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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Ecological Approach

Understanding the Link Between Victimization and Alcohol Use Among Homeless Youth Using Ecological Momentary Assessment

Understanding the Link Between Victimization and Alcohol Use Among Homeless Youth Using Ecological Momentary Assessment
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used ecological momentary assessment to look at victimization and alcohol use among homeless youth. Prior research on this topic was retrospective and thus did not capture the sequencing of events. The researchers used short message service surveying with 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 over 30 days. The results reveal that experiencing physical or sexual victimization on a specific day was positively associated with youth’s drinking alcohol later that day. Because this study method allows for such specificity, the authors contend that they can link a specific victimization experience with a current drinking episode. Thus, the time ordering of daily events in the current study is a significant improvement over prior research. Understanding the timing between victimization and drinking alcohol is also important for intervention with this underserved population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25604
Authors
Tyler, K.A., Olson, K., Ray, C.M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World

Volume new
4
Year published new
2018
Availability

Transition From Foster Care to Independent Living: Ecological Predictors Associated with Outcomes

Transition From Foster Care to Independent Living: Ecological Predictors Associated with Outcomes
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

Given the poor outcomes for youth aging out of foster care, and the small body of literature on what works to improve outcomes, this study was conducted to examine the youth characteristics associated with better outcomes and to explore transitional service program characteristics correlated with outcomes. A causal comparative research design was used, employing preexisting data. The researchers collected records of 329 foster youth from an agency in a large Texas urban/suburban area from the Transition Resource Action Center (TRAC) and Children’s Protective Services databases. To determine outcomes, the researchers used both TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix and case records. TRAC’s Self-Sufficiency Matrix has five domains: Education, Employment, Employability, Financial Literacy, and Shelter. The researchers examined differences in outcomes between youth who received TRAC services before and after leaving care as well as changes in overall Self-Sufficiency Matrix scores. They also analyzed which variables were predictive of scores on the Self-Sufficiency Matrix. The results of this study indicate that TRAC is having a positive influence on the youth receiving services. Youth showed significant improvement across four of the five identified domains and maintained on the fifth domain of employment. The researchers discuss the implications of these findings for future research, practice, and policy. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25544
Authors
Scannapieco, M., Smith, M., Blakeney-Strong, A.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

Volume new
33
Year published new
2016
Availability

Full-text article available for download at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10560-015-0426-0

Predicting Sexual Behaviors Among Homeless Young Adults: Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

Predicting Sexual Behaviors Among Homeless Young Adults: Ecological Momentary Assessment Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used ecological momentary assessments (EMAs) to examine real-time factors to determine the predictors of sexual activity among homeless youth given the disproportionately high prevalence of HIV infection among this population (homeless youth are six to 12 times more likely to become infected with HIV than housed youth). The researchers recruited 66 youth experiencing homelessness, ages 18 to 24, from a drop-in center in Houston, Texas. The participants were issued mobile phones that prompted brief EMAs five times a day for 21 days. The EMA items assessed near real-time sexual behaviors, thoughts, stress, emotions, and environmental factors. The findings showed that 70 percent of participants were sexually active during the reporting period and many engaged in high-risk behaviors such as having unprotected sex and sharing needles while injecting drugs. The researchers conclude that using real-time EMA data was successful in predicting sexual intercourse among the sample of predominately unsheltered homeless youth. They found that sexual urge and drug use accounts for increased odds of engaging in sexual activity on any given day; therefore, interventions targeting sexual urge and drug use may help predict sexual activity among a population at high risk for HIV.

Accession number
25571
Authors
Santa Maria, D., Padhye, N., Yang, Y., Gallardo, K., Businelle, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR Public Health and Surveillance

Volume new
4
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available free of charge online at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5915668/

Investigating Health Risk Environments in Housing Programs for Young Adults: Protocol for a Geographically Explicit Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

Investigating Health Risk Environments in Housing Programs for Young Adults: Protocol for a Geographically Explicit Ecological Momentary Assessment Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes the research protocol of the ongoing Log My Life study at the University of Southern California. This study uses a mixed-methods based on geographically explicit ecological momentary assessment (EMA) through cell phone technology to understand the risk environent of young adults who have either enrolled in housing programs or are currently homeless. The researchers collect data using web-based questionnaires and daily diaries through cell phones to understand the risk environments of young adults with regard to emotional affect, context, and health risk behavior, including infrequent risk behaviors such as sex in exchange for goods and services. They use EMA to look at how the study participants move around their environment throughout the day and whether these movements result in dangerous substance use and sexual activity. Mixing the quantitative and qualitative arms in this study will provide a more complete understanding of differences in risk environments between homeless and housed young adults. (author abstract modified) 

Accession number
25825
Authors
Henwood, B.F., Redline, B., Dzubur, E., Madden, D.R., Rhoades, H., Dunton, G.F., Rice, E., Semborski, S., Tang, Q., Intille, S.S.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR Research Protocols

Volume new
8
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the JMIR Publications website at: https://www.researchprotocols.org/2019/1

Drug Use Patterns and Predictors Among Homeless Youth: Results of an Ecological Momentary Assessment

Drug Use Patterns and Predictors Among Homeless Youth: Results of an Ecological Momentary Assessment
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that used Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) to examine the effect of urges on drug use among homeless youth. Using a sample of 66 homeless youth from a drop-in center in Houston, the researchers collected daily EMA to assess patterns of drug use and the correlation between real-time contextual factors and drug use. The study sample represents predominantly unsheltered and unstably housed homeless youth ages 18 to 25 with high incidences of drug use. Alcohol use was less prevalent in the study population. EMA data indicate that marijuana was the primary class of drug used. The researchers conclude that EMA can be used to predict drug use among homeless youth. Drug use treatment among homeless youth should address how experiencing discrimination, using pornography and alcohol, and using urge management strategies affect drug use. The authors recommend additional research to determine if EMA informed just-in-time interventions targeting these predictors can reduce use. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25500
Authors
Maria, D.S., Padhye, N., Yang, Y., Gallardo, K., Santos, G., Jung, J,, Businelle, M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Volume new
44
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00952990.2017.1407328