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Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Familial Sex Trafficking of Minors: Trafficking Conditions, Clinical Presentations, and System Involvement

Familial Sex Trafficking of Minors: Trafficking Conditions, Clinical Presentations, and System Involvement
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a study that analyzed familial sex trafficking among a sample of 31 child welfare-involved children referred for behavioral health assessment and treatment. The mixed methods study looked at victim and trafficker characteristics, gender differences in clinical outcomes in sex-trafficked children, and geographical differences in severity of the victimization experience. The researchers found high rates of family members trafficking children for illicit drugs; high severity of abuse using the Sexual Abuse Severity Score, with higher severity of abuse for children living in rural communities; and clinical threshold level scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC-A). They found boys and girls had similar clinical profiles except boys had higher CBCL externalizing scores and females had higher TSCC depression scores. In addition, more than half of the children in the sample had attempted suicide in their lifetime. This study helps expose familial sex trafficking and creates a context for further investigations. The researchers discuss implications for identification and effective responses to familial sex trafficking with a focus on gender and geography.

Accession number
25645
Authors
Sprang, G., Cole, J.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Family Violence

Volume new
33
Year published new
2018
Availability

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change

Addressing the Intersections of Juvenile Justice Involvement and Youth Homelessness: Principles for Change
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the intersection between system-involved youth and runaway and homeless youth. It cites data from interviews with 656 runaway and homeless youth (ages 14 to 21) in 11 cities that show nearly 78 percent of the participants had at least one interaction with law enforcement. In addition, 7 percent of survey participants directly attributed their first homelessness experience with exiting jail or prison. In Part I of the report, the authors describe each of the 10 Principles of Change developed by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice in collaboration with the National Network for Youth and the National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families. The principles provide a roadmap for communities to help young people avoid experiencing juvenile justice system involvement or youth homelessness. In Part II, the report gives specific resources and examples related to each Principle of Change. Appendix I outlines a case study of Davidson County, Tennessee, as a juvenile court system working to decriminalize and address youth homelessness. Appendix II describes state-level efforts in Maryland, South Carolina, and Vermont that focus on homelessness among system-involved youth. 

Accession number
25457
Authors
Pilnik, L., Bardine, D., Furr, L., Maury, M., Sickmund, M., Smoot, N., Szanyi, J,
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full report available for free download on the Coalition for Juvenile Justice website at: http://www.juvjustice.org/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/FINAL%20Pr…