Skip to main content
National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Justice-Involved Youth

Youth Homelessness and the Juvenile Justice System: A Roadmap of What to Ask, Offer, and Expect from Referral to Reentry

Youth Homelessness and the Juvenile Justice System: A Roadmap of What to Ask, Offer, and Expect from Referral to Reentry
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides professionals in the fields of education, social services, and law enforcement with information to help identify and respond to youth who may be homeless. The guide recommends prosecutors, judges, and probation officers review juvenile cases for possible homelessness at each stage of the judicial process. The guide emphasizes the importance of re-entry planning with this population. The federal definition of youth homelessness is provided as well as questions professionals can ask youth to determine their housing status. 

Accession number
25459
Authors
Smoot, N.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/map_FINAL…

Youth Homeless and Juvenile Justice: Opportunities for Collaboration and Impact

Youth Homeless and Juvenile Justice: Opportunities for Collaboration and Impact
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief discusses the significant overlap between two populations—youth involved with the juvenile justice system and youth who experience homelessness. Youth who lack safe and stable housing often become involved with law enforcement and the justice system because of status offenses, public ordinance violations, or survival crimes. This brief outlines the possible long-term effects of youth homelessness and justice involvement, including physical and mental health problems and poor educational and vocational outcomes. It outlines seven areas where youth-serving organizations, including juvenile justice systems, runaway and homeless youth program, health departments, schools, community-based providers, and philanthropists, can collaborate to make an impact, including: 1) undertaking or funding research; 2) educating stakeholders; 3) investing in prevention and diversion opportunities; 4) improving re-entry planning; 5) advocating for change; 6) ensuring efforts reach youth of color and LGBTQ youth; and 7) partnering with youth and giving young people who have experienced homelessness and juvenile justice involvement leadership roles. In 2016, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice launched the Collaborating for Change: Addressing Youth Homelessness and Juvenile Justice project.  

Accession number
25439
Authors
Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download from the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/policy%20b…

Trends from the Field: Lessons Learned About Alternative Education

Trends from the Field: Lessons Learned About Alternative Education
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In this brief, the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) summarizes how the organization collaborated with key stakeholders at the national, state, local, and institutional level to develop accountability systems for alternative education programs. AYPF outlines the seven lessons learned about what these settings do well, areas that need improvement, opportunities for innovation, and issues requiring further inquiry. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25706
Authors
Kannam, J., Anand, A.
Type new
Brief
Organization

American Youth Policy Forum

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the AYPF website at: https://www.aypf.org/resource/publication_trends-from-the-field/

Supporting Pathways to Long-Term Success for Systems-Involved Youth: Lessons Learned

Supporting Pathways to Long-Term Success for Systems-Involved Youth: Lessons Learned
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) presents three key lessons the organization has identified as critical to promoting pathways to postsecondary education, training, and careers for youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster care, or both. These three lessons are leveraging authentic youth voice, providing youth with a wide range of comprehensive supports and transitional services, and strategically aligning youth-serving systems and policies. The brief includes best practice spotlights for each of the lessons learned.

Accession number
25710
Type new
Brief
Organization

American Youth Policy Forum

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the AYPF website at: https://www.aypf.org/resource/supporting-pathways-to-long-term-success/

Strategies for Reducing Criminal and Juvenile Justice Involvement

Strategies for Reducing Criminal and Juvenile Justice Involvement
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute published this brief as part of a series of policy recommendations from a project called Building Ladders of Opportunity for Young People in the Great Lakes. This brief describes how crime and justice involvement impact youth development and opportunity in general, and specifically in six Great Lakes states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The brief presents policies and practices that may help increase safety while reducing juvenile justice and criminal justice involvement and their negative effects on youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25642
Authors
Jannetta, J., Okeke, C.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Building Ladders of Opportunity for Young People in the Great Lakes States
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/strategies-reducing-criminal…

Social and Emotional Learning and Traditionally Underserved Populations

Social and Emotional Learning and Traditionally Underserved Populations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the American Youth Policy Forum focuses on social and emotional learning (SEL) programs for three traditionally underserved groups: students with disabilities, English language learners, and youth involved in the juvenile justice system.  The risk factors and consequences experienced by system-involved youth often create barriers to their social and emotional development. In addition to reviewing current research and practice related to SEL for these three student populations, the author explores possible applications of SEL programs to better prepare these students for success in school and life. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25709
Authors
Beyer, L.N.
Type new
Brief
Organization

