The Cuyahoga program, called Partnering for Family Success, is the first county-level program in the United States. The brief provides background about pay for success or social impact bonds, which began in the United Kingdom in 2010. These agreements allow private and philanthropic investors to provide upfront funding to governments to operate and pilot new evidence-based social programs to save money for the government. Pay for success programs are treated as an investment rather than as traditional grants. The brief outlines the challenges faced by the program developers and how IDS helped them design and evaluate the Partnering for Family Success program. The IDS quickly identified eligible families who were involved with separate county departments. Once identified, the program helped remove housing barriers and connected mothers and their children with other resources, such as housing assistance, behavioral health services, trauma support, and case management.

Accession number
25443
Authors
The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Annie E. Casey Foundation website at: http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-integrateddataarekeytopayforsucc…

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects

Improving Outcomes for Transitional Youth: Considerations for Pay for Success Projects
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute summaries insights drawn from a collaboration of researchers, practitioners, and local government officials, known as a Community of Practice, which convened to discuss issues facing transitional youth. The Urban Institute defines this population as young people, ages 16 to 24, who age out of foster care without plans for reunification or adoption and who are often involved with juvenile justice. The collaboration looked at funding transitional youth programs using the pay for success (PFS) model. The brief provides recommendations developed by the Community of Practice aimed at local governments, service providers, and other partners considering PFS projects for transitional youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25837
Authors
Mitra-Majumdar, M., Fudge, K., Ramakrishnan, K.
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institutes website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/i…

Implementing Change: State and Local Governments Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice

Implementing Change: State and Local Governments Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ) developed this issue brief to help state and local governments better understand their role in addressing the intersections between juvenile justice and youth homelessness. It includes principle and practice recommendations from CJJ for government leaders to help prevent young people from experiencing homelessness or being criminalized for behaviors that stem from a lack of stable housing. CJJ includes local examples from communities that demonstrate the Principles for Change.

Accession number
25698
Type new
Brief
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Series
Implementing Change
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/State%20an…

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ) developed this issue brief to help law enforcement better understand its role in addressing the intersections between juvenile justice and youth homelessness. It provides recommendations based on the CJJ Principles for Change and highlights local examples of successful implementation of these recommendations. CJJ contends that through proper training and by collaborating with local leaders, homeless programs, juvenile justice agencies, and other stakeholders, law enforcement can play an important role in improving outcomes for vulnerable youth and ensuring that young people do not experience homelessness as a result of justice involvement, or come into contact with the system as a result of their lack of stable and secure housing.

Accession number
25696
Type new
Brief
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Series
Implementing Change
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/Law%20Enfo…

Housing Not Handcuffs: Ending the Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities

Housing Not Handcuffs: Ending the Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty (the Law Center) provides an overview of criminalization measures in effect across the country and looks at trends in the criminalization of homelessness, based on an analysis of the laws in 187 cities that the Law Center has tracked since 2006. This report analyzes local trends related to the enforcement of these laws and describes the growing federal trend to oppose and discourage local criminalization policies and practices. Next, the report discusses the ineffectiveness of laws criminally or civilly punishing life-sustaining activities among those experiencing homelessness, the cost of these laws to taxpayers, and how they often violate homeless persons’ constitutional and human rights. Finally, the Law Center recommends alternative practices for federal, state, and local governments to address the problem of visible homelessness in a sensible, humane, and legal way. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25720
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Law Centers website at: https://nlchp.org//wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Housing-Not-Handcuffs.pdf

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute describes the need for understanding and interpreting evidence for pay for success (PFS) projects and in broader public decision-making. The authors discuss the growing body of social science research showing the importance of strong evidence to determine which projects will work. This brief defines evidence, why it matters to PFS projects, how to assess the quality of existing evidence, and what to do when only limited evidence is available. The authors contend that using evidence to make public welfare decisions improves government effectiveness and drives better outcomes for society.

Accession number
25690
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/evaluation-toolkit/content/evidence-outcomes-usin…

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall describes a study to provide an estimate of the size of the homeless youth population and its characteristics in three central Florida counties (Orange, Osceola, and Seminole). Information was also gathered about the types of services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Over three days, the project surveyed youth on the street and in services, which include shelters, transitional living programs, and drop-in centers. In addition, researchers examined data from the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and school systems. Findings include: 1) On a single night in October 2017, there was a total of 268 homeless and unstably housed youth ages 13 to 24 in the three counties. 2) Twelve percent of the surveyed homeless and unstably housed youth were 13 to 17 years old. 3) Youth in the foster care and justice systems were overrepresented in the three counties. 4) Providers in the three counties have 104 shelter, transitional living, rapid rehousing, and subsidized affordable housing slots available for youth, only 10 of which serve youth under age 18. 

Accession number
25739
Authors
Chrisler, A., Horwitz, B., Morton, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/central-florida-count-identifies-se…