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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Emancipation

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Understanding Youth Rights: Helping Providers Navigate the Laws and Policies Affecting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This guide provides information about key applicable Texas and federal laws on emergency shelter/housing, emancipation, public education, medical treatment, and eligibility for state and federal benefits and how they apply to runaway, homeless, and unaccompanied youth. It also identifies how providers can empower youth voices and help youth understand their rights and responsibilities, as well as appreciate and uinderstand the cultural diversity among homeless youth. The last chapter identifies the benefits of collaborative relationships between youth service agencies and law enforcement and juvenile justice systems. Each section contains answers to freqently asked questions related to each subject and offers general guidelines for most situations. Also included are definitions of common terms and phrases used in the law and by government organizations. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25422
Authors
Texas Network of Youth Services
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Year published new
2016
Availability

Available for download free of charge on the Texas Network of Youth Services website at http://tnoys.org/wp-content/uploads/Youth-Rights-Guide_New-Version-2.pdf.

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth

Alone Without a Home: A National Review of State Laws Affecting Unaccompanied Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report reviews the status of current law in all 50 states and 6 territories related to 13 key issues that affect the lives of unaccompanied youth who experience homelessness. It offers an overview of the range of approaches taken by states since the last update in 2012, and the relative prevalence of these approaches. Key findings include: 1) Many jurisdictions lag behind in implementing changes to federal law that strengthen access to education for youth experiencing homelessness; 2) Punitive approaches to unaccompanied youth are prevalent in many jurisdictions; 3) Definitions of unaccompanied youth often fail to be inclusive, developmentally appropriate, and nonjudgmental; 4) Many jurisdictions authorize or require provision of health care, education, and other services to unaccompanied youth even in the absence of parental consent; and 5) Most jurisdictions provide youth with some ability to act on their own behalf. This collaborative publication from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and the National Network for Youth recommends policy changes to help protect the safety, development, health, and dignity of youth experiencing homelessness, and thus increase their prospects for positive future outcomes. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25715
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty and National Network for Youth

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Network for Youth website at: https://www.nn4youth.org/wp-content/uploads/Alone-Without-A-Home-2019.p…

A Growth Curve Analysis of Housing Quality among Transition-Aged Foster Youth

A Growth Curve Analysis of Housing Quality among Transition-Aged Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study designed to document changes in foster youth’s housing quality during the first 24 months following their emancipation. In addition, the authors evaluated associations between changes in housing quality and youth’s sociodemographic characteristics, childhood maltreatment experiences, and out-of-home placement history. The study used data collected from 172 emancipated foster youth who were also participating in a longitudinal study and by monthly summaries of their housing since emancipation. At six months post-emancipation, parenting youth and youth with a high school degree had higher housing quality. Females and youth who emancipated at older ages had a linear increase in housing quality at the six-month point. Those participants with declining housing quality were in three categories: 1) had childhood exposure to domestic violence, 2) were older when they entered foster care, and 3) were placed with a relative just prior to emancipation. The authors discuss how these findings can inform policy and practice to support housing quality for vulnerable youth in transition. (Author Abstract Modified) 

Accession number
25471
Authors
Tyrell, F.A., Yates, T.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child Youth Care Forum

Volume new
46
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for download: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-016-9370-1