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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Homeless Shelters

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?

Predicting Repeated and Persistent Family Homelessness: Do Families Characteristics and Experiences Matter?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), looks at whether family characteristics can identify repeated or persistent experiences of homelessness before and after a shelter stay. OPRE analyzed data of 2,282 families from the larger Family Options Study to determine if practitioners in the field can identify families who will experience repeated or persistent homelessness and thus will need additional support.

Accession number
25714
Authors
Glendening, Z., Shinn, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_persistent_homele…

On-Ramps, Intersections, and Exit Routes: A Roadmap for Systems and Industries to Prevent and Disrupt Human Trafficking

On-Ramps, Intersections, and Exit Routes: A Roadmap for Systems and Industries to Prevent and Disrupt Human Trafficking
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Polaris Project discusses how human trafficking business models attempt to intersect with and use legitimate businesses to recruit and exploit victims. These legitimate business industries include financial services, social media, hospitality, transportation, health care, and housing and homelessness systems. This report, a follow-up to The Typology of Modern Slavery, also looks at how victims can work with the same business systems to help free themselves from trafficking and begin to rebuild their lives. Polaris examines how businesses could help prevent and impede trafficking and provide aid to survivors. The report includes ideas and personal narratives shared with the authors by survivors of trafficking.

Accession number
25745
Authors
Anthony, B.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Polaris Project

Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free on the Polaris Project website at: https://polarisproject.org/sites/default/files/A%20Roadmap%20for%20Syst…

Labor and Sex Trafficking Among Homeless Youth--A Ten-City Study: Full Report

Labor and Sex Trafficking Among Homeless Youth--A Ten-City Study: Full Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This document is the full report of the Modern Slavery Research Project study of sex and labor trafficking among youth, which replicated and expanded earlier studies conducted by Fordham University/Covenant House New York and Loyola University New Orleans/Covenant House New Orleans. At the invitation of Covenant House International and 10 of its individual sites in the United States and Canada, researchers from Loyola University New Orleans Modern Slavery Research Project (MSRP) conducted a study examining the prevalence and nature of human trafficking among homeless youth aged 17 to 25. The researchers interviewed 641 homeless and runaway youth who access services through Covenant Houses network of shelters, transitional living and apartment programs, and drop-in centers using the Human Trafficking Interview and Assessment Measure (HTIAM-14) to assess whether youth had been trafficked for sex or labor in their lifetimes. The study found that 19 percent of the 641 youth were identified as victims of some sort of human trafficking. More than 14 percent had been trafficked for sex while 8 percent had been trafficked for other forced labor. Three percent were trafficked for both sex and labor. Homeless youth are vulnerable to both sex and labor trafficking because they tend to experience a higher rate of the primary risk factors to trafficking: poverty, unemployment, a history of sexual abuse, and a history of mental health issues. The researchers conclude that runaway and homeless youth shelters and programs should be equipped to meet the needs of trafficked youth because they are able to address the root economic and societal problems that make youth vulnerable to exploitation. With programs directly responsive to the heightened needs of trafficking victims, shelters can effectively help trafficking survivors and prevent other youth from being expkloited using an approach that includes prevention, outreach, confidential and inclusive identification, and specialized interventions. 

Accession number
25406
Authors
Murphy, L.T.
Organization

Modern Slavery Research Project, Loyola University New Orleans

Year published new
2017

Labor and Sex Trafficking Among Homeless Youth--A Ten-City Study: Executive Summary

Labor and Sex Trafficking Among Homeless Youth--A Ten-City Study: Executive Summary
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This document is the executive summary of the full report describing a study examining sex and labor trafficking among youth. At the invitation of Covenant House International and 10 of its individual sites in the United States and Canada, researchers from Loyola University New Orleans Modern Slavery Research Project (MSRP) conducted a study examining the prevalence and nature of human trafficking among homeless youth aged 17 to 25. The researchers interviewed 641 homeless and runaway youth who access services through Covenant Houses network of shelters, transitional living and apartment programs, and drop-in centers using the Human Trafficking Interview and Assessment Measure (HTIAM-14) to assess whether youth had been trafficked for sex or labor in their lifetimes. The study found that 19 percent of the 641 youth were identified as victims of some sort of human trafficking. More than 14 percent had been trafficked for sex while 8 percent had been trafficked for other forced labor. Three percent were trafficked for both sex and labor. Homeless youth are vulnerable to both sex and labor trafficking because they tend to experience a higher rate of the primary risk factors to trafficking: poverty, unemployment, a history of sexual abuse, and a history of mental health issues. The researchers conclude that runaway and homeless youth shelters and programs should be equipped to meet the needs of trafficked youth because they are able to address the root economic and societal problems that make youth vulnerable to exploitation. With programs directly responsive to the heightened needs of trafficking victims, shelters can effectively help trafficking survivors and prevent other youth from being exploited using an approach that includes prevention, outreach, confidential and inclusive identification, and specialized interventions. 

