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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Emergency Shelters

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) published this brief on the relationships between homelessness, enrollment in early care and education, and young children’s developmental outcomes after they leave emergency shelters. OPRE compared a sample of 925 children, ages 18 months to 59 months, 20 months after staying in emergency shelters with their same-age peers from all socioeconomic levels. The authors used nationally normative childhood developmental measures on developmental delays, school readiness, and behavioral challenges. In addition, the brief uses survey responses by parents to measure continued housing instability following a stay in emergency shelter and child care arrangements used by families during the 20-month period following the shelter stay.

Accession number
25682
Authors
Brown, S.R., Shinn, M., Khadduri, J.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the ACF OPRE website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/well-being-of-young-children-afte…

Housing Not Handcuffs: Ending the Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities

Housing Not Handcuffs: Ending the Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty (the Law Center) provides an overview of criminalization measures in effect across the country and looks at trends in the criminalization of homelessness, based on an analysis of the laws in 187 cities that the Law Center has tracked since 2006. This report analyzes local trends related to the enforcement of these laws and describes the growing federal trend to oppose and discourage local criminalization policies and practices. Next, the report discusses the ineffectiveness of laws criminally or civilly punishing life-sustaining activities among those experiencing homelessness, the cost of these laws to taxpayers, and how they often violate homeless persons’ constitutional and human rights. Finally, the Law Center recommends alternative practices for federal, state, and local governments to address the problem of visible homelessness in a sensible, humane, and legal way. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25720
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Law Centers website at: https://nlchp.org//wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Housing-Not-Handcuffs.pdf

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families

Family Options Study: 3-Year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) looks at the long-term effectiveness of various programs to address homelessness for families with children. The Family Options Study randomly assigned 2,282 families to four housing or services interventions between September 2010 and January 2012 across 12 sites nationwide. The interventions were 1) permanent housing subsidies, 2) community-based rapid rehousing, 3) project-based transitional housing, and 4) usual care (emergency shelter and housing or services that families can access without immediate referral to a program that would provide them with a place to live). Each family participating in the study had spent at least seven days in emergency shelter and had at least one child age 15 or younger at the point of enrollment. The study found that families offered a subsidy experienced less than half as many episodes of subsequent homelessness as well as improvements in measures related to residential stability, food security, and other non-housing domains compared with families offered the other three interventions. 

Accession number
25683
Authors
Gubits, D., Shinn, M., Wood, M., Bell, S., Dastrup, S., Solari, C.D., Brown, S.R., McInnis, D., McCall, T., Kattel, U.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on HUD User website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/sites/default/files/pdf/Family-Options-S…

Child Separation Among Families Experiencing Homelessness

Child Separation Among Families Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the ACF Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) uses data from the Family Options Study to explore how often children in homeless families were separated from their parents before, during, and after staying in emergency shelters. This analysis includes both voluntary and involuntary child separations among the 5,397 children in 2,282 families who either stayed with their families in emergency shelter or were separated from their families upon entry. The brief also describes the subsequent separation and reunification experiences of children in the 1,857 families who responded to the 20-month survey and the 1,784 families who responded to the 37-month survey. The findings show children separated from their families were older on average and most stayed with the other parent or relatives during separation.

Accession number
25718
Authors
Walton, D., Wood, M., Dunton, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge on the OPRE website at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/opre_child_separation_…

