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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Homeless Youth

Drug Use Patterns and Predictors Among Homeless Youth: Results of an Ecological Momentary Assessment

Drug Use Patterns and Predictors Among Homeless Youth: Results of an Ecological Momentary Assessment
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) to examine the effect of urges on drug use among homeless youth. Using a sample of 66 homeless youth from a drop-in center in Houston, the researchers collected daily EMA to assess patterns of drug use and the correlation between real-time contextual factors and drug use. The study sample represents predominantly unsheltered and unstably housed homeless youth ages 18 to 25 with high incidences of drug use. Alcohol use was less prevalent in the study population. EMA data indicate that marijuana was the primary class of drug used. The researchers conclude that EMA can be used to predict drug use among homeless youth. Drug use treatment among homeless youth should address how experiencing discrimination, using pornography and alcohol, and using urge management strategies affect drug use. The authors recommend additional research to determine if EMA informed just-in-time interventions targeting these predictors can reduce use. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25500
Authors
Maria, D.S., Padhye, N., Yang, Y., Gallardo, K., Santos, G., Jung, J,, Businelle, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Volume new
44
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00952990.2017.1407328

Developing a Coordinated Youth Housing Stability Program for Juvenile Courts

Developing a Coordinated Youth Housing Stability Program for Juvenile Courts
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted by a research-practice partnership between a university and a mid-sized county court in Washington State. The purpose of the study was to develop a model for reducing homelessness from within the juvenile justice system. Using a community-based participatory approach, the study analyzed data from local juvenile filings in 2017 (n=555), statewide juvenile court data from 2016 (n=6,791) and 2017 (n=6,866), and qualitative data from workgroup meetings. These data indicate that 20% to 50% of the youth who filed in juvenile court had at least one prior episode of running away or being kicked out of the home. The qualitative data revealed concerns related to using probation to address youth homelessness, the need for better methods of identification, and a lack of intensive family-based services to prevent housing instability. The article presents the juvenile court-based model and lessons learned from the research-practice partnership.

Accession number
25674
Authors
Walker, S.C., Valencia, E., Bishop, A., Irons, M., Gertsseva, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership

Counting and Surveying Homeless Youth: Recommendations from YouthCount 2.0!, a Community-Academic Partnership
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents findings from a research project initiated by a community-academic partnership to count homeless youth and conduct a survey focused on the health needs of this population. After a four-week recruitment period, the authors counted 632 youth, of which 420 were directly surveyed for this study. They found the following methodologies were the most effective: 1) using an extended counting period, 2) applying broader inclusion criteria to capture those in unstable housing, 3) using student volunteers in health training programs, 4) recruiting from magnet events for high-risk youth, and 4) partnering with community agencies to disseminate the findings. The authors found that the following strategies did not facilitate recruitment: 1) respondent-driven sampling, 2) street canvassing beyond known hotspots, and 3) community agencies leading data collection efforts. Most youth completed the self-report survey and provided detailed information about risk behaviors. In addition, the survey results captured the different housing types, including youth staying in shelters or transitional housing (n=205), those in unstable housing (n=75), and those who were on the streets or living in uninhabitable places (n=140). The article includes recommendations on how to combine research data collection with counting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25516
Authors
Narendorf, S.C., Santa Maria, D.M., Ha, Y., Cooper, J., Schieszler, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Community Health

Volume new
41
Year published new
2016
Availability

Count Us In: Seattle/King County Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness, 2017

Count Us In: Seattle/King County Point-in-Time Count of Persons Experiencing Homelessness, 2017
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Count Us In (formerly known as the One Night Count) is the annual Point-in-Time (PIT) Count of individuals, youth, and families experiencing homelessness in Seattle/King County, Washington. For the 2017 count, All Home, the organization tasked with conducting Count Us In, implemented improved data collection methods for obtaining comprehensive, accurate, and actionable data. Methodology changes include: 1) countywide participation of paid guides and surveyors who were individuals with current or recent lived experience with homelessness engaged in the data collection process; 2) a shift from a known areas approach to a canvassing of census tracts in King County; 3) a sample-based qualitative survey including shelter and service locations, as well as street locations; and 4) the incorporation of a youth and young adult count component focused on unaccompanied youth and young adults under 25 years, previously conducted separately. On the night of the 2017 PIT Count, there were 11,643 people experiencing homelessness. Forty-seven percent of this population was unsheltered, living on the street, in parks, encampments, vehicles, or other places. An estimated 2,833 individuals were in families with children and 1,498 individuals were unaccompanied youth and young adults. More than three-quarters of unaccompanied youth and young adults were unsheltered.  

Accession number
25421
Authors
All Home, Applied Survey Research
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

All Home, Seattle, WA

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for download free of charge from the All Home website at http://allhomekc.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/2017-Count-Us-In-PIT-Co….

