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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Intervention

An Adapted Life Skills Empowerment Program for Homeless Youth: Preliminary Findings.

An Adapted Life Skills Empowerment Program for Homeless Youth: Preliminary Findings.
Abstract

Homeless youth are a difficult to reach subgroup of homeless individuals who require a unique level of intervention given their specific vulnerabilities as young people. They experience higher levels of trauma than their housed counterparts and lack parental guidance around concrete life skills as well as emotional support. This article provides a description of the adaptation process of a pilot life skills empowerment program designed to help homeless youth integrate successfully into the community by providing life skills training, emotional support, and social justice awareness. Youth participated in twice weekly group sessions and one-to-one mentoring with community volunteers. The adapted program was piloted in 3 cycles with small groups totaling 20 youth over the course of 18 months. Mixed methods were used to evaluate youths’ experiences in the program. While the sample size was too small to detect statistical significance, scores on validated measures (Antonovsky’s Sense of Coherence measurement tool and the Post-Traumatic Check-list Civilian version) demonstrated improvements in coping and sense of coherence and decreases in trauma symptoms. Qualitative findings supported the quantitative trends, demonstrating that youth felt more confident and hopeful about their futures, were able to set goals for themselves, and begin training programs and jobs. Youth were also able to develop trusting and meaningful relationships with mentors, staff, and peers. Implications for future program development and practice, future research, and social services education are discussed.

Authors
Sisselman-Borgia, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child &Youth Services

Volume new
42
Issue
1
Year published new
2021

Improving program implementation and client engagement in interventions addressing youth homelessness: A meta-synthesis.

Improving program implementation and client engagement in interventions addressing youth homelessness: A meta-synthesis.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In this meta-synthesis of current findings on youth interventions, the authors explore common programmatic or contextual factors that researchers and/or practitioners identify as contributing to the successful implementation of an intervention for homeless and unstably housed youth; and (2) that youth and practitioners identify as hindering successful implementation of an intervention for these youth? Two primary themes regarding factors that support successful implementation and engagement were identified: (1) Organizational and system-wide policies can shape the quality and duration of interventions, and (2) Staff behaviors and training are paramount to the success of many interventions. Results further highlight organizational and system-wide policies and staffing behaviors and training needs. The authors conclude that their review supports services that emphasize empowerment and anti-paternalism, and increased attention to racial and LGBTQ equity in future exploration of implementation and engagement within programs designed for youth experiencing homelessness. (author abstract modified)

Authors
Curry, S.R., Baiocchi, A., Tully, B.A., Garst, N., Bielz, S., Kugley,S., & Morton, M.H.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
120
Year published new
2021

Utilizing Coaching to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth with Foster Care Histories

Utilizing Coaching to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth with Foster Care Histories
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief provides an overview of how child welfare providers can use a coach-like engagement approach to work with at-risk youth. During Phase I, a Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grantee in Colorado developed an intervention model to prevent and address homelessness among transition-age youth. The authors describe the Pathways to Success model as an intensive, youth-driven, case management approach designed for youth ages 14 to 21 who are currently in foster care, preparing to age out, or have already aged out and become homeless. Furthermore, the model uses a coaching method adapted from the Co-Active Life Coaching model originally designed for adult and college student populations. Now in Phase II, the grantee has implemented the program in three collaborative test sites that represent urban, suburban, and rural communities across Colorado. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25802
Authors
Prendergast, T., Davis, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Policy Research

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Center for Policy Research website at: https://centerforpolicyresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/RB2_Coaching_Fin…

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a literature review that evaluated the effectiveness of psychological interventions for runaway and homeless youth in terms of mental health outcomes. The author identified five types of psychological interventions in 11 studies: art therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based interventions, family therapy, motivational interviewing, and strengths-based interventions. The findings show that family therapies are likely helpful for cases involving substance abuse and CBT-based interventions may work best for youth suffering from depression. However, the review did not find support for the effectiveness of any of the psychological interventions on mental health outcomes. In addition to recommending further research, the author encourages mental health nurses to assess the mental health status of runaway and homeless youth and provide timely and effective interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25740
Authors
Noh, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Series
Clinical Scholarship
Volume new
50
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with a subscription or article purchase at: https://sigmapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jnu.12402

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the eighth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents the results of a literature review conducted to determine what evidence exists on the effectiveness of programs and practices to prevent youth homelessness and improve various outcomes. The researchers selected 62 studies involving youth homelessness, which evaluated 51 programs, to develop an initial evidence base. This brief outlines the six key findings from this systematic review and the researchers recommendations to expand the evidence base for youth homelessness interventions. These include: 1. A small evidence base shows that youth homeless is preventable; 2. Rental assistance and supportive housing programs show promising results; 3. Most evaluations focus on interventions that address well-being and risk behaviors and show positive results; 4. Family-based interventions show positive results for behavioral health, but more evidence is needed; 5. There is little evidence on interventions to help youth experiencing homelessness achieve better employment outcomes; and 6. There is an alarming mismatch between investments in interventions and their evaluation. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25821
Authors
Morton, M.H., Kugley, S., Epstein, R.A., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/voices-evidence-review/

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a project to implement a screening system and treatment algorithm in an emergency department (ED) to improve the identification and rescue of human trafficking victims. After conducting a literature review on human trafficking, a multidisciplinary team completed a gap analysis between evidence-based best practices and current practices of a level 2 trauma center at a community hospital in southwestern Pennsylvania. The project ED had no standardized education or screening process for human trafficking. The project used a two-pronged identification approach that included embedding medical red flags from a risk-assessment tool into the electronic medical record and creating a silent notification process. Survey results from the ED participants indicated 75 percent reported that the education improved their competence level about human trafficking. The team assessed the success of implementation by the number of victims whom ED staff identified through either approach and how many accepted intervention.

