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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Evidence-Based Practices

Preventing Suicide: A Technical Package of Policy, Programs, and Practices

Preventing Suicide: A Technical Package of Policy, Programs, and Practices
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, developed this technical package to help communities and states prioritize prevention activities based on the best available evidence. The three components of this technical package are intended as a resource to guide and inform the prevention decision-making process. First, it provides strategies to strengthen economic supports, improve access and delivery of suicide care, create protective environments, promote connectedness, teach coping and problem-solving skills, identify and support people at risk, and lessen harms and future risk. Second, it provides approaches to advance the strategies through programs, policies, and practices. Third, it supports each approach with evidence about preventing suicide and the associated risk factors. An appendix presents a quick guide to the three components.

Accession number
25550
Authors
Stone, D., Holland, K., Bartholow, B., Crosby, A., Davis, S., Wilkins, N.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/suicideTechnicalPackage.pdf

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Urban Institute designed this toolkit for individuals, governments, and organizations currently working on a pay for success (PFS) project or considering initiating a PFS project. This assessment tool describes the core elements of PFS projects and explains the importance of each core element. It also provides stakeholders with a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project and generates recommendations for remedying any weaknesses. Stakeholders can use this tool at any stage of project development. Completing this assessment also helps build the business case for a proposed project that scores well in each area.

Accession number
25689
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M., Walsh, K., Roman, J.K.
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/library/pfs-guidance-briefs-and-reports/content/p…

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders

Pay for Success Feasibility Tool Kit: Considerations for State and Local Leaders
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This toolkit from the US Department of Education provides general information about Pay for Success (PFS) projects, which are projects that support evidence-based approaches by leveraging private investment to address societal problems and challenges while typically using government funds only when a project meets measurable, positive outcomes. This toolkit is an introductory guide for state and local governments and other stakeholders interested in exploring the possibility of a PFS project for education or related societal issues. It provides information to support stakeholders in determining if PFS is a viable financing strategy for them, lays out steps usually involved in conducting a feasibility study, and highlights critical questions and important safeguards to consider in using PFS. The Appendix includes tools that may be useful for PFS projects, including definitions of terms used throughout the document.

Accession number
25688
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development

Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the US Department of Education website at: https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/pay-for-success/pay-for-success-tool…

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness

Missed Opportunities: Evidence on Interventions for Addressing Youth Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the eighth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents the results of a literature review conducted to determine what evidence exists on the effectiveness of programs and practices to prevent youth homelessness and improve various outcomes. The researchers selected 62 studies involving youth homelessness, which evaluated 51 programs, to develop an initial evidence base. This brief outlines the six key findings from this systematic review and the researchers recommendations to expand the evidence base for youth homelessness interventions. These include: 1. A small evidence base shows that youth homeless is preventable; 2. Rental assistance and supportive housing programs show promising results; 3. Most evaluations focus on interventions that address well-being and risk behaviors and show positive results; 4. Family-based interventions show positive results for behavioral health, but more evidence is needed; 5. There is little evidence on interventions to help youth experiencing homelessness achieve better employment outcomes; and 6. There is an alarming mismatch between investments in interventions and their evaluation. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25821
Authors
Morton, M.H., Kugley, S., Epstein, R.A., Farrell, A.F.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/voices-evidence-review/

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department

Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a project to implement a screening system and treatment algorithm in an emergency department (ED) to improve the identification and rescue of human trafficking victims. After conducting a literature review on human trafficking, a multidisciplinary team completed a gap analysis between evidence-based best practices and current practices of a level 2 trauma center at a community hospital in southwestern Pennsylvania. The project ED had no standardized education or screening process for human trafficking. The project used a two-pronged identification approach that included embedding medical red flags from a risk-assessment tool into the electronic medical record and creating a silent notification process. Survey results from the ED participants indicated 75 percent reported that the education improved their competence level about human trafficking. The team assessed the success of implementation by the number of victims whom ED staff identified through either approach and how many accepted intervention.

Accession number
25585
Authors
Egyud, A., Stephens, K., Swanson-Bierman, B., DiCuccio, M., Whiteman, K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Emergency Nursing

Series
Practice Improvement
Volume new
43
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.jenonline.org/article/S0099-1767(17)30041-7/pdf

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design

From Evidence to Outcomes: Using Evidence to Inform Pay for Success Project Design
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Urban Institute describes the need for understanding and interpreting evidence for pay for success (PFS) projects and in broader public decision-making. The authors discuss the growing body of social science research showing the importance of strong evidence to determine which projects will work. This brief defines evidence, why it matters to PFS projects, how to assess the quality of existing evidence, and what to do when only limited evidence is available. The authors contend that using evidence to make public welfare decisions improves government effectiveness and drives better outcomes for society.

Accession number
25690
Authors
Milner, J., Eldridge, M.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Urban Institute

Series
Pay for Success Initiative
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the Urban Institute website at: https://pfs.urban.org/evaluation-toolkit/content/evidence-outcomes-usin…

Family Interventions for Youth Experiencing or at Risk of Homelessness

Family Interventions for Youth Experiencing or at Risk of Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The authors conducted a systematic literature review of research since 2000 that focuses on family intervention strategies for youth ages 12 to 24 within the runaway and homeless youth, child welfare, juvenile justice, and education sectors. They also conducted key informant interviews with advocates, technical assistance providers, and service providers. Each of the 49 identified interventions was rated based on the rigor of its design and classified as evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, emerging, or of interest. Interventions were also grouped into three categories--prevention, reunification, or reconnection--and assessed for positive effects and statistical significance. Six interventions were classified as evidence-based (Ecologically Based Family Therapy and Functional Family Therapy) or evidence-informed (Multidimensional Family Therapy, Multisystemic Therapy, Treatment Foster Care Oregon, and Support to Reunite, Involve, and Value Each Other). Results indicate that research has uncovered a few effective family intervention strategies that provide insight into what makes these strategies successful, but more research is needed to evaluate those targeted specifically to youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. More research is also needed on how to target family interventions to key subgroups such as youth who are racial and ethnic minorities and/or LGBTQ.   

Accession number
25404
Authors
Pergamit, M., Gelatt, J., Stratford, B., Beckwith, S., Martin, M.C.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute, Washington, DC

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge from HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/205401/FamilyInterventions.pdf.