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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Depression

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Therapy: A Primer for Child Welfare Professionals

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Therapy: A Primer for Child Welfare Professionals
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This fact sheet from the Children’s Bureau defines trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) as a treatment that combines elements of cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, family therapy, attachment theory, and developmental neurobiology to help clients overcome trauma-related difficulties, including child maltreatment. TF-CBT may be an appropriate treatment for children and youth ages 3 to 18 who have experienced trauma or traumatic loss and present with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, behavioral problems, and other related symptoms.

Accession number
25753
Type new
Brief
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available on the Child Welfare Information Gateway website at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/trauma/

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report

Talking to Teens About Anxiety: A Supplement to the 2018 Childrens Mental Health Report
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This supplement to the 2018 Children’s Mental Health Report from the Child Mind Institute provides suggestions on how to talk about difficult subjects with teens. It discusses how to maintain ongoing conversations about normal fears, how persistent anxiety can develop into a disorder, and why early treatment is best. This guide describes how adults can build rapport with teens by being curious without being judgmental, showing trust, being collaborative, giving praise, and staying calm. It covers general anxiety; social anxiety; social media risks and rewards; anxiety and substance abuse; anxiety disorder, depression, and suicidality; and treatment.

Accession number
25778
Type new
Guide/Toolkit
Organization

Child Mind Institute

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Child Mind Institute website at: https://childmind.org/downloads/CMHR_2018_Supplement.pdf

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students

Suicide and Depression Among Homeless High School Students
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This brief from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents key findings from a study that shows homeless students are at significantly higher risk for suicide than the general high school student population. This study uses data from eight states and New York City, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collects through the self-reported Youth Risk Behavior Survey. ICPH recommends increasing the availability of mental health care services within schools, training teachers and school staff about trauma-informed care, and targeting services for homeless LGBTQ students.

Accession number
25731
Type new
Brief
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/suicide-and-depression-among-homeless-h…

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth

Role of Social Environmental Protective Factors on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Among Midwestern Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study conducted to examine how social environmental factors affect mental health outcomes of homeless youth. The study collected longitudinal data on 150 homeless youth ages 16 to 22 in two Midwestern cities in the United States. Using a social stress framework, the study examined gender, sexual orientation, and the number of times youth had run away, along with whether the youth had participated in foster care and whether the youth had been physically victimized while on the street. The framework also measured the degree to which the youth felt they had social support and positive role models in their lives. The researchers posited that runaway and homeless youth who fall into socially stigmatized categories based on their gender or sexual orientation would present with more depressive symptoms and higher levels of anxiety than their non-stigmatized counterparts in similar circumstances based on length of time on the street. They also questioned whether protective factors helped reduce poor mental health outcomes for study participants, regardless of social stigmatization status. Results revealed that numerous stressors, such as physical abuse and running away from home more frequently, were associated with greater depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety. Having mentors and family and friends from home that youth can rely on resulted in more positive social support, which subsequently lowered risk for depressive symptoms and anxiety during the second interview.

Accession number
25447
Authors
Tyler, Kimberley A., Schmitz, Rachel M., Ray, Colleen M.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Research on Adolescence

Volume new
28
Year published new
2017
Availability

Full-text article available for free download at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jora.12326

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth

Psychological Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a literature review that evaluated the effectiveness of psychological interventions for runaway and homeless youth in terms of mental health outcomes. The author identified five types of psychological interventions in 11 studies: art therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based interventions, family therapy, motivational interviewing, and strengths-based interventions. The findings show that family therapies are likely helpful for cases involving substance abuse and CBT-based interventions may work best for youth suffering from depression. However, the review did not find support for the effectiveness of any of the psychological interventions on mental health outcomes. In addition to recommending further research, the author encourages mental health nurses to assess the mental health status of runaway and homeless youth and provide timely and effective interventions. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25740
Authors
Noh, D.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Series
Clinical Scholarship
Volume new
50
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available with a subscription or article purchase at: https://sigmapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jnu.12402

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth

Predictors of Outreach Meetings Among Substance Using Homeless Youth
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that examined predictors of meetings with outreach workers among 79 homeless youth, ages 14 to 24, who self-reported substance use and were not currently connected to any supportive services. The study found the following factors predicted higher meeting frequency with an outreach worker: 1) being an older homeless youth, 2) not using hard drugs within the past 30 days, 3) experiencing higher levels of depressive symptoms, and 4) reporting fewer drug-related problems. The authors discuss how understanding what predicts outreach engagement can improve service providers ability to connect marginalized youth to resources to reduce unhealthy and dangerous risk behaviors. (Author Abstract Modified)

Accession number
25469
Authors
Carmona, J., Slesnick, N., Guo, X., Murnan, A., Brakenhoff, B.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

Community Mental Health Journal

Volume new
53
Year published new
2017
Availability

The full-text article is available for download via purchase or subscription: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10597-015-9919-8

A Mobile Phone-Based Intervention to Improve Mental Health Among Homeless Young Adults: Pilot Feasibility Trial

A Mobile Phone-Based Intervention to Improve Mental Health Among Homeless Young Adults: Pilot Feasibility Trial
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article describes a study that aimed to develop and test the feasibility of engaging youth (ages 18 to 24) who are experiencing homelessness in a remotely delivered mental health intervention. The researchers piloted the intervention in a homeless shelter with 35 study participants who received a mobile phone, service and data plans, and one month of support from a coach with up to three phone sessions. The intervention provided brief emotional support and coping skills using cognitive behavioral therapy principles. Most participants completed all of their phone sessions. Participants sent an average of 15.06 text messages and received an average of 19.34 messages. The study demonstrated the feasibility of engaging young adults in mental health services in a technology-based intervention with high rates of satisfaction. Technology may be an important avenue to reach young adults experiencing homelessness. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25824
Authors
Schueller, S.M. , Glover, A.C., Rufa, A.K., Dowdle, C.L., Gross, G.D., Karnik, N.S., Zalta, A.K.
Type new
Journal Article
Journal Name

JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Volume new
7
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the JMIR Publications website at: https://mhealth.jmir.org/2019/7/e12347/