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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Homeless Students

Using a Person-Centered Approach to Examine the Impact of Homelessness on School Absences

Using a Person-Centered Approach to Examine the Impact of Homelessness on School Absences
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used a person-centered approach to compare the number of school absences of homeless students with their housed peers. The researchers designed this study to test the theory that homeless students often miss an inordinate amount of school days and are thought to be at the end of the “continuum of poverty.” Using school administrative data collected over one school year for an entire school district, the researchers found that homeless children as an aggregate do not miss significantly more days of school than housed students receiving free lunch. However, they found that homelessness and poverty dramatically increase the number of absences for children who are in the higher percentiles of absences, meaning homelessness has a greater impact on those who miss more days of school in general compared with regular attendees. Findings from this study indicate that homelessness may exacerbate problems rather than cause them. The researchers discuss implications for practice and propose directions for future study. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25542
Authors
Canfield, J.P., Nolan, J., Harley, D., Hardy, A., Elliott, W.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
33
Year published new
2016
Availability

This Is How Im Going to Make a Life for Myself: An Analysis of FAFSA Data and Barriers to Financial Aid for Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

This Is How Im Going to Make a Life for Myself: An Analysis of FAFSA Data and Barriers to Financial Aid for Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from SchoolHouse Connection looks at the challenges that many unaccompanied homeless students encounter when they apply for federal financial aid. Using data from the U.S. Department of Education, the report outlines ongoing barriers such as the definition of “youth” for 22- and 23-year-olds and required homeless determination from school districts, homeless service providers, or post-secondary institutions. This report provides state-level data and recommendations for policy and practice changes going forward.

Accession number
25803
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/new-report-highlights-fafsa-chall…

The Importance of Fostering Positive School Climates for Homeless High School Students

The Importance of Fostering Positive School Climates for Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness (ICPH) discusses how supportive school climates can help improve academic and mental health outcomes for high school students dealing with housing instability. According to ICPH, a supportive school climate can provide these students with a sense of safety and stability. ICPH uses self-reported data from the 2016-2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey to look at school climate indicators: school engagement, safety, and environment of homeless students compared with their housed peers. The report measures the cumulative impact of school climate by these negative indicators: bullying; missing school due to feeling unsafe; lacking positive relationships with teachers or adults at school; and being offered, sold, or given illicit drugs on school property.

Accession number
25848
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/the-importance-of-fostering-positive-sc…

Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Students Experiencing Homelessness

Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education describes the educational challenges faced by unaccompanied youth who are experiencing homelessness and outlines the key provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act related to this student population. The brief presents strategies school districts can use to support the educational success of unaccompanied youth. Additional resources are provided. 

Accession number
25660
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
McKinney-Vento Law Into Practice Brief Series
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Center for Homeless Education website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/youth.pdf

Supporting the Attendance of Students Experiencing Homelessness

Supporting the Attendance of Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief provides an overview of strategies that schools, districts, and communities are implementing to help students experiencing homelessness attend school every day. To overcome chronic absenteeism, educators are helping students meet their basic needs, devising creative ways with transportation support, investing in evidence-based truancy reduction and prevention programs, implementing early warning systems, and taking a team approach to attendance. The brief highlights programs using these strategies and provides additional resources. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25855
Authors
Authors SchoolHhouse Connection
Type new
Brief
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Year published new
2020
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/supporting-attendance/

Supporting In-School and Out-of-School Youth Experiencing Homelessness Through Education and Workforce Partnerships

Supporting In-School and Out-of-School Youth Experiencing Homelessness Through Education and Workforce Partnerships
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education provides an overview of education and workforce programs that serve students who are experiencing homelessness. It provides information about the education and workforce partners who work with this population and recommends how these partners can improve coordination and provide more comprehensive support for youth.

Accession number
25673
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the NCHE website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/labor-ed-collab.pdf

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents key findings from a study that shows homeless students are at significantly higher risk for suicide than the general high school student population. This study uses data from eight states and New York City, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collects through the self-reported Youth Risk Behavior Survey. ICPH recommends increasing the availability of mental health care services within schools, training teachers and school staff about trauma-informed care, and targeting services for homeless LGBTQ students.

Accession number
25731
Type new
Brief
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/suicide-and-depression-among-homeless-h…

Student Homelessness in Rural America

Student Homelessness in Rural America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents national and state-level trends showing the highest rate of growth for student homelessness is occurring in rural communities. The U.S. Census Bureau defines rural communities as those located geographically outside of urbanized areas with fewer than 2,500 residents. ICPH found that over four school years from 2013 to 2017, the number of homeless students in rural areas increased by 11% compared with 3% nationwide. This report discusses the challenges of identifying and supporting these students and their families, federal funding levels to rural school districts, and the obstacles these students face specific to their rural environment. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25716
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Series
Community
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/ruralreport/#thirty-eight-states-experi…

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at disruptions that often coincide with the experience of housing stability, such as mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism, can threaten the educational stability. Consequently, these school instability factors may negatively affect academic performance and ruin a student’s ability to graduate. This report focuses on mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism and how to support students experiencing homelessness so they can fully experience the same educational opportunities as their housed peers. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25726
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SH_SchoolInstability…

Student Homelessness in New York City: Disparities in Academic Achievement

Student Homelessness in New York City: Disparities in Academic Achievement
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at the disparities in academic performance between students who have experienced homelessness and their housed peers using data from state-mandated English Language Arts (ELA) and math exams. Homeless students were more likely to score at the lowest performance level on state assessments. ICPH determined that attendance and school instability are two of the strongest factors correlated with student performance. This disparity in academic performance leaves homeless students at a disadvantage to prepare adequately for future coursework and eventually graduate from high school. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25858
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness

Series
Student Homelessness in New York City
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/disparities-in-academic-achievement/