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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Homeless Youth

Research Brief #2 – Support Systems for Youth: How to Maximize Youth’s Networks in Prevention Efforts.

Research Brief #2 – Support Systems for Youth: How to Maximize Youth’s Networks in Prevention Efforts.
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief focuses on social network characteristics as important determinants of social and health experience and outcomes for YYA experiencing homelessness. It shares recommendations from the research to help programs work with their young people to strengthen these key relationships. (author abstract modified)

Authors
Sohn, J.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Canadian Observatory n Homelessness

Year published new
2021

Overcoming Rural Specific Obstacles to Ending Youth Homelessness

Overcoming Rural Specific Obstacles to Ending Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief describes the offerings of community-based solutions to address homelessness in rural Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program (YHDP) sites. The brief offers community-based solutions to these obstacles to provide rural partners with ideas on addressing their own obstacles towards ending youth homelessness. (author abstract modified)

Authors
HUD
Type new
Brief
Organization

The Department of Housing and Urban Development

Source

Homeless youth, Youth experiencing homelessness, Homelessness and rural communities, Youth, Community initiative

Year published new
2021

YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth

YTH StreetConnect: Development and Usability of a Mobile App for Homeless and Unstably Housed Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study with the objective to develop a mobile app, called YTH StreetConnect, to support homeless and unstably housed (H/UH) youth and their providers in accessing health care and vital resources. In Phase I, the researchers conducted a literature review on mobile phone and internet usage by H/UH youth and interviewed H/UH providers to inform the app prototype development process. In Phase II, they conducted focus groups with H/UH youth participants to test the usability of the YTH StreetConnect app. From the usability testing, participants proposed improvements to the app, including visual updates to the user interface, map icons, new underrepresented resource categories, and the addition of a peer-rating system. The study found that YTH StreetConnect is a promising way to increase service utilization, provide referral access, and share resources among H/UH youth and providers. The feedback garnered from H/UH youth and providers offers insights on how to improve future models of YTH StreetConnect and similar programs that assist H/UH youth.

Accession number
25564
Authors
Sheoran, B., Silva, C.L., Lykens, J.E., Gamedze, L., Williams, S., Ford, J.V., Habel, M.A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Volume new
4
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available online free of charge: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965613/

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?

Youth Homelessness and Vulnerability: How Does Couch Surfing Fit?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents emerging findings regarding couch surfing and youth homelessness. The authors use data from a national survey of 13,113 adults with youth ages 13 to 25 in their households or who are themselves ages 18 to 25. Findings suggest that couch surfing is relatively common, particularly among the older age group in this study. Households with youth in these age ranges reported couch surfing in the last 12 months: 4 percent among the younger youth and 20 percent among the older youth. The authors found notable social, economic, and educational differences between youth reporting homelessness and those reporting only couch surfing. However, most youth who reported experiencing homelessness also reported couch surfing. Youth who experienced both circumstances presented high levels of socioeconomic vulnerability. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25627
Authors
Curry, S.R., Morton, M., Matjasko, J.L., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Schlueter, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
60
Year published new
2017
Availability

Utilizing Participatory Mapping and GIS to Examine the Activity Spaces of Homeless Youth

Utilizing Participatory Mapping and GIS to Examine the Activity Spaces of Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that employed participatory mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to examine the spatial and social environments of homeless youth as they navigated life on the streets. The researchers recruited 28 youth experiencing homelessness in Portland, Oregon, to assess their sense of community and psychological well-being as they moved throughout the city. The results of this study suggest that youth engage most frequently in homeless service-related activities, and their participation in activities is significantly associated with a sense of community and psychological well-being. The researchers discuss how innovative participatory methods can help better understand the diverse experiences of homeless youth as well as having practical implications. For example, service providers could use the participant maps and activity spaces the homeless youth create to inform targets of intervention and goal setting. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25555
Authors
Townley, G., Pearson, L., Lehrwyn, J.M., Prophet, N., Trauernicht, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Community Psychology

Volume new
57
Year published new
2016
Availability

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about key applicable Texas and federal laws on emergency shelter/housing, emancipation, public education, medical treatment, and eligibility for state and federal benefits and how they apply to runaway, homeless, and unaccompanied youth. It also identifies how providers can empower youth voices and help youth understand their rights and responsibilities, as well as appreciate and uinderstand the cultural diversity among homeless youth. The last chapter identifies the benefits of collaborative relationships between youth service agencies and law enforcement and juvenile justice systems. Each section contains answers to freqently asked questions related to each subject and offers general guidelines for most situations. Also included are definitions of common terms and phrases used in the law and by government organizations. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25422
Authors
Texas Network of Youth Services
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for download free of charge on the Texas Network of Youth Services website at http://tnoys.org/wp-content/uploads/Youth-Rights-Guide_New-Version-2.pdf.