Accession number
25405
Authors
Murphy, L.T.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Modern Slavery Research Project, Loyola University New Orleans

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of cost from Covenant House International at https://covenanthousestudy.org/landing/trafficking/docs/Loyola-Research….

For Youth, By Youth: A Third Student-Run Homeless Shelter

For Youth, By Youth: A Third Student-Run Homeless Shelter
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This article describes how the Youth-to-Youth (Y2Y), a homeless shelter exclusively for young adults ages 18 to 24, was established as the third student-run homeless shelter in the country. Two Harvard graduates saw a need within the Boston and Cambridge communities for a homeless shelter serving young adults. Drawing upon their experience volunteering as college students at the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter, the countrys first student-run homeless shelter, they worked with Harvard undergraduates to open Y2Y. College students from Villanova, Temple, Drexel, Swarthmore, and the University of Pennsylvania established the second shelter, called the Student-Run Emergency Housing Unit, in Philadelphia in 2012. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25525
Authors
Seider, S.C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of College & Character

Volume new
17
Year published new
2016
Availability

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) looks at the long-term effectiveness of various programs to address homelessness for families with children. The Family Options Study randomly assigned 2,282 families to four housing or services interventions between September 2010 and January 2012 across 12 sites nationwide. The interventions were 1) permanent housing subsidies, 2) community-based rapid rehousing, 3) project-based transitional housing, and 4) usual care (emergency shelter and housing or services that families can access without immediate referral to a program that would provide them with a place to live). Each family participating in the study had spent at least seven days in emergency shelter and had at least one child age 15 or younger at the point of enrollment. The study found that families offered a subsidy experienced less than half as many episodes of subsequent homelessness as well as improvements in measures related to residential stability, food security, and other non-housing domains compared with families offered the other three interventions. 

Accession number
25683
Authors
Gubits, D., Shinn, M., Wood, M., Bell, S., Dastrup, S., Solari, C.D., Brown, S.R., McInnis, D., McCall, T., Kattel, U.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on HUD User website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/sites/default/files/pdf/Family-Options-S…

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall describes a study to provide an estimate of the size of the homeless youth population and its characteristics in three central Florida counties (Orange, Osceola, and Seminole). Information was also gathered about the types of services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Over three days, the project surveyed youth on the street and in services, which include shelters, transitional living programs, and drop-in centers. In addition, researchers examined data from the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and school systems. Findings include: 1) On a single night in October 2017, there was a total of 268 homeless and unstably housed youth ages 13 to 24 in the three counties. 2) Twelve percent of the surveyed homeless and unstably housed youth were 13 to 17 years old. 3) Youth in the foster care and justice systems were overrepresented in the three counties. 4) Providers in the three counties have 104 shelter, transitional living, rapid rehousing, and subsidized affordable housing slots available for youth, only 10 of which serve youth under age 18. 

Accession number
25739
Authors
Chrisler, A., Horwitz, B., Morton, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/central-florida-count-identifies-se…

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?

Are Homeless Families Connected to the Social Safety Net?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief, from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), examines whether families experiencing homelessness are connected to the benefits and services of the social safety net. Using data from the Family Options Study, researchers found these families were participating in TANF cash assistance, publicly funded health insurance programs (e.g. Medicaid, CHIP, or other state-funded programs), and SNAP at similar or higher rates than other poor families in the same communities. One exception was WIC where recently homeless families participated at lower rates compared with other families. Twenty months after being in a shelter, most families were no longer homeless but remained poor and continued receiving public benefits. Furthermore, families with recent episodes of homelessness enrolled their preschoolers in early education or center-based care at higher rates than all children in families below the poverty line.

Accession number
25687
Authors
Burt, M.R., Khadduri, J., Gubits, D.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the OPRE website at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/198426/HomelessSafetyNet.pdf

A Test of Outreach and Drop-in Linkage Versus Shelter Linkage for Connecting Homeless Youth to Services

A Test of Outreach and Drop-in Linkage Versus Shelter Linkage for Connecting Homeless Youth to Services
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to engage non-service-connected homeless youth (n=79) in a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention. The youth were randomly assigned to receive six months of advocacy that focused on linking youth to a drop-in center (n=40) or to a crisis shelter (n=39). For all participants, the researchers conducted one pre-baseline assessment and post-baseline assessments at three, six, and nine months. The findings indicate that youth preferred the drop-in centers to the crisis shelters. The drop-in center linkage condition was associated with connecting youth to more services and with better outcomes among alcohol and HIV-related domains compared with shelter linkage conditions. These findings highlight the importance of outreach and service linkage for reconnecting service-marginalized youth, and drop-in centers as a primary service option for homeless youth. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25514
Authors
Slesnick, N., Feng, X., Guo, X., Brakenhoff, B., Carmona, J., Murnan, A., Cash, S., McRee, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Prevention Science

Volume new
17
Year published new
2016
Availability