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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

High Risk Youth

Virtual Reality Meditation Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Feasibility

Virtual Reality Meditation Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Feasibility
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Mindfulness-based interventions that include meditation and mindfulness skills training reduce stress and symptoms of anxiety or depression. However, engaging high-risk youth in interventions is challenging. Virtual reality is a more flexible platform for delivering meditation and may be appealing to youth. Objective: The study objectives were to evaluate the feasibility of delivering virtual reality meditation and of collecting outcome measures, including anxiety and physiologic stress. Methods: A sample of 30 youth experiencing homelessness was enrolled in the study. Youth were randomized to receive 10 minutes of one of three interventions: (1) virtual reality meditation, (2) audio meditation (through a web-based platform), or (3) virtual reality imagery of historical pictures and text. Subjects who consented to the study attended two research visits. The first visit collected survey measures of demographics, mental health, and substance use, and oriented subjects to the intervention platforms. The second visit (1-3 days later) delivered the intervention and collected pre and post outcome measures of anxiety and physiologic stress (salivary cortisol). Changes in anxiety and cortisol at the second visit were compared across groups using a linear regression model in which the primary analysis compared virtual reality meditation to audio meditation and secondary analyses compared virtual reality meditation to virtual reality imagery. Results: Anxiety scores decreased in all groups, with a larger reduction among the virtual reality meditation group (difference=10.8) compared to the web-based meditation or virtual reality images groups (difference=5.8 and 5.0, respectively). After controlling for baseline values, there were no significant group differences in changes in anxiety scores or cortisol levels. In comparing virtual reality meditation and audio meditation, the effect size for anxiety was moderate (Cohen d=0.58) while the effect size for cortisol was small (Cohen d=0.08). Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that virtual reality meditation has a moderate benefit for anxiety but not physiologic stress. Future research is needed to confirm these results in a larger sample and to investigate whether the effects are sustained or increase with repeated use of virtual reality mediation. Virtual reality meditation appears feasible to deliver among homeless youth and merits further study.

Authors
Chavez L.J., Kelleher K., Slesnick N., Holowacz E., Luthy E., Moore L., & Ford, J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR Mental Health

Volume new
7
Issue
9
Source

7(9):e18244. doi: 10.2196/18244

Year published new
2020

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth

Toward a System Response to Ending Youth Homelessness: New Evidence to Help Communities Strengthen Coordinated Entry, Assessment, and Support for Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This one-page summary from Chapin Hall presents five findings from a study designed to help communities to develop coordinated, system-level responses to youth homelessness. Using a large national data set, the researchers analyze how risk assessment scores of young people, ages 15 to 22, relate to the services they receive. The researchers provide recommendations for stakeholders regarding coordinated entry, assessment, and support for youth in their communities. 

Accession number
25735
Authors
Morton, M., Rice, E., Blondin, M., Hsu, H., Kull, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/1pgr_Toward-a-System-Resp…

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes an evaluation of an intensive client management program, called Promotor Pathway, that aims to help high-risk and disconnected youth overcome significant life obstacles such as lack of education, homelessness, trauma, substance abuse, and court involvement. The Washington, DC-based Latin American Youth Center launched this program is 2008. At the core of the program is the premise that long-term, positive relationships with caring adults, or promotors, is the most important factor in helping youth reach their goals. The team of Urban Institute evaluators conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether the Promotor Pathway program improved the outcomes of youth in educational attainment, employment, reduced births, residential stability, and reduced risk-taking behaviors. They found that youth who had a promotor were more likely than the control group to use services by the end of the 18-month trial period. The youth with promotors were up to 30 percent more likely to receive services for mental health counseling, substance use, public assistance, and legal problems.

Accession number
25597
Authors
Theodos, B., Pergamit, M.R., Derian, A., Edelstein, S., Stolte, A.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge on the Urban Institutes website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/solutions-youth-evaluation-l…

Mentoring At-Risk Youth: An Examination of Strain and Mentor Response Strategies

Mentoring At-Risk Youth: An Examination of Strain and Mentor Response Strategies
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used qualitative in-depth interviews with 13 mentors in a school-based program to learn about their perceptions of the strain experienced by their mentees, and how they respond to it during sessions. The study looked at a national mentorship program implemented in two middle schools in a southeastern metropolitan area of the US. The researchers focused on emotional regulation, conflict resolution, future orientation, and active listening as positive coping strategies associated with enhanced resilience among at-risk youth. The study considers how these four positive strategies fit into the mentors’ descriptions of their approaches and the implications for intervention programming. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25600
Authors
Wesley, J.K., Dzoba, N.P., Miller, H.V., Rasche, C.E.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

American Journal of Criminal Justice

Volume new
42
Year published new
2017
Availability

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice

Implementing Change: Law Enforcements Role in Addressing the Intersection of Homelessness and Juvenile Justice
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ) developed this issue brief to help law enforcement better understand its role in addressing the intersections between juvenile justice and youth homelessness. It provides recommendations based on the CJJ Principles for Change and highlights local examples of successful implementation of these recommendations. CJJ contends that through proper training and by collaborating with local leaders, homeless programs, juvenile justice agencies, and other stakeholders, law enforcement can play an important role in improving outcomes for vulnerable youth and ensuring that young people do not experience homelessness as a result of justice involvement, or come into contact with the system as a result of their lack of stable and secure housing.

Accession number
25696
Type new
Brief
Organization

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Series
Implementing Change
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/resource-files/Law%20Enfo…

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Rural State: Interviews With Adjudicated Female Juveniles

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking in a Rural State: Interviews With Adjudicated Female Juveniles
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that sought to better understand domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) among adjudicated juvenile females and to identify factors associated with DMST for this vulnerable population. The authors examined the pathways in and out of DMST from the victims’ perspective (especially rural versus urban). They conducted qualitative interviews with 40 adjudicated juvenile females, ages 14 to 19, in a southern, rural state. The quantitative results indicate 34 percent of the participants engaged in sex trafficking, mostly to obtain drugs, and 31 percent felt forced to perform sex acts in exchange for drugs or for a place to sleep, which was highly correlated with being a victim of sexual abuse. The authors recommend implementing early intervention programs for juvenile females who fit the noted vulnerabilities to prevent this population from being victimized. They suggest learning more about risk factors, especially contentious family dynamics, so that social workers and foster parents can help these young women before they age out of foster care or the juvenile justice system and fall prey to traffickers.

Accession number
25581
Authors
Perkins, E.B., Ruiz, C.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
34
Year published new
2017
Availability

Common Themes in the Life Stories of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in High School: Implications for Educators

Common Themes in the Life Stories of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in High School: Implications for Educators
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study of the life stories of unaccompanied homeless youth (UHY) who continued to attend high school despite no longer being in the custody of a parent or guardian. The study used a qualitative approach to allow participants to share their life stories in their own words. The researchers recruited nine students (five males, four females) ranging in age from 17 to 20 from a community-based organization serving homeless youth to participate in individual interviews. A thematic analysis revealed nine themes that reflected chaotic, impoverished, and abusive family environments in combination with individual and extrafamilial factors that helped to promote resilience among the participants. The authors discuss implications for supporting UHY in schools. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25632
Authors
Mendez, L.M.R., Dickinson, S., Esposito, E., Connolly, J., Bonilla, L.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Contemporary School Psychology

Volume new
22
Year published new
2018
Availability