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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Independent Living Programs

Youth Subgroups who Receive John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Services

Youth Subgroups who Receive John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program Services
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article looks at the underlying patterns of services receipt to prepare youth who are aging out of foster care. States are required to report John F. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP) service provision to the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD). The researchers used a population of 68,057 first-time youth who received CFCIP services in FY2011-FY2013 from the NYTD to identify underlying combinations of service receipt that may be influenced by youth-level and state-level characteristics. States could benefit from understanding existing service receipt patterns and gaps to optimize decisions on service delivery in order to meet youth needs and to identify specific services that may prepare youth aging out of foster care towards positive outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25874
Authors
Chor, K.H.B., Petras, H., Pérez, A.G.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Child and Family Studies

Volume new
27
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for download via purchase or subscription at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-017-1004-1

Transition From Foster Care to Independent Living: Ecological Predictors Associated with Outcomes

Transition From Foster Care to Independent Living: Ecological Predictors Associated with Outcomes
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Given the poor outcomes for youth aging out of foster care, and the small body of literature on what works to improve outcomes, this study was conducted to examine the youth characteristics associated with better outcomes and to explore transitional service program characteristics correlated with outcomes. A causal comparative research design was used, employing preexisting data. The researchers collected records of 329 foster youth from an agency in a large Texas urban/suburban area from the Transition Resource Action Center (TRAC) and Children’s Protective Services databases. To determine outcomes, the researchers used both TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix and case records. TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix has five domains: Education, Employment, Employability, Financial Literacy, and Shelter. The researchers examined differences in outcomes between youth who received TRAC services before and after leaving care as well as changes in overall Self-Sufficiency Matrix scores. They also analyzed which variables were predictive of scores on the Self-Sufficiency Matrix. The results of this study indicate that TRAC is having a positive influence on the youth receiving services. Youth showed significant improvement across four of the five identified domains and maintained on the fifth domain of employment. The researchers discuss the implications of these findings for future research, practice, and policy. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25544
Authors
Scannapieco, M., Smith, M., Blakeney-Strong, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
33
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available for download at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-015-0426-0

The Experience With Independent Living Services for Youth in Care and Those Formerly in Care

The Experience With Independent Living Services for Youth in Care and Those Formerly in Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This descriptive study aimed to capture the reported skills and resources of youth currently in foster care and the resources and associated documentation of youth who now live independently. The authors drew from a national data set, The National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II, and included both former foster care youth (n=127) and those currently in care (n=106). For youth formerly in care but currently living independently, 66 percent reported having three of the four recommended documents for independent living: 1) social security card, 2) birth certificate, 3) driver’s license, and 4) a form of state identification. No former foster care youth reported having all four of these documents. Of the 10 independent living skills reflected in this study, 26 percent of all youth reported having none of these skills (e.g. interviewing for a job, renting an apartment) while only 54 percent reported having five or more of these skills. In addition, most participants denied receiving resources needed to obtain these skills through independent living services. The authors discuss the implications these findings have for practice and policy related to delivering independent living services. They also offer suggestions for future research.

Accession number
25527
Authors
Thompson, H.M., Wojciak, A.S., Cooley, M.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Children and Youth Services Review

Volume new
84
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for download by subscription or article purchase: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917306916

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report looks at the relationship between extended foster care and young adult outcomes. The researchers analyzed data from three national datasets on foster care history, independent living services, and extended foster care. They found that extended foster care is associated with better young adult outcomes and receipt of independent youth services. Despite the low rates of utilization in many states, extended foster care appears to benefit young people as they transition to adulthood. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25757
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ExtendedFosterCa…