Child and Partner Transitions Among Families Experiencing Homelessness

Child and Partner Transitions Among Families Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief draws on the Family Options Study--a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-sponsored study conducted to determine whether the offer of a particular type of housing program helps a homeless family achieve housing stability and other positive outcomes for family well-being--to inform the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and HHS grantees in their efforts to prevent and end homelessness of families, children, and youth. It describes the experiences of the studys 1,857 adult heads of households, 677 other adults identified as spouses or partners, and the 4,341 children who were part of the families at shelter entry. Results suggest that housing and family instability are related, and families who stay in emergency shelters have dynamic family structures. About 30 percent of sheltered homeless families reported separation from at least one family member. Family transitions continued in the 20 months after being in an emergency shelter. For example, 10 percent of families experienced new child separations, while 8 percent reported reunification with children who had not been with the family in the shelter. Placements involving the child welfare system were rare at the time homeless families were staying in emergency shelters, but the incidence of such out-of-family placements grew over time. Separation from children while in emergency shelter was associated with additional housing instability in the 20 months following a shelter stay. Finally, additional housing instability following the families initial stay in shelter was associated with child separations as of 20 months later. Policy makers and practitioners should seek to understand parent-child and parent-partner separations and reunifications within families experiencing homelessness. (Author Abstract Modified) 

Accession number
25398
Authors
Walton, D., Dunton, L., Groves, L.
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief, OPRE Report No. 2017-26
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge from the HHS Administration for Children & Families, Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation website: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/resource/child-partner-transitions-among-f….

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report

Central Florida Tri-County Youth Count: Final Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall describes a study to provide an estimate of the size of the homeless youth population and its characteristics in three central Florida counties (Orange, Osceola, and Seminole). Information was also gathered about the types of services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Over three days, the project surveyed youth on the street and in services, which include shelters, transitional living programs, and drop-in centers. In addition, researchers examined data from the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and school systems. Findings include: 1) On a single night in October 2017, there was a total of 268 homeless and unstably housed youth ages 13 to 24 in the three counties. 2) Twelve percent of the surveyed homeless and unstably housed youth were 13 to 17 years old. 3) Youth in the foster care and justice systems were overrepresented in the three counties. 4) Providers in the three counties have 104 shelter, transitional living, rapid rehousing, and subsidized affordable housing slots available for youth, only 10 of which serve youth under age 18. 

Accession number
25739
Authors
Chrisler, A., Horwitz, B., Morton, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/central-florida-count-identifies-se…

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report reviews the status of current law in all 50 states and 6 territories related to 13 key issues that affect the lives of unaccompanied youth who experience homelessness. It offers an overview of the range of approaches taken by states since the last update in 2012, and the relative prevalence of these approaches. Key findings include: 1) Many jurisdictions lag behind in implementing changes to federal law that strengthen access to education for youth experiencing homelessness; 2) Punitive approaches to unaccompanied youth are prevalent in many jurisdictions; 3) Definitions of unaccompanied youth often fail to be inclusive, developmentally appropriate, and nonjudgmental; 4) Many jurisdictions authorize or require provision of health care, education, and other services to unaccompanied youth even in the absence of parental consent; and 5) Most jurisdictions provide youth with some ability to act on their own behalf. This collaborative publication from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and the National Network for Youth recommends policy changes to help protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness, and thus increase their prospects for positive future outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25715
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and National Network for Youth

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Network for Youth website at: https://www.nn4youth.org/wp-content/uploads/Alone-Without-A-Home-2019.p…

Adolescent Well-Being after Experiencing Family Homelessness

Adolescent Well-Being after Experiencing Family Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Accession number
25684
Type new
Brief
Organization

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation

Series
Homeless Families Research Brief
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for free download on the OPRE website at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/205256/adolescents.pdf

A Youth Homelessness System Assessment for New York City

A Youth Homelessness System Assessment for New York City
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a rapid, mixed-methods assessment of the system of services and supports available to youth experiencing homelessness in New York City. The assessment team found that significant gaps remain in prevention, affordable housing options, and coordination of youth services despite the city’s efforts to expand some services and prioritize youth homelessness. Based on these findings, Chapin Hall has recommended that the city establish a single office for an interagency response to youth homelessness with shared processes and tools for coordinated entry and support for youth, including affordable housing and career development opportunities. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25737
Authors
Morton, M.H., Kull, M.A., Chávez, R., Chrisler, A.J., Carreon, E., Bishop, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/research/assessment-of-new-york-citys-homele…