Count Me! Hidden in Plain Sight: Documenting Homeless Youth Populations

Count Me! Hidden in Plain Sight: Documenting Homeless Youth Populations
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes the process used by Bill Wilson Center to count the population of homeless youth and young adults, ages 13 to 25, in Santa Clara County, California. The count was undertaken to determine the extent of youth homelessness in the area and plan services accordingly. Two distinct counts took place--the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Point-in-Time count was conducted in January 2017 and a high school and community college survey was administered to a sampling of schools during winter 2016 through spring 2017. The report also includes information on high risk populations for homelessness and results of a study completed by the University of Southern California (USC) on the characteristrics of 208 homeless street young adults to help compile a unique profile of this population. Findings of the homeless student survey are that 17 percent of surveyed high school students indicated they were unhoused or knew another youth who was homeless. Forty-four percent of community college students reported experiencing homelessness or knowing someone who was homeless sometime in the past six months. Of the 208 homeless street youth who participated in the USC survey, 40 percent qualified as chronically homeless, 45 percent were kicked out of the family home, 43 percent had a caregiver in prison, and 25 percent were parents themselves. The report also provides lessons learned while planning and undertaking the study and recommendations for conducting a count that provides a more complete picture of the issue than the HUD point-in-time count.  

Accession number
25390
Authors
Bill Wilson Center
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Bill Wilson Center: http://acouchisnotahome.org/acouchisnotahome/home.html.

Coordinated Entry for Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Coordinated Entry for Youth Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides information for youth housing and service providers with an overview of the four key Coordinated Entry (CE) elements: Access, Assessment, Prioritization, and Referral. The CE process provides youth who are experiencing homelessness better access to the housing and services best suited for them. This brief outlines the main considerations for CE processes specifically for youth, key decisions points within the process, and community examples of coordinated entry for youth.

Accession number
25615
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the HUD Exchange website at: https://www.hudexchange.info/resources/documents/coordinated-entry-for-…

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This volume of the journal Cityscape from the US Department Housing and Urban Development includes a collection of peer-reviewed research on youth homelessness. The stated objective of the journal is to bring high-quality research on housing and community development issues to scholars, government officials, and practitioners. This volume covers housing and homelessness issues related to LGBTQ youth, youth service engagement, out-of-care placements, identity preservation, and coordinated housing programs for juvenile courts. Two additional articles provide information about youth homelessness in Canada and Australia.

Accession number
25665
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness

Canadian Definition of Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides the official definition of youth homelessness as developed by the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness. It discusses why a definition of youth homelessness should be distinguished from adult homelessness. For young people, homelessness not only involves the lack of stable housing but also the absence of a home where they are embedded in relations of dependence. The report provides a typology of homelessness and housing insecurity: unsheltered, emergency sheltered, provisionally accommodated, and at risk of homelessness. An appendix is provided for the full typology. The report outlines the key differences within the youth homelessness population in terms of age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. It discusses the different pathways to youth homelessness: individual and relational factors, structural factors, and systems failures. The report discusses the short- and long-term effects homelessness may have on youth related to physical and mental health, exploitation and victimization, criminality and street lifestyles, and lack of education from school dropout. The report also lists challenges faced by young people due to the lack of adequate services and resources. Canada has signed four core United Nations human rights agreements related to homeless youth. 

Accession number
25444
Authors
Canadian Observatory on Homelessness
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness website at: http://homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/Definition_of_Youth_Homelessn…

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth

Building Partnerships to Support Stable Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families and Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide from the Child Welfare Information Gateway outlines affordable housing and homelessness services and how child welfare professionals can collaborate with those systems to help families. Although primarily for child welfare professionals, the information may help housing and homelessness services providers understand the needs and concerns of child welfare-involved youth and families and what services are available to them. The guide features grantee programs focused on child welfare and housing collaboration that were part of the Partnerships to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System (SHF) and Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) grant clusters. 

Accession number
25676
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Childrens Bureau

Series
Bulletin for Professionals
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the Child Welfare Information Gateway at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/bulletins_housing.pdf

Atlanta Youth Count 2018 Community Report

Atlanta Youth Count 2018 Community Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents the 2018 Atlanta Youth Count (AYC18) study of sex and labor trafficking among youth experiencing homelessness in metropolitan Atlanta. The researchers used capture-recapture field sampling methods to locate homeless youth, ages 14 to 25, who did not have a permanent, stable residence and were living independently without consistent parental or family support. The study participants completed a brief survey about their demographic background, history of homelessness, including exploitative sex and labor trafficking involvement, and certain social experiences and behavioral characteristics. The report concludes that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at higher risk of being trafficked; gender identity definitions need further understanding to help LGBT youth who are trafficking victims; early intervention is critical to preventing trafficking; and trauma-informed care is necessary to help youth who have been trafficked. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25816
Authors
Wright, E.R, LaBoy, A., Turner, M.D., Forge, N., Wallace, C., Darkwa, A., Tsukerman, K., Webb, Z., Shelby, R.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Georgia State University

Series
Atlanta Youth Count!
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download at: https://atlantayouthcount.weebly.com/