American Youth Policy Forum

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the AYPF website at: https://www.aypf.org/resource/sel-special-populations/

Resolution Addressing the Needs of Homeless Youth and Families in Juvenile and Family Courts

Resolution Addressing the Needs of Homeless Youth and Families in Juvenile and Family Courts
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) passed a resolution during the organization’s 80th annual conference in Washington, D.C. to address the needs and issues related to homeless youth and families involved with the juvenile and family court systems. The resolution outlines strategies for judges to better serve young people experiencing homelessness and opposes the criminalization of youth for status offenses related to their lack of safe and stable housing. Juvenile and family court judges can lead the effort within their jurisdictions to improve the outcomes of youth with safe and stable housing, substance abuse and mental health services, life skills counseling, and family reunification when deemed appropriate. The resolution provides concrete steps for judges to convene child welfare and juvenile justice system stakeholders to develop a coordinated response to effectively identify and secure housing and services for homeless youth.

Accession number
25446
Authors
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Juvenile & Family Court Journal

Volume new
69
Year published new
2018
Availability

Free access to the full-text article at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jfcj.12103

Report of a Research to Practice Partnership to Develop Youth Housing Stability Model for Juvenile Courts

Report of a Research to Practice Partnership to Develop Youth Housing Stability Model for Juvenile Courts
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report provides key findings from a study of two juvenile justice systems, Snohomish and Kitsap counties, in Washington to develop a court-based strategy to prevent youth homelessness. The development team conducted this study in response to the high rate (75 percent) of homeless youth who have contact with police, with more than 50 percent experiencing arrest. They developed the Youth Housing Stability (YHS) model to minimize this contact while providing youth needed supports and services to remain housed. The development team designed the YHS model to address both system-wide and program-level needs to prevent housing instability for an estimated 100 to 150 youth within each jurisdiction each year. In addition, this model helps build community capacity for effective prevention through the implementation of services accessible to youth referred by non-court agencies. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25616
Authors
Walker, S., Valencia, E., Vick, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center for the Study and Advancement of Justice Effectiveness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the SAJE website at: https://www.sajecenter.org/publications/

Reentry Starts Here: A Guide for Youth in Long-Term Juvenile Corrections and Treatment Programs

Reentry Starts Here: A Guide for Youth in Long-Term Juvenile Corrections and Treatment Programs
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), developed this toolkit to help young people in juvenile corrections and treatment programs prepare for successful reentry into the community. The guide provides instructions for youth to follow first while they are still in placement and second once they are released. It discusses common barriers that youth may experience upon reentry and provides action steps to address those barriers with the help of a caring adult. The guide outlines how transitioning youth can seek assistance from a parent or guardian, mentor, friend, teacher, and other key people. Topics include building a reentry team; connecting to support services; planning for school and work; and following probation, parole, and court requirements.

Accession number
25678
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the OJJDP website at: https://www.ojjdp.gov/pubs/251193.pdf

Preventing Homelessness for System-Involved Youth

Preventing Homelessness for System-Involved Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article expounds on three of the 20 strategies presented in the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Resolution titled Addressing the Needs of Homeless Youth and Families in Juvenile and Family Courts. The first strategy discussed is the need to improve coordination between the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, particularly related to transition and re-entry planning for youth who are involved in both systems. The second strategy discussed is the need for judges to ensure youth within their jurisdictions receive high quality legal representation and that courts and counsel are aware of the increased risk of system-involved youth becoming homeless. The third strategy discussed is for an increase in sound judicial leadership to improve outcomes for youth experiencing homelessness. The authors state that juvenile and family court judges can help change the prevailing public perception that all system-involved youth are “bad kids.” The article includes an excerpt from the personal story of Keyona Cooper, MSW, who entered the child welfare system at age 10, and later experienced homelessness when she aged out of the system.  It also includes a case study about Davidson County, Tennessee, which is a system actively working to decriminalize youth homelessness. Information is provided about the concurrent efforts of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice and the American Bar Association’s Homeless Youth Legal Network to remove legal barriers and improve outcomes for youth and young adults experiencing homelessness.

Accession number
25445
Authors
Britton, L., Pilnik, L.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Juvenile & Family Court Journal

Volume new
69
Year published new
2018
Availability