Accession number
25585
Authors
Egyud, A., Stephens, K., Swanson-Bierman, B., DiCuccio, M., Whiteman, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Emergency Nursing

Series
Practice Improvement
Volume new
43
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.jenonline.org/article/S0099-1767(17)30041-7/pdf

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) looks at the long-term effectiveness of various programs to address homelessness for families with children. The Family Options Study randomly assigned 2,282 families to four housing or services interventions between September 2010 and January 2012 across 12 sites nationwide. The interventions were 1) permanent housing subsidies, 2) community-based rapid rehousing, 3) project-based transitional housing, and 4) usual care (emergency shelter and housing or services that families can access without immediate referral to a program that would provide them with a place to live). Each family participating in the study had spent at least seven days in emergency shelter and had at least one child age 15 or younger at the point of enrollment. The study found that families offered a subsidy experienced less than half as many episodes of subsequent homelessness as well as improvements in measures related to residential stability, food security, and other non-housing domains compared with families offered the other three interventions. 

Accession number
25683
Authors
Gubits, D., Shinn, M., Wood, M., Bell, S., Dastrup, S., Solari, C.D., Brown, S.R., McInnis, D., McCall, T., Kattel, U.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on HUD User website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/sites/default/files/pdf/Family-Options-S…

Family Interventions for Youth Experiencing or at Risk of Homelessness

Family Interventions for Youth Experiencing or at Risk of Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The authors conducted a systematic literature review of research since 2000 that focuses on family intervention strategies for youth ages 12 to 24 within the runaway and homeless youth, child welfare, juvenile justice, and education sectors. They also conducted key informant interviews with advocates, technical assistance providers, and service providers. Each of the 49 identified interventions was rated based on the rigor of its design and classified as evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, emerging, or of interest. Interventions were also grouped into three categories--prevention, reunification, or reconnection--and assessed for positive effects and statistical significance. Six interventions were classified as evidence-based (Ecologically Based Family Therapy and Functional Family Therapy) or evidence-informed (Multidimensional Family Therapy, Multisystemic Therapy, Treatment Foster Care Oregon, and Support to Reunite, Involve, and Value Each Other). Results indicate that research has uncovered a few effective family intervention strategies that provide insight into what makes these strategies successful, but more research is needed to evaluate those targeted specifically to youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. More research is also needed on how to target family interventions to key subgroups such as youth who are racial and ethnic minorities and/or LGBTQ.   

Accession number
25404
Authors
Pergamit, M., Gelatt, J., Stratford, B., Beckwith, S., Martin, M.C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute, Washington, DC

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/205401/FamilyInterventions.pdf.

Developing a Model Intervention to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth: The Pathways to Success Program

Developing a Model Intervention to Prevent Homelessness Among Transition-Age Youth: The Pathways to Success Program
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief summarizes how a Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grantee in Colorado developed an intervention model to prevent and address homelessness among transition-age youth. The authors describe the Pathways to Success model as an intensive, youth-driven case management approach designed for youth ages 14 to 21 who are currently in foster care, preparing to age out, or have already aged out and become homeless. Furthermore, the model uses a coach-like engagement method adapted from the Co-Active Life Coaching model originally designed for adult and college student populations. The authors discuss key considerations and lessons learned to guide other states and local jurisdictions as they develop transition-age youth interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25800
Authors
Davis, L., Prendergast, T., McHugh, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Center for Policy Research

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Center for Policy Research website at: https://centerforpolicyresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/RB1_DevelopingIn…

Child Human Trafficking: See, Pull, Cut the Threads of Abuse

Child Human Trafficking: See, Pull, Cut the Threads of Abuse
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes human trafficking as a hidden public health epidemic with an estimated 199,000 youth as young as 12-years-old who are victims. Given the covert nature of this criminal activity and the lack of self-disclosure by victims, the author encourages health care providers, particularly emergency nurses, to learn about the subtle signs of potential human trafficking among children and youth. Emergency nurses should look for young patients who present with tattoos, poor personal hygiene, suspicious injuries of abuse, and lack of medical and dental care. They should also observe the interaction between the youth and the accompanying adult. Do they seem related? Do they arrive at the hospital without any identification or documentation? Is the history provided consistent with the main reason for seeking medical attention? In addition to medical signs of trafficking, the author recommends that emergency nurses understand the legal aspects of this issue.

Accession number
25584
Authors
Normandin, P.A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Emergency Nursing

Series
Pediatric Update
Volume new
43
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.jenonline.org/article/S0099-1767(17)30416-6/pdf