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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Educational Attainment

Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Students Experiencing Homelessness

Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Students Experiencing Homelessness
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education describes the educational challenges faced by unaccompanied youth who are experiencing homelessness and outlines the key provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act related to this student population. The brief presents strategies school districts can use to support the educational success of unaccompanied youth. Additional resources are provided. 

Accession number
25660
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
McKinney-Vento Law Into Practice Brief Series
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the National Center for Homeless Education website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/youth.pdf

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care

Supporting Older Youth Beyond Age 18: Examining Data and Trends in Extended Foster Care
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report looks at the relationship between extended foster care and young adult outcomes. The researchers analyzed data from three national datasets on foster care history, independent living services, and extended foster care. They found that extended foster care is associated with better young adult outcomes and receipt of independent youth services. Despite the low rates of utilization in many states, extended foster care appears to benefit young people as they transition to adulthood. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25757
Authors
Rosenberg, R., Abbott, S.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Child Trends

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Trends website at: https://www.childtrends.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ExtendedFosterCa…

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors

Student Homelessness in New York City: School Instability Factors
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) is part of its Student Homelessness in New York City series. In this report, ICPH looks at disruptions that often coincide with the experience of housing stability, such as mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism, can threaten the educational stability. Consequently, these school instability factors may negatively affect academic performance and ruin a student’s ability to graduate. This report focuses on mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism and how to support students experiencing homelessness so they can fully experience the same educational opportunities as their housed peers. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25726
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SH_SchoolInstability…

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program

Solutions for Youth: An Evaluation of the Latin American Youth Centers Promotor Pathway Program
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report describes an evaluation of an intensive client management program, called Promotor Pathway, that aims to help high-risk and disconnected youth overcome significant life obstacles such as lack of education, homelessness, trauma, substance abuse, and court involvement. The Washington, DC-based Latin American Youth Center launched this program is 2008. At the core of the program is the premise that long-term, positive relationships with caring adults, or promotors, is the most important factor in helping youth reach their goals. The team of Urban Institute evaluators conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether the Promotor Pathway program improved the outcomes of youth in educational attainment, employment, reduced births, residential stability, and reduced risk-taking behaviors. They found that youth who had a promotor were more likely than the control group to use services by the end of the 18-month trial period. The youth with promotors were up to 30 percent more likely to receive services for mental health counseling, substance use, public assistance, and legal problems.

Accession number
25597
Authors
Theodos, B., Pergamit, M.R., Derian, A., Edelstein, S., Stolte, A.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Urban Institute

Year published new
2016
Availability

Available free of charge on the Urban Institutes website at: https://www.urban.org/research/publication/solutions-youth-evaluation-l…

Personal Perspectives on Providing Services to Foster Youth

Personal Perspectives on Providing Services to Foster Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

In this chapter, the author highlights common themes found in the extant literature that can inform ways to address the unique challenges of foster youth students in community college. These themes include educational attainment of foster youth as a social justice issue, effective practices that support student success, and recommendations for policy and practice. Coupled with recommendations from the literature, the author offers the perspectives of students about practices at community college campuses. The chapter highlights model programs that are uniquely positioned to serve this marginalized group of students on college campuses using an academic capital framework. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25554
Authors
Whitman, K.L.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

New Directions for Community Colleges

Series
Enrolling and Supporting Foster Youth
Volume new
2018
Year published new
2018
Availability

Full-text available free of charge at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/cc.20294

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Partnering to Support Educational Success for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) provides an overview of the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) and Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) programs and reviews the McKinney-Vento and Runway and Homeless Youth Act requirements related to cross-systems collaboration. NCHE suggests strategies to promote cross-system collaboration to support the education of runaway and homeless youth. The brief includes two partnership profiles and additional resources.

Accession number
25721
Type new
Brief
Organization

National Center for Homeless Education

Series
Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration Brief Series
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the NCHE website at: https://nche.ed.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/rhy-lea-collab.pdf

New Insights into the Back on Track Model’s Effects on Opportunity Youth Outcomes: Opportunity Works Final Evaluation Report

New Insights into the Back on Track Model’s Effects on Opportunity Youth Outcomes: Opportunity Works Final Evaluation Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report presents the results from a quasi-experimental evaluation by the Urban Institute in multiple Opportunity Works sites across the country. Opportunity Works was a three-year effort in Opportunity Youth Forum communities led by Jobs for the Future to help opportunity youth—young people ages 16 to 24 who are not in school or meaningfully employed—access post-secondary and career pathways. The study found large, consistent, positive effects on participants’ post-secondary enrollment and increased connection with either education or employment about one year after program entry. Specifically, Opportunity Works participants were twice as likely to enroll in college and 25% more likely to be in either education or employment. Post-secondary results were even greater for young men of color, who were nearly six times as likely to enroll in college. This report includes insights and lessons from qualitative field research. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25868
Authors
Anderson, T., Peters, H.E., Braga, B., Derrick-Mills, T., Dodkowski, A., Runes, C., Winkler, M.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

The Aspen Insititute Forum for Community Solutions

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Aspen Institutes website at: https://aspencommunitysolutions.org/report/new-insights-into-the-back-o…

More Than a Place to Sleep: Understanding the Health and Well-Being of Homeless High School Students

More Than a Place to Sleep: Understanding the Health and Well-Being of Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness (ICPH) presents the findings from an analysis of the differences in risk behaviors and health outcomes between homeless high school students and their housed classmates in New York City public and charter schools. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided access to anonymous self-reported data for the sample of high school students who participated in the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in 2015. YRBS includes questions that distinguish between homeless and housed students. ICPH found that while only 12 percent of the YBRS sample was homeless, these students represent a third or more of all students facing a range of health risks. The report presents key findings of the disparity in physical, emotional, and mental health outcomes for homeless students compared with their housed peers and discusses policy considerations to ameliorate this disproportionate burden, such as leveraging existing programs, linking health records to school data, and keeping health outcomes part of the narrative. The report provides a glossary of terms and the YRBS survey questions.

Accession number
25557
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness

Year published new
2017
Availability

Report available for free download on the Institute for Children, Poverty & Homelessness website at: https://www.icphusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/ICPH-MTAPTS-Report-W…

More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today

More than a Million Reasons for Hope: Youth Disconnection in America Today
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is the fifth in the Disconnection Youth series from Measure of America, a nonpartisan project of the Social Science Research Council, which began calculating the youth disconnection rate and analyzing its causes and implications for human development in 2012. The project defines disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, as teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. The report includes youth disconnection data for the United States by state, metro area, county, and community type, as well as by gender, race, and ethnicity.  The report concludes with examples of effective approaches to reducing youth disconnection that account for the many challenges that at-risk youth face.

Accession number
25633
Authors
Burd-Sharps, S., Lewis, K.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Social Science Research Council

Series
Measure of Americas Youth Disconnection Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence

Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Impact of Extended Foster Care on Foster Youths Postsecondary Education Enrollment and Persistence
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from Chapin Hall presents a study using data from a large sample of youth from California child welfare records to estimate the impact of extended foster care on postsecondary education outcomes. The sample includes youth who were in the child welfare system before and after the state of California extended foster care to age 21. The study looks at three outcomes: enrollment by age 21, persistence by age 21, and the number of semesters completed by age 21. The researchers found that extended foster care increases the likelihood that youth under supervised care will enroll in postsecondary education before turning 21 but does not increase the rates of persistence or the number of semesters completed among this youth population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25736
Authors
Okpych, N.J., Park, S., Courtney, M.E.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/CalYouth-College-Enrollme…