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National Clearinghouse on Homeless Youth and Families

Demographics

Youth Involvement in the Sex Trade: A National Study

Youth Involvement in the Sex Trade: A National Study
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

The Center for Court Innovation produced this report in collaboration with the John Jay College of Criminal Justice about a study conducted to gain a representative portrait of the lives and needs of youth who are involved in exchanging sex for money, food, housing, drugs, or other goods. Funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention within the U.S. Department of Justice, the study provides a quantitative, multi-site analysis of findings from nearly 1,000 youth interviews across six sites, official criminal justice data sources, and interviews with service providers. The researchers used state and federal data sources to develop a national population estimate range of youth under 18 years of age who are engaged in the sex trade from a low of 4,457 to a high of 20,994. To date, the study has produced six reports providing comprehensive ethnographic findings concerning the lives of youth in the sex trade in each of the research sites: Atlantic City, NJ; the Bay Area, CA; Chicago, IL; Dallas, TX; Miami, FL; and Las Vegas, NV. The researchers selected geographically diverse sites that were deemed likely to possess a relatively sizable population of youth in the sex trade. The report summarizes the four principle study methodologies and presents findings from each methodology.

Accession number
25573
Authors
Swaner, R., Labriola, M., Rempel, M., Walker, A., Spadafore, J.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Center for Court Innovation

Year published new
2016
Availability

Full report available on the Center for Court Innovation website at: https://www.courtinnovation.org/sites/default/files/documents/Youth%20I…

Two Futures: The Economic Case for Keeping Youth on Track

Two Futures: The Economic Case for Keeping Youth on Track
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is the sixth in the Disconnection Youth series from Measure of America (MOA), a nonpartisan project of the Social Science Research Council, which began calculating the youth disconnection rate and analyzing its causes and implications for human development in 2012. The project defines disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, as teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. This report presents key findings from a study of the life trajectories of individuals at approximately 5, 10, and 15 years after their period of youth disconnection. The researchers looked at the effects of the duration of disconnection by assessing the differences among individuals who were disconnected for one, two, or three or more years. They also estimate the future costs of disconnection, both for the young people who experience it and for the communities in which they live.

Accession number
25638
Authors
Lewis, K., Gluskin, R.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Social Science Research Council

Series
Measure of Americas Disconnected Youth Series
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Measure of America website at: https://ssrc-static.s3.amazonaws.com/moa/PSID2018_FINAL.pdf

Student Homelessness in Rural America

Student Homelessness in Rural America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) presents national and state-level trends showing the highest rate of growth for student homelessness is occurring in rural communities. The U.S. Census Bureau defines rural communities as those located geographically outside of urbanized areas with fewer than 2,500 residents. ICPH found that over four school years from 2013 to 2017, the number of homeless students in rural areas increased by 11% compared with 3% nationwide. This report discusses the challenges of identifying and supporting these students and their families, federal funding levels to rural school districts, and the obstacles these students face specific to their rural environment. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25716
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness

Series
Community
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available free of charge on the ICPH website at: https://www.icphusa.org/reports/ruralreport/#thirty-eight-states-experi…

Runaway and Homeless Youth: Demographics and Programs

Runaway and Homeless Youth: Demographics and Programs
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report discusses the federal response to support the runaway and homeless youth population, specifically the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness; the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program, administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau; and other related programs. The report acknowledges that definitions of the terms “runaway” and “homeless youth” are not specified; however, both groups share the risk of having inadequate shelter and other provisions and may engage in harmful behaviors while away from a permanent home. These two groups also include “thrownaway” youth who are asked to leave their homes, as well as other vulnerable youth populations, such as current and former foster youth and youth with mental health issues. The term “unaccompanied youth” encompasses both runaways and homeless youth and is used in national data counts of the population. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25520
Authors
Fernandes-Alcantara, A.L.
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Congressional Research Service

Year published new
2018
Availability

This report is available online at: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL33785.pdf

Promising Gains, Persistent Gaps

Promising Gains, Persistent Gaps
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report is the fourth in the Disconnection Youth series from Measure of America (MOA), a nonpartisan project of the Social Science Research Council, which began calculating the youth disconnection rate and analyzing its causes and implications for human development in 2012. The project defines disconnected youth, also known as opportunity youth, as teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither in school nor working. The report includes youth disconnection data for the United States by state, metro area, county, as well as by gender, race, and ethnicity. In addition, this report explores how youth disconnection differs in rural, suburban, and urban communities. This research is intended for policymakers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to target and tailor their youth-focused interventions and to assess the effectiveness of their efforts.

Accession number
25637
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

Social Science Research Council

Series
Measure of Americas Disconnected Youth Series
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Measure of America website at: http://www.measureofamerica.org/youth-disconnection-2017/

Predictors of Running Away from Out-of-Home Care: Does County Context Matter?

