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Homelessness

Perceived Impacts, Acceptability, and Recommendations for Ecological Momentary Assessment Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Qualitative Study.

Perceived Impacts, Acceptability, and Recommendations for Ecological Momentary Assessment Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Qualitative Study.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Background: The use of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to study youth experiencing homelessness (YEH) behaviors is an emerging area of research. Despite high rates of participation and potential clinical utility, few studies have investigated the acceptability and recommendations for EMA from the YEH perspective. Objective: This study aimed to describe the perceived benefits, usability, acceptability, and barriers to the use of EMA from the homeless youth perspective. Methods: YEH were recruited from a larger EMA study. Semi-structured exit interviews were performed using an interview guide that focused on the YEH experience with the EMA app and included perceived barriers and recommendations for future studies. Data analyses used an inductive approach with thematic analysis to identify major themes and subthemes. Results: A total of 18 YEH aged 19-24 years participated in individual and group exit interviews. The EMA was highly acceptable to YEH and they found the app and EMA surveys easy to navigate. Perceived benefits included increased behavioral and emotional awareness with some YEH reporting a decrease in their high-risk behaviors as a result of participation. Another significant perceived benefit was the ability to use the phones for social support and make connections to family, friends, and potential employers. Barriers were primarily survey and technology related. Survey-related barriers included the redundancy of questions, the lack of customizable responses, and the timing of survey prompts. Technology-related barriers included the “freezing” of the app, battery charge, and connectivity issues. Recommendations for future studies included the need to provide real-time mental health support for symptomatic youth, to create individually customized questions, and to test the use of personalized motivational messages that respond to the EMA data in real time. Conclusions: YEH are highly receptive to the use of EMA in studies. Further studies are warranted to understand the impact of EMA on YEH behaviors. Incorporating the YEH perspective into the design and implementation of EMA studies may help minimize barriers, increase acceptability, and improve participation rates in this hard-to-reach, disconnected population.

Authors
Acorda, D., Businelle, M., & Santa Maria, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR Formative Research

Volume new
5
Issue
4
Year published new
2021

Research Brief #2 – Support Systems for Youth: How to Maximize Youth’s Networks in Prevention Efforts.

Research Brief #2 – Support Systems for Youth: How to Maximize Youth’s Networks in Prevention Efforts.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief focuses on social network characteristics as important determinants of social and health experience and outcomes for YYA experiencing homelessness. It shares recommendations from the research to help programs work with their young people to strengthen these key relationships. (author abstract modified)

Authors
Sohn, J.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Canadian Observatory n Homelessness

Year published new
2021

Youth Homelessness and the Juvenile Justice System: A Roadmap of What to Ask, Offer, and Expect from Referral to Reentry

Youth Homelessness and the Juvenile Justice System: A Roadmap of What to Ask, Offer, and Expect from Referral to Reentry
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides professionals in the fields of education, social services, and law enforcement with information to help identify and respond to youth who may be homeless. The guide recommends prosecutors, judges, and probation officers review juvenile cases for possible homelessness at each stage of the judicial process. The guide emphasizes the importance of re-entry planning with this population. The federal definition of youth homelessness is provided as well as questions professionals can ask youth to determine their housing status. 

Accession number
25459
Authors
Smoot, N.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/map_FINAL…

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing

Whats Next? A Theory on Identity Preservation for Young Adults in Supportive Housing
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a qualitative study of 29 young adults (ages 18 to 25) living in permanent supportive housing (PSH) about their feelings of ontological security. The authors define ontological security as a feeling of well-being derived from a sense of order from one’s social and material environment. The study found ontological security (e.g., constancy, routine, control) positively affected the participants’ mental health and well-being, which helped with positive identity construction. An increase in ontological security also related to residents’ social environment and their ability to strengthen social relationships, which supported improved mental health and sense of self. Most young adults in this study regarded living in PSH as an opportunity to start their lives over and imagine their futures in a normative developmental trajectory. 