Understanding the Link Between Victimization and Alcohol Use Among Homeless Youth Using Ecological Momentary Assessment

Understanding the Link Between Victimization and Alcohol Use Among Homeless Youth Using Ecological Momentary Assessment
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used ecological momentary assessment to look at victimization and alcohol use among homeless youth. Prior research on this topic was retrospective and thus did not capture the sequencing of events. The researchers used short message service surveying with 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 over 30 days. The results reveal that experiencing physical or sexual victimization on a specific day was positively associated with youth’s drinking alcohol later that day. Because this study method allows for such specificity, the authors contend that they can link a specific victimization experience with a current drinking episode. Thus, the time ordering of daily events in the current study is a significant improvement over prior research. Understanding the timing between victimization and drinking alcohol is also important for intervention with this underserved population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25604
Authors
Tyler, K.A., Olson, K., Ray, C.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World

Volume new
4
Year published new
2018
Availability

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the sixth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. In collaboration with the University of Southern California and Youth Collaboratory, Chapin Hall published this brief about how communities use a common risk assessment and prioritization tool for youth experiencing homelessness (the TAY-VI-SPDAT: Next Step Tool). The authors found that a common risk assessment tool for youth can effectively help local systems prioritize limited housing resources. They also found positive outcomes associated with housing programs for youth. Youth of color were more likely to come into homelessness system and remained in homelessness systems for longer periods, tending to have fewer successful exits from homelessness by returning to their families. These findings highlight further opportunities for systems to focis on racial equite in addressing the homelessness challenge. The lessons from this analysis bolster the idea that communities can build collective intake and assessment (coordinated entry) systems, develop creative service delivery approaches for youth who do not immediately receive housing, and strengthen data to measure and improve long-term outcomes. The study also looked at how risk assessment scores related to services offered to young people and to their exits from homelessness. Finally, they examined how many youth receiving different types of services remained out of homelessness systems and which youth were most likely to return. This brief summarizes key findings and implications for action for communities and funders.

Accession number
25626
Authors
Morton, M.H., Rice, E., Blondin, M., Hsu, H., Kull, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Youth Collaboratory website at: https://youthcollaboratory.org/sites/default/files/attachments/2018-11/…

Tips for Homeless Higher Education Liaisons

Tips for Homeless Higher Education Liaisons
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This resource from SchoolHouse Connection provides information for higher education liaisons to support postsecondary students who are experiencing homelessness. It defines homelessness and provides signs to look for to help identify students who may need support. This tip sheet outlines strategies for liaisons to connect students to on-campus and off-campus resources and remove barriers to their college retention and success.

Accession number
25813
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Tips-f…

The Relationship Between Self-Reported Executive Functioning and Risk-Taking Behavior in Urban Homeless Youth

The Relationship Between Self-Reported Executive Functioning and Risk-Taking Behavior in Urban Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined the relationship between the level of self-reported executive function (EF) and engagement in risk-taking behaviors among a sample of shelter-living urban homeless youth. The researcher predicted that homeless youth who have lower levels of self-reported EF would more readily engage in risky behaviors that could lead to negative outcomes. The study recruited 149 youth between 18 and 22 years of age from homeless agencies in Chicago. Of this study sample, 53 percent were female and 76 percent were African American. As part of a broader neuropsychological assessment, all participants completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The researchers assigned participants to the high self-reported EF group or the low self-reported EF group. The results showed a relationship between the level of self-reported EF and risk-taking behaviors among the participants. Those with lower self-reported executive functioning had higher rates of engagement in multiple substance-related risk-taking behaviors. By identifying factors like low self-reported EF, potential interventions could provide focused support to youth who are at higher risk for engaging in problematic behaviors. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25515
Authors
Piche, J., Kaylegian, J., Smith, D., Hunter, S.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Behavioral Sciences

Volume new
8
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-328X/8/1/6/html