Predictors of Running Away from Out-of-Home Care: Does County Context Matter?
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This journal article presents a study that used child-level placement data from the Multistate Foster Care Data Archive (n=53,610) to examine the incidence of running away during the first out-of-home care placement among adolescents. The authors found that 17 percent who entered out-of-home care for the first time ran away at least once during their first spell. Consistent with prior research, this study shows the rate at which youth run away once in foster care varies by gender, race/ethnicity, age, and placement type. The findings suggest that county context (i.e., population density and socioeconomic disadvantage) matters, although the authors recommend additional research to better understand these relationships. In addition, they found evidence that using a screening or risk assessment process for youth entering out-of-home care may reduce the incidence of running away.

Accession number
25672
Authors
Dworsky, A., Wulczyn, F., Huang, L.
Type new
Journal Article
Organization

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research

Journal Name

Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research

Volume new
20
Year published new
2018
Availability

Entire periodical available on the HUD Office of Policy Development and Research website at: https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/cityscpe/vol20num3/Cityscape…

Part I: Prevalence, Identification, and Action Steps for Schools

Part I: Prevalence, Identification, and Action Steps for Schools
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This research brief from SchoolHouse Connection looks at demographic and risk factor data of high school students experiencing homelessness compared with students not experiencing homelessness. It uses the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results from 17 states during the 2016-2017 school year. According to these results, 4.9% of high school students experienced homelessness at some point during the school year. However, public schools reported only 2.7% of high school students experienced homelessness. Based on these findings, SchoolHouse Connection contends that as many as one million students experiencing homelessness are not receiving needed services they are entitled to under the federal McKinney-Vento Act. This brief provides action steps and additional resources for schools. (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25798
Type new
Brief
Organization

Schoolhouse Connection

Series
Student Homelessness: Lessons Learned from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey
Year published new
2019
Availability

Available for free download on the SchoolHouse Connection website at: https://www.schoolhouseconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/YRBS-i…

National Trends on Youth in Crisis in the United States: An Analysis of Trends in Crisis Connections to the National Runaway Safeline over the Past Decade (2007-2017)

National Trends on Youth in Crisis in the United States: An Analysis of Trends in Crisis Connections to the National Runaway Safeline over the Past Decade (2007-2017)
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This report from the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) looks at the qualities and characteristics of youth in crisis over the ten-year period from 2007 to 2017. NRS presents information about the gender, age, and race and ethnicity of the young people who contact the safeline. The report also includes data in the following areas: current crisis situation of youth, length of time on the street, whereabouts when contacting NRS, means of survival, and issues raised when reaching out for help.

Accession number
25651
Type new
Paper/Research Report
Organization

National Runaway Safeline

Year published new
2018
Availability

Missed Opportunities: Youth Homelessness in Rural America

Missed Opportunities: Youth Homelessness in Rural America
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the fifth in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to understand and address youth homelessness. This brief presents new evidence on the distinctive issues of youth homelessness in rural communities nationwide. Limitations in the data about youth homelessness in rural America have kept this issue somewhat hidden compared with urban communities; however, research shows that youth homelessness is as common in rural counties as it is in nonrural counties. This brief outlines the key findings of what youth homelessness looks like in rural areas and offers recommendations for policymakers, local stakeholders, and practitioners to improve the services and supports for this often-underserved youth population.

Accession number
25624
Authors
Morton, M.H., Dworsky, A., Samuels, G.M., Patel, S.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2018
Availability

Available for free download on the Chapin Hall website at: https://www.chapinhall.org/wp-content/uploads/Youth-Homelessness-in-Rur…

Missed Opportunities: Youth Homelessness in America: National Estimates

Missed Opportunities: Youth Homelessness in America: National Estimates
Electronically published journal article, but not part of an issue

No

Abstract

This is the first in a series of Research-to-Impact briefs by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago on understanding and addressing youth homelessness. This brief provides information from the Voices of Youth Count national survey on unaccompanied youth homelessness in America. The study captures youth homelessness broadly, including sleeping on the streets, in shelters, running away, being kicked out, and couch surfing. Overall, findings show 1 in 10 young adults ages 18 to 25, and at least 1 in 30 adolescents ages 13 to 17, experience some form of homelessness unaccompanied by a parent or guardian over the course of a year. In this brief, the researchers outline key findings and recommendations on how all young people can reach their full potential and contribute to stronger communities and economies across the country.  (author abstract modified)

Accession number
25517
Authors
Morton, M.H., Samuels, G.M., Dworsky, A., Patel, S.
Type new
Brief
Organization

Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Series
Research-to-Impact Briefs
Year published new
2017
Availability

Available for free download on the Voices of Youth Count website at: http://voicesofyouthcount.org/brief/national-estimates-of-youth-homeles…