Accession number
25666
Authors
Henwood, B.F., Redline, B., Semborski, S., Rhoades, H., Rice, E., Wenzel, S.L.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences

Using Case Records to Understand Client Experiences
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Children’s Bureau, within the Administration for Children and Families (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), funded a multi-phase grant program to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. Known as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH), this program funded 18 organizations for the first phase for two years. During the planning phase, grantees conducted data analyses to help understand their local population and develop comprehensive service models to improve outcomes in housing, education and training, social well-being, and permanent connections. For the second phase, six of the 18 organizations received funding to refine and test their comprehensive service models with a three-year implementation grant. This issue brief describes the challenges, lessons learned, and next steps of one grantee—Lighthouse Youth Services in Cincinnati, Ohio. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25490
Authors
Hicks, M., Harding, J., Mecum, B.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Mathematica Policy Research

Series
Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) Lessons from the Field
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Mathematica Policy Research website at: https://www.mathematica-mpr.com/our-publications-and-findings/publicati…

The Relationship Between Self-Reported Executive Functioning and Risk-Taking Behavior in Urban Homeless Youth

The Relationship Between Self-Reported Executive Functioning and Risk-Taking Behavior in Urban Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the relationship between the level of self-reported executive function (EF) and engagement in risk-taking behaviors among a sample of shelter-living urban homeless youth. The researcher predicted that homeless youth who have lower levels of self-reported EF would more readily engage in risky behaviors that could lead to negative outcomes. The study recruited 149 youth between 18 and 22 years of age from homeless agencies in Chicago. Of this study sample, 53 percent were female and 76 percent were African American. As part of a broader neuropsychological assessment, all participants completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The researchers assigned participants to the high self-reported EF group or the low self-reported EF group. The results showed a relationship between the level of self-reported EF and risk-taking behaviors among the participants. Those with lower self-reported executive functioning had higher rates of engagement in multiple substance-related risk-taking behaviors. By identifying factors like low self-reported EF, potential interventions could provide focused support to youth who are at higher risk for engaging in problematic behaviors. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25515
Authors
Piche, J., Kaylegian, J., Smith, D., Hunter, S.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Behavioral Sciences

Volume new
8
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-328X/8/1/6/html

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report looks at the relationship between extended foster care and young adult outcomes. The researchers analyzed data from three national datasets on foster care history, independent living services, and extended foster care. They found that extended foster care is associated with better young adult outcomes and receipt of independent youth services. Despite the low rates of utilization in many states, extended foster care appears to benefit young people as they transition to adulthood. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25757
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ExtendedFosterCa…

Suicide and Homelessness: Data Trends in Suicide and Mental Health Among Homeless Populations

Suicide and Homelessness: Data Trends in Suicide and Mental Health Among Homeless Populations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This factsheet provides data on the prevalence of suicide in the United States and information about common risk factors for the general population and the increased risks among homeless populations. The National Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Council developed this factsheet as part of a series related to emerging issues in the HCH field.  It includes data from a 2017 study that found school-age children and youth who are homeless are three times more likely to attempt suicide than their housed peers. The factsheet provides resources for additional information and support, including the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. A list of references for the data sources is also provided. 

Accession number
25549
Authors
Poe, B.
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Health Care for the Homeless Council

Year published new
2018

Strategies to Address the Intersection of the Opioid Crisis and Homelessness

Strategies to Address the Intersection of the Opioid Crisis and Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief identifies five strategies that communities, providers, and policy makers can use to address the intersection of homelessness and the opioid crisis and highlights resources developed by federal and national partners to support such efforts. It includes information about the first-ever report released by the Office of the Surgeon General on this issue called Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. The brief also includes links to webinars from the National Health Care for the Homeless Council on this topic and a toolkit for law enforcement on naxolone developed by the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance. 

Accession number
25561
Type new
Brief
Organization

United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

Year published new
2017

State Index on Youth Homelessness

State Index on Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In partnership with the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, the True Colors Fund developed the State Index on Youth Homelessness (the Index) as a summary of some of the legal, systemic, and environmental barriers youth experiencing homelessness face. The Index looks at 61 metrics in all 50 states and District of Columbia. The metrics evaluate each state’s laws and policies, systems, and environments that affect youth experiencing homelessness and influence state policy and program implementation. The Index provides recommendations for each state on how to better protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness.

Accession number
25677
Authors
Rush, J., Santos, M.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

True Colors Fund and the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the True Colors Fund website at: https://truecolorsfund.org/index/