Skip to main content
National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Girls

Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls Childhood

Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls Childhood
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes a study conducted to determine whether adults assign African American girls qualities that render them more like adults--and less innocent--than their white peers. The authors surveyed a community sample of 325 adults from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and different educational levels across the U.S. Participants were predominantly white (74 percent) and female (62 percent). They each completed one of two randomly assigned questionnaires--one asking about respondents perceptions of African American girls and the other asking about white girls. Responses to the two sets of questions were compared and analyzed. Across all age ranges, participants viewed African American girls as more adult than white girls and as needing less protection and nurturing. They were also perceived by respondents as being more knowledgeable about sex than their white peers. Results indicate that African American girls are viewed as more adult than their white peers at almost all stages of childhood, beginning most significantly at the age of five. The researchers suggest that these results may be a contributing cause of demonstrated harsher treatment of African American girls conpared to white girls of the same age. That is, adultification may serve as a contributing cause of disproportionality in school discipline outcomes, harsher treatment by law enforcement, and the differentiated exercise of discretion by officials across the spectrum of the juvenile justice system.  

Accession number
25415
Authors
Epstein, R., Blake, J.J., Gonzalez, T.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, Washington, DC

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality at http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-ineq….

Beyond ACE: Summary Findings from the Crittenton Family of Agencies 2014-2015 Administration of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Survey

Beyond ACE: Summary Findings from the Crittenton Family of Agencies 2014-2015 Administration of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Survey
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This policy brief from The National Crittenton Foundation (TNCF) summarizes findings from an Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) survey of 1,015 individuals, including 745 females and 270 males. TNCF conducted the survey across 18 agencies in 16 states. The study found that girls and young women who receive support from TNCF agencies have significantly higher ACE scores than respondents from other ACE studies indicating a higher prevalence of adverse childhood experiences. This brief suggests future research on ACEs and well-being for girls in TNCF programs and their families to break the cycle of exposure to childhood adversity and the resulting trauma.

Accession number
25679
Type new
Brief
Organization

The National Crittenton Foundation

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge on the TNCF website at: https://nationalcrittenton.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/ACE_REPORT_fi…

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Working with Girls

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Working with Girls
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief provides background information about how girls experiencing homelessness often become involved with the juvenile justice system. For instance, girls are arrested and charged more often for status offenses than boys. Furthermore, girls are more likely to be arrested and detained for charges of running away from home than their male counterparts. The brief also summarizes the prevalence and types of abuse and exploitation experienced by girls in the home and on the street. The Coalition for Juvenile Justice emphasizes the need for stakeholders to develop gender-responsive support and practices for girls and offers recommendations for juvenile justice and homeless youth-serving agencies. 

Accession number
25441
Authors
Coalition for Juvenile Justice
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/Girls%20Fi…

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the intersection between system-involved youth and runaway and homeless youth. It cites data from interviews with 656 runaway and homeless youth (ages 14 to 21) in 11 cities that show nearly 78 percent of the participants had at least one interaction with law enforcement. In addition, 7 percent of survey participants directly attributed their first homelessness experience with exiting jail or prison. In Part I of the report, the authors describe each of the 10 Principles of Change developed by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in collaboration with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The principles provide a roadmap for communities to help young people avoid experiencing juvenile justice system involvement or youth homelessness. In Part II, the report gives specific resources and examples related to each Principle of Change. Appendix I outlines a case study of Davidson County, Tennessee, as a juvenile court system working to decriminalize and address youth homelessness. Appendix II describes state-level efforts in Maryland, South Carolina, and Vermont that focus on homelessness among system-involved youth. 

Accession number
25457
Authors
Pilnik, L., Bardine, D., Furr, L., Maury, M., Sickmund, M., Smoot, N., Szanyi, J,
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/FINAL%20Pr…