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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Economic Characteristics

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive

The Economic Well-Being of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Opportunity Passport Participant Survey Results Show Employment Helps Many Thrive
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Jim Casey Initiative’s Opportunity Passport program is a matched-savings intervention to help improve the financial capabilities of young people as they transition from foster care to adulthood. This research brief presents key findings from the survey data of program participants since 2008. The employment data includes rates, full-time status, average hours worked per week, hourly wages, and training experiences. Results indicate that Opportunity Passport participants seem to be faring well in employment. A higher proportion of Opportunity Passport participants are employed compared with young people in the general population as well as 17- and 19-year old National Youth in Transition Database respondents. However, some participants lagged behind others in employment gains, including young parents and young people in group placements.The brief provides recommendations for how policymakers and service providers should use this information to more effectively support young people. 

Accession number
25653
Type new
Brief
Organization

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Series
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available free of charge on the Annie E. Casey website at: https://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-theeconomicwellbeingofyouth-201…

Global Homelessness in a Post-Recession World

Global Homelessness in a Post-Recession World
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study of the global impact of the Great Recession of the late 2000s and early 2010s on trends for unsheltered homelessness in twenty of the largest municipalities in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The authors hypothesized a direct relationship between the recession and the level of homelessness. The Great Recession resulted in changes in homeless populations throughout the world. This economic crisis impacted economies in ways that put severe pressures on housing, particularly at lower-income brackets. The recession was generated by a housing bubble, which then constricted capital markets for housing. After the immediate crisis, economic stabilization was followed by stagflation or deflation with flat or decreasing wages in middle- to low-income brackets and high unemployment. Many governments responded with austerity measures to decrease public spending. The researchers focused on the roofless population (i.e., those without shelter of any kind, sleeping rough). In addition to affecting adults and families, the recession also affected unaccompanied youth. One 2012 study found that 75 percent of high school principals in California reported that the number of houseless or living insecure had increased among their students, even in schools within affluent neighborhoods. Results indicate no clear correlation between levels of homelessness and the Great Recession in most cities. While some cities experienced large increases in their identified homeless populations (e.g., London, Vienna, Berlin, Stockholm, Auckland, and Madrid), homelessness declined in other locations following the recession (e.g., Sydney, Budapest, and Tokyo). The authors conclude that there is a relationship between housing crises/recessions and street homelessness that is, however, mediated by factors such as policies, culture, demographics, and migration.   

Accession number
25424
Authors
Bainbridge, J., Carrizales, T.J.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

Marist College, Poughkeepsie, NY

Journal Name

Journal of Public Management and Social Policy

Volume new
24
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for download through the journal website at https://digitalscholarship.tsